The inhibitory receptor CD300a is up-regulated by hypoxia and GM-CSF in human peripheral blood eosinophils

Authors


  • Edited by: Hans-Uwe Simon

Correspondence

Francesca Levi-Schaffer, Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, POB 12065, Jerusalem 91120, Israel.

Tel.: 972 2 6757512

Fax: 972 2 6758144

E-mail: francescal@ekmd.huji.ac.il

Abstract

Background

Eosinophils are involved in several inflammatory processes including allergic inflammation. It has been shown that eosinophil functions may be regulated by activating or inhibitory receptors. Hypoxia is a feature of inflamed tissues and has recently been shown to regulate eosinophil viability and pro-angiogenic potential. In this study, the effect of hypoxia and GM-CSF on the inhibitory receptor CD300a in human peripheral blood eosinophils was investigated.

Methods

CD300a expression on eosinophils was analyzed by flow cytometry and evaluated by immuno-fluorescence; mRNA levels were evaluated by RT-PCR.

Results

An increase in the expression of CD300a was observed in hypoxic eosinophils compared to the normoxic ones. GM-CSF strongly induced CD300a increase also after 3 h in culture. In addition, hypoxia augmented mRNA levels of CD300a. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 abolished the hypoxia-/GM-CSF-induced CD300a increase.

Conclusion

CD300a expression is up-regulated by hypoxia, and GM-CSF where HIF-1 might play an important role. These results are important for the understanding of eosinophils behavior in inflamed tissue and suggest a new effect on their function in allergic inflammation. Taken together our data point out CD300a as a novel target for the treatment of allergy.

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