American Ethnologist

Cover image for Vol. 40 Issue 1

February 2013

Volume 40, Issue 1

Pages 1–240

  1. Editor's foreword

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's foreword
    3. Commentary
    4. Science, Ethics, Humanitarianism
    5. Commentary
    6. Citizenship, Rights, Justice
    7. Cell Phones, Youth, and Intimate Economy in Mozambique
    8. Materiality, Design, Politics
    9. A Multispecies Approach to Biopower
    10. Religion, Rights, Morality
    11. Book Reviews
    1. Editor's foreword: AE's keywords by decade (pages 1–5)

      ANGELIQUE HAUGERUD

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12000

  2. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's foreword
    3. Commentary
    4. Science, Ethics, Humanitarianism
    5. Commentary
    6. Citizenship, Rights, Justice
    7. Cell Phones, Youth, and Intimate Economy in Mozambique
    8. Materiality, Design, Politics
    9. A Multispecies Approach to Biopower
    10. Religion, Rights, Morality
    11. Book Reviews
    1. Commentary: Keywords as a literacy practice in the history of anthropological theory (pages 6–12)

      LAURA M. AHEARN

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12001

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      Word clouds generated from the keywords and titles of articles published in American Ethnologist in the years 1982, 1992, 2002, and 2012 offer a fascinating, though partial, history of anthropological theory over the past several decades. Keyword selection also, I argue, constitutes a type of literacy practice that has been underanalyzed.

  3. Science, Ethics, Humanitarianism

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's foreword
    3. Commentary
    4. Science, Ethics, Humanitarianism
    5. Commentary
    6. Citizenship, Rights, Justice
    7. Cell Phones, Youth, and Intimate Economy in Mozambique
    8. Materiality, Design, Politics
    9. A Multispecies Approach to Biopower
    10. Religion, Rights, Morality
    11. Book Reviews
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Public secrets in public health: Knowing not to know while making scientific knowledge (pages 13–34)

      P. W. GEISSLER

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12002

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      Unknown knowns—or “public secrets”—may play an integral part in publicly funded medical science. In one large transnational field research site in Africa, such unknowing pertains to vital material inequalities across the relations of scientific production. These inequalities are open to experience but remain often unacknowledged in public speech and scientific texts.

  4. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's foreword
    3. Commentary
    4. Science, Ethics, Humanitarianism
    5. Commentary
    6. Citizenship, Rights, Justice
    7. Cell Phones, Youth, and Intimate Economy in Mozambique
    8. Materiality, Design, Politics
    9. A Multispecies Approach to Biopower
    10. Religion, Rights, Morality
    11. Book Reviews
  5. Citizenship, Rights, Justice

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's foreword
    3. Commentary
    4. Science, Ethics, Humanitarianism
    5. Commentary
    6. Citizenship, Rights, Justice
    7. Cell Phones, Youth, and Intimate Economy in Mozambique
    8. Materiality, Design, Politics
    9. A Multispecies Approach to Biopower
    10. Religion, Rights, Morality
    11. Book Reviews
    1. Exhuming the defeated: Civil War mass graves in 21st-century Spain (pages 38–54)

      FRANCISCO FERRÁNDIZ

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12004

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      The exhumations of two mass graves in a small Spanish village, conducted eight years apart, illustrate changing attitudes toward and procedures related to Civil War (1936–39) disinterments over the last decade. The sudden public visibility of skeletons of civilians executed by Francisco Franco's paramilitary has triggered heated debates both about how to handle these remains in a consolidated democratic state and what to make of related judicial and institutional initiatives.

