American Ethnologist

Cover image for Vol. 41 Issue 2

May 2014

Volume 41, Issue 2

Pages 229–403

  1. Note from the editor

    1. Top of page
    2. Note from the editor
    3. Research Articles
    4. Book Reviews
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      Note from the editor (pages 229–231)

      ANGELIQUE HAUGERUD

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12071

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Note from the editor
    3. Research Articles
    4. Book Reviews
    1. You have free access to this content
    2. You have free access to this content
    3. Remitting wealth, reciprocating health? The “travel” of the land from Guinea-Bissau to Portugal (pages 261–275)

      MARIA ABRANCHES

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12074

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Homegrown food and other products of Guinea-Bissau's natural world offer protection and well-being to Guinean migrants in Portugal. In exploring this aspect of migration, I consider well-being in relation to both body and mind, in terms of health and illness and of solidarity and its withholding. Drawing on a multisited ethnography that looked equally at migrants and their nonmigrant kin, I link food, body, and mind to relationships of giving and reciprocating across borders in ways that challenge the classic assumption that the primary value of transnational migrant exchanges is economic. I argue that the active role of home-based kin in these exchanges and the travel of the materiality and symbology of the Guinean land that they facilitate are as central to migrants’ well-being as migrants’ financial and material remittances are to the well-being of those at home.

    4. When infrastructures attack: The workings of disrepair in China (pages 351–367)

      JULIE Y. CHU

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12080

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Residents fighting eviction in China often come into intimate knowledge of the insidious workings of infrastructure. This is especially true as redevelopment disputes are increasingly mediated through Chinese reforms emphasizing “rule by law.” Such reforms have worked to attune citizens, as well as city developers, to more distributed forms of agency in what could be termed the “infrastructuralization” of state power. I suggest that it is through the ambiguous signs of infrastructural disrepair that disputes over redevelopment increasingly play themselves out in contemporary China. By tracking the mundane and material effects of disrepair in citizen-state struggles, I ultimately show how infrastructures operate not only in support of state projects of legibility but also to condition some surprising political sensibilities. [infrastructure, urban development, China, law, sensibility, materiality, state violence]

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      Urban mosquitoes, situational publics, and the pursuit of interspecies separation in Dar es Salaam (pages 368–383)

      ANN H. KELLY and JAVIER LEZAUN

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/amet.12081

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent work in anthropology points to the recognition of multispecies entanglements as the grounds for a more ethical politics. In this article, we examine efforts to control mosquitoes in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, as an example of the laborious tasks of disentanglement that characterize public health interventions. The mosquito surveillance and larval elimination practices of an urban malaria control program offer an opportunity to observe how efforts to create distance between species relate to the physical and civic textures of the city. Seen in the particular context of the contemporary African metropolis, the work of public health appears less a matter of control than a commitment to constant urban maintenance and political mobilization. [multispecies ethnography, public health, malaria, Dar es Salaam, cities]

  3. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Note from the editor
    3. Research Articles
    4. Book Reviews

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