Low vitamin D serum level is inversely associated with eczema in children and adolescents in Germany

Authors

  • I. Heimbeck,

    1. Medical Sociology, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany
    2. Institute of Lung Biology and Disease, CPC – Comprehensive Pneumology Center, Helmholtz Center Munich, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Munich, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • M. Wjst,

    1. Institute of Lung Biology and Disease, CPC – Comprehensive Pneumology Center, Helmholtz Center Munich, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Munich, Germany
    2. Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar der TU München, Munich, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • C. J. Apfelbacher

    Corresponding author
    • Medical Sociology, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Edited by: Hans-Uwe Simon

Correspondence

Dr. Christian Apfelbacher, Medical Sociology, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg, Germany.

Tel.: +4917622801993

Fax: +499419445202

E-mail: christian.apfelbacher@klinik.uni-regensburg.de

Abstract

Background

Recent studies have yielded heterogeneous results regarding the relationship between vitamin D and atopic conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between serum vitamin D level and the prevalence of eczema in German children and adolescents.

Methods

Data were drawn for children aged 1–17 from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS), a nationwide cross-sectional representative survey. 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) serum concentration was measured in 9838 individuals with eczema and categorized into quartiles. We investigated the association of vitamin D level and eczema by means of logistic regression models.

Results

Weighted prevalence of eczema was 13.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) 12.6–14.4%). Mean vitamin D level was significantly higher in those with eczema compared with those without (P < 0.0001). Logistic regression revealed an inverse association between low levels of vitamin D and eczema (multivariate OR for quartile 1 vs quartile 2: 0.76 (95% CI 0.61–0.94)).

Conclusions

This study suggests that low serum vitamin D level is inversely associated with eczema in German children and adolescents. Prospective studies are required to confirm this result, to discuss a potential opportunity for prevention of eczema.

Ancillary