Eosinophil-derived cytokines in health and disease: unraveling novel mechanisms of selective secretion

Authors

  • R. C. N. Melo,

    1. Laboratory of Cellular Biology, Department of Biology, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil
    2. Division of Allergy and Inflammation, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
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  • L. Liu,

    1. Division of Allergy and Inflammation, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
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  • J. J. Xenakis,

    1. Division of Allergy and Inflammation, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
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  • L. A. Spencer

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Allergy and Inflammation, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
    • Laboratory of Cellular Biology, Department of Biology, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil
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  • Edited by: Hans-Uwe Simon

Correspondence

Lisa A. Spencer, 330 Brookline Avenue, E/CLS Rm 935, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

Tel.: 617 735 4104

Fax: 617 735 4115

E-mail: lspencer@bidmc.harvard.edu

Abstract

Over the past two decades, our understanding of eosinophils has evolved from that of categorically destructive effector cells to include active participation in immune modulation, tissue repair processes, and normal organ development, in both health and disease. At the core of their newly appreciated functions is the capacity of eosinophils to synthesize, store within intracellular granules, and very rapidly secrete a highly diverse repertoire of cytokines. Mechanisms governing the selective secretion of preformed cytokines from eosinophils are attractive therapeutic targets and may well be more broadly applicable to other immune cells. Here, we discuss recent advances in deciphering pathways of cytokine secretion, both from intact eosinophils and from tissue-deposited cell-free eosinophil granules, extruded from eosinophils undergoing a lytic cell death.

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