  6. Cell Phones, Youth, and Intimate Economy in Mozambique

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's foreword
    3. Commentary
    4. Science, Ethics, Humanitarianism
    5. Commentary
    6. Citizenship, Rights, Justice
    7. Cell Phones, Youth, and Intimate Economy in Mozambique
    8. Materiality, Design, Politics
    9. A Multispecies Approach to Biopower
    10. Religion, Rights, Morality
    11. Book Reviews
  7. Materiality, Design, Politics

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's foreword
    3. Commentary
    4. Science, Ethics, Humanitarianism
    5. Commentary
    6. Citizenship, Rights, Justice
    7. Cell Phones, Youth, and Intimate Economy in Mozambique
    8. Materiality, Design, Politics
    9. A Multispecies Approach to Biopower
    10. Religion, Rights, Morality
    11. Book Reviews
    1. A cultural geometry: Designing political things in Sweden (pages 118–131)

      KEITH M. MURPHY

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12009

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      In Sweden, a long-standing and pervasive discourse delineates the significance of design—especially “Swedish design”—within a distinctly political framework. Just as the social democratic welfare state is in large part organized to “care” for its citizens, design in Sweden is supposed to “care” for the users of everyday goods.

  8. A Multispecies Approach to Biopower

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's foreword
    3. Commentary
    4. Science, Ethics, Humanitarianism
    5. Commentary
    6. Citizenship, Rights, Justice
    7. Cell Phones, Youth, and Intimate Economy in Mozambique
    8. Materiality, Design, Politics
    9. A Multispecies Approach to Biopower
    10. Religion, Rights, Morality
    11. Book Reviews
    1. Bird flu biopower: Strategies for multispecies coexistence in Việt Nam (pages 132–148)

      NATALIE PORTER

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12010

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      Outbreaks of SARS, swine flu, and avian influenza have prompted a “One Health” effort to control diseases transmitted between species. Using ethnographic observations from Việt Nam, I reveal how avian flu transforms strategies for living in light of human vulnerability to animals.

  9. Religion, Rights, Morality

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's foreword
    3. Commentary
    4. Science, Ethics, Humanitarianism
    5. Commentary
    6. Citizenship, Rights, Justice
    7. Cell Phones, Youth, and Intimate Economy in Mozambique
    8. Materiality, Design, Politics
    9. A Multispecies Approach to Biopower
    10. Religion, Rights, Morality
    11. Book Reviews
    1. The bodily threat of miracles: Security, sacramentality, and the Egyptian politics of public order (pages 149–164)

      ANGIE HEO

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12011

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      This article examines the political and public culture of Coptic Christian miracles through the circulation and reproduction of images and the mimetic entanglements of artifacts and objects. To understand the threat posed by one case of a woman's oil-exuding hand, this study points to how semiotic orders of security and sacramentality intersect in the regulation of bodily miracles.

    2. A pilgrimage to Arawān: Religious legitimacy, status, and ownership in Timbuktu (pages 165–181)

      JUDITH SCHEELE

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12012

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      Northern Mali has been shaken by drought and conflict since the 1960s, leading to gradual redefinitions of notions of status, social hierarchy, and rights in land and people. These changes indicate a fundamental shift from genealogical to territorial visions of the world: from notions of infinite encompassment and concomitant hierarchy to conceptions of rights as derived from “indigeneity” and exclusive categories of ownership and belonging.

    3. Confessional pluralism and the civil society effect: Liberal mediations of Islam and secularism in contemporary Turkey (pages 182–200)

      JEREMY F. WALTON

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12013

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      Practices and ideals of confessional pluralism and liberal interpretations of Islam have achieved new prominence in Turkish civil society in recent years. In this article, I marshal fieldwork conducted among a variety of Turkish Islamic civil society institutions to argue that confessional pluralism and liberal Islam have reoriented practices of politics and secularism in Turkey.

  10. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's foreword
    3. Commentary
    4. Science, Ethics, Humanitarianism
    5. Commentary
    6. Citizenship, Rights, Justice
    7. Cell Phones, Youth, and Intimate Economy in Mozambique
    8. Materiality, Design, Politics
    9. A Multispecies Approach to Biopower
    10. Religion, Rights, Morality
    11. Book Reviews

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