Does lumbar puncture at night prevent post-dural puncture headache?

Authors


Abstract

Objectives

The aim of this study was to identify the patient-related risk factors for post-dural puncture headache with same standardized procedures.

Materials and methods

The inclusion criteria were patients (i) who underwent lumbar puncture for diagnostic purposes, (ii) with ≥10 years of age, and (iii) with no structural lesions that could cause headache from brain-computed tomography or magnetic resonance images. The primary endpoint for this study was post-dural-puncture headache as a dependent variable. The differences were analyzed with demographic and cerebrospinal fluid profiles as independent variables.

Results

Four hundred and thirteen patients met the inclusion criteria for this study, and 36 patients developed post-dural puncture headache. Patients with post-dural puncture headache were younger, had lower body mass index, and had less diabetes and hypertension. In cerebrospinal fluid profile, the counts of white blood cell and protein, and cerebrospinal fluid pressure were lower in patients with post-dural puncture headache than those without post-dural puncture headache, but glucose ratio was higher. Interestingly, patients who underwent puncture at daytime developed more post-dural puncture headache than those who were performed puncture at nighttime. After adjusting the clinical variables, multiple logistic regression analysis showed that younger age, lower cerebrospinal fluid pressure, and puncture at daytime were independently significant variables for predicting post-dural puncture headache.

Conclusions

We confirmed the risk factor for post-dural puncture headache such as young age, and newly found that patients who underwent puncture at daytime developed more post-dural puncture headache than those who were performed puncture at nighttime.

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