The impact of vitamin D on pregnancy: a systematic review

Authors

  • HENRIK T. CHRISTESEN,

    1. Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark
    2. Clinical Institute, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
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  • TINE FALKENBERG,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark
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  • RONALD F. LAMONT,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark
    2. Division of Surgery, University College, London, UK
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  • JAN S. JØRGENSEN

    1. Clinical Institute, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
    2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark
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  • Conflict of interest The authors have stated explicitly that there are no conflicts of interest in connection with this article.

  • Please cite this article as: Christesen HT, Falkenberg T, Lamont RF, Jørgensen JS. The impact of vitamin D on pregnancy: a systematic review. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012;91:DOI: 10.1111/aogs.12000.

Henrik Thybo Christesen, Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Sdr. Blvd. 29, 5000 Odense C, Denmark. E-mail: henrik.christesen@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk

Abstract

Hypovitaminosis D is common in pregnancy. To systematically review the evidence on vitamin D-dependent pregnancy outcomes, PubMed and Embase were searched for randomized control trials, cohort and case–control studies. In randomized control trials (n = 7), larger doses of vitamin D resulted in higher 25-hydroxylated vitamin D (25OHD) levels (n = 6), increased maternal weight gain (n = 1), and fewer classical vitamin D deficiency symptoms (n = 1). In observational studies (n = 32), lower vitamin D intake, or low 25OHD-levels, were associated with adverse fertility parameters (n = 2), preeclampsia (n = 5), gestational diabetes or higher blood glucose (n = 6), bacterial vaginosis (n = 4), primary cesarean section (n = 1), none (n = 3) or a few days’ (n = 2) shorter gestation, and postpartum depression (n = 1). Studies with few participants having low 25OHD did not identify an association to preeclampsia (n = 5) or gestational diabetes (n = 2). Increased odds of pregnancy-associated breast cancer with 25OHD >25.8 nmol/L were observed (n = 1). In conclusion, an effect of vitamin D on several pregnancy outcomes is suggested.

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