American Ethnologist

Cover image for Vol. 40 Issue 4

November 2013

Volume 40, Issue 4

Pages 605–808

  1. Dialogue: Robots, Jazz, Creativity

    1. Top of page
    2. Dialogue: Robots, Jazz, Creativity
    3. Temporality, Ethics, Personhood
    4. Witchcraft, Gender, Kinship
    5. Money, Morality, Business
    6. Transnational Media Circuits
    7. Rethinking the State, Structural Violence, and Citizenship
    8. Book Reviews
    1. You have free access to this content
      Sociable robots, jazz music, and divination: Contingency as a cultural resource for negotiating problems of intentionality (pages 605–618)

      EITAN WILF

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12041

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In practices that range from mechanical divination in Central Africa to gamelike interactions among jazz students and the development of a jazz-improvising humanoid robot marimba player in the United States, contextually meaningful contingency is widely used as a cultural resource for negotiating problems of intentionality. Whereas anthropologists have been concerned with the use of contingency mostly as a cultural resource for increasing predictability of intentions in conflictual situations, I highlight contexts pervaded by modern normative ideals of creativity in which predictability of intentions constitutes a problem, for which contextually meaningful contingency is used as a solution.

    2. Commentary

      You have free access to this content
  2. Temporality, Ethics, Personhood

    1. Top of page
    2. Dialogue: Robots, Jazz, Creativity
    3. Temporality, Ethics, Personhood
    4. Witchcraft, Gender, Kinship
    5. Money, Morality, Business
    6. Transnational Media Circuits
    7. Rethinking the State, Structural Violence, and Citizenship
    8. Book Reviews
    1. Let us make God our banker: Ethics, temporality, and agency in a Ugandan charity home (pages 624–636)

      CHINA SCHERZ

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12043

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Faith in divine intervention affects the ethical and temporal orientations of a community of East African nuns managing a charity home in Central Uganda and leads them to make programmatic decisions that put them at odds with mainstream approaches in development and humanitarianism. By demonstrating that their resistance to long-term planning and audit practices is not the product of material privation or ignorance but, rather, a consciously developed orientation toward time and agency, I bring together concerns from the anthropology of religion and the anthropology of development. Further, by seeking to explain how the sisters come to hold their particular beliefs, I move beyond the elucidation of doctrine to show how mundane forms of practice are central to the formation of ethical subjectivity.

  3. Witchcraft, Gender, Kinship

    1. Top of page
    2. Dialogue: Robots, Jazz, Creativity
    3. Temporality, Ethics, Personhood
    4. Witchcraft, Gender, Kinship
    5. Money, Morality, Business
    6. Transnational Media Circuits
    7. Rethinking the State, Structural Violence, and Citizenship
    8. Book Reviews
  4. Money, Morality, Business

    1. Top of page
    2. Dialogue: Robots, Jazz, Creativity
    3. Temporality, Ethics, Personhood
    4. Witchcraft, Gender, Kinship
    5. Money, Morality, Business
    6. Transnational Media Circuits
    7. Rethinking the State, Structural Violence, and Citizenship
    8. Book Reviews
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. Transnational Media Circuits

    1. Top of page
    2. Dialogue: Robots, Jazz, Creativity
    3. Temporality, Ethics, Personhood
    4. Witchcraft, Gender, Kinship
    5. Money, Morality, Business
    6. Transnational Media Circuits
    7. Rethinking the State, Structural Violence, and Citizenship
    8. Book Reviews
    1. Making transnational publics: Circuits of censorship and technologies of publicity in Kurdish media circulation (pages 721–733)

      SUNCEM KOCER

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12050

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Kurdish media producers who interweave social and political agendas with their filmmaking are often marginalized within Turkish media worlds. Impeded by national censorship, these filmmakers move between national and transnational media worlds to advance their cinematic work. Such movement helps them create and maintain transnational publics that reinforce circulation of their media texts. Here I analyze how a documentary film about a seminomadic Kurdish community moves through international screening venues. As it journeys through film festivals in Europe, its director, Kazim Öz, accompanies it and, through deliberate discourse, attempts to increase and accelerate the film's transnational circulation.

  6. Rethinking the State, Structural Violence, and Citizenship

    1. Top of page
    2. Dialogue: Robots, Jazz, Creativity
    3. Temporality, Ethics, Personhood
    4. Witchcraft, Gender, Kinship
    5. Money, Morality, Business
    6. Transnational Media Circuits
    7. Rethinking the State, Structural Violence, and Citizenship
    8. Book Reviews
    1. Crossing Mexico: Structural violence and the commodification of undocumented Central American migrants (pages 764–780)

      WENDY A. VOGT

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12053

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The undocumented-migrant journey across Mexico has become a site of intense violence, exploitation, and profit making within the logics of capitalism. While transnational migration is often conceptualized from the perspective of sending and receiving communities and borderlands, I suggest the liminal spaces between these zones are crucial sites for understanding how structural forms of violence are reconfigured in local settings. Drawing on my ethnographic fieldwork in migrant shelters located along the journey, I trace how Central American migrants’ bodies, labor, and lives are transformed into commodities within economies of smuggling, extortion, and humanitarian aid.

  7. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Dialogue: Robots, Jazz, Creativity
    3. Temporality, Ethics, Personhood
    4. Witchcraft, Gender, Kinship
    5. Money, Morality, Business
    6. Transnational Media Circuits
    7. Rethinking the State, Structural Violence, and Citizenship
    8. Book Reviews

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION