Association between neurological disorders, functioning, and mortality in the elderly

Authors

  • M. E. Czira,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany
    • M. E. Czira, Institute of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Muenster, Muenster D-48149, Germany

      Tel.: +49 251 83 58331

      Fax: +49 251 83 55300

      e-mail: czira@uni-muenster.de

    Search for more papers by this author
    • This is to indicate that both authors contributed equally to the present work and should therefore both be regarded as first authors.
  • B. T. Baune,

    1. Discipline of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
    • This is to indicate that both authors contributed equally to the present work and should therefore both be regarded as first authors.
  • A. Roesler,

    1. Department of Neuroradiology, Zentralklinikum Augsburg, Augsburg, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • K. Pfadenhauer,

    1. Department of Neurology, Zentralklinikum Augsburg, Augsburg, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • C. Trenkwalder,

    1. Paracelsus Elena-Klinik, Kassel, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • K. Berger

    1. Institute of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Objectives

In aging populations, the prevalence of neurological disorders increases, which imposes high population burden in terms of mortality, disability, and impaired quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of common neurological disorders and signs and their association with functioning and mortality in an elderly general population.

Materials and methods

We used data from the Memory and Morbidity in Augsburg Elderly (MEMO) project, a population-based study of 385 individuals aged ≥65. The prevalence of neurological disorders and signs was assessed by physical examination and medical interview. The basic and instrumental activities of daily living were assessed (ADL, IADL). We assessed the association of neurological disorders and signs with everyday functioning and prospectively analyzed their relationship with mortality.

Results

We observed considerably impaired functioning for cases with stroke, TIA, PD, and mild motor parkinsonian signs (MMPS). All-cause mortality was significantly increased in participants with stroke and MMPS, even after adjusting for co-variables (HR = 2.71 and 1.80, respectively).

Conclusions

We found that not only specific neurological disorders, but also earlier symptoms are related to impaired functioning and predict mortality in the elderly. These findings have potential clinical relevance for screening and early detection of individuals at risk.

Ancillary