American Ethnologist

Cover image for Vol. 40 Issue 2

May 2013

Volume 40, Issue 2

Pages 241–418

  1. Editor's foreword

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's foreword
    3. Rethinking Global Systems
    4. Parody and Sincerity in Political Culture
    5. State, Youth, Gender, Play
    6. Book Reviews
    1. Editor's foreword (pages 241–243)

      ANGELIQUE HAUGERUD

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12016

  2. Rethinking Global Systems

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's foreword
    3. Rethinking Global Systems
    4. Parody and Sincerity in Political Culture
    5. State, Youth, Gender, Play
    6. Book Reviews
    1. Globalization as a discourse of hegemonic crisis: A global systemic analysis (pages 244–257)

      JONATHAN FRIEDMAN and KAJSA EKHOLM FRIEDMAN

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12017

  3. Parody and Sincerity in Political Culture

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's foreword
    3. Rethinking Global Systems
    4. Parody and Sincerity in Political Culture
    5. State, Youth, Gender, Play
    6. Book Reviews
    1. Simply the best: Parody and political sincerity in Iceland (pages 276–287)

      Dominic Boyer

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12020

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pursuing a self-described anarcho-surrealist politics in the aftermath of Iceland's banking crisis, Jón Gnarr shocked the country's political establishment by winning the mayoral election in Reykjavík in May 2010. In this article, I explore the rise of Gnarr's Best Party, especially its refusal to accept a distinction between parody and sincerity in its mode of political performance.

    2. Trusted puppets, tarnished politicians: Humor and cynicism in Berlusconi's Italy (pages 288–299)

      Noelle J. Molé

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12021

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      How does humor serve political leaders widely seen as inept? How does political satire shift when a country's own prime minister is both media mogul and object of ridicule? I examine humor of and about Italy's Silvio Berlusconi and look at the country's top news parody program, especially its mascot: a big, red puppet named Gabibbo, who is praised as a “civil defender.” I argue that Berlusconi's own humor forges ties to an Italian citizenry habituated in the 1980s to political spectacle—the carefully staged and sensational exhibitionism of national politics—and, subsequently, to the media saturation of late-liberal politics.

    3. The banana emperor: D. Pedro II in Brazilian caricatures, 1842–89 (pages 310–323)

      Lilia K. Moritz Schwarcz

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12023

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      Visual caricatures were important in the political, social, and cultural context of the Second Brazilian Reign (1842–89). With Pedro II as a central figure in the monarchy, most satirical artists concentrated on attacking his public image. Nevertheless, the results were always ambivalent. On the one hand, caricatures showed the monarchy becoming weaker and weaker throughout the period, and, in fact, it ended the year after the abolition of slavery in 1888.

  4. State, Youth, Gender, Play

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's foreword
    3. Rethinking Global Systems
    4. Parody and Sincerity in Political Culture
    5. State, Youth, Gender, Play
    6. Book Reviews
    1. Transnational circulation and digital fatigue in Ghana's Azonto dance craze (pages 362–381)

      Jesse Weaver Shipley

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12027

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      Azonto is a Ghanaian urban dance craze whose popularity is built through its global circulation. I trace its production and flow across studios, radio stations, dance floors, and digital platforms in Accra and among Ghanaians in London and New York. I argue that, as a technologically mediated style, Azonto is the embodiment of being Ghanaian in a mobile, digital world. This dance reveals both the potentials and the hazards of digital repetition and copying for self-recognition.

    2. State of play: The political ontology of sport in Amazonian Peru (pages 382–398)

      Harry Walker

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12028

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Building on the importance of “play” in traditional sociality, organized team sports such as soccer are instrumental in promoting a new moral and political order among Urarina people of Peruvian Amazonia, one grounded in notions of roles, rules, and the abstract individual. As a vehicle of nationalist sentiment, highly amenable to ritualization and bureaucratization, sport is central to the process by which the state expands its territory and influence.

  5. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's foreword
    3. Rethinking Global Systems
    4. Parody and Sincerity in Political Culture
    5. State, Youth, Gender, Play
    6. Book Reviews

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