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Screen time and obesity

  1. Top of page
  2. Screen time and obesity
  3. Preterm gut microbiota changes – NEC and infection
  4. Kangaroo care
  5. IVF and cancer risk
  6. Bad breast milk

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Overweight and obesity amongst youth are more strongly associated with high screen time than with low physical activity, particularly in boys. This was revealed when 2200 randomly selected 9- to 16-year-old Australians provided 24-h use-of-time recalls. The authors conclude that screen time should be an important target behaviour for interventions aimed at reducing overweight and obesity amongst youth. Carol Maher et al (pp. 1170–1174).

Preterm gut microbiota changes – NEC and infection

  1. Top of page
  2. Screen time and obesity
  3. Preterm gut microbiota changes – NEC and infection
  4. Kangaroo care
  5. IVF and cancer risk
  6. Bad breast milk

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When stools from 38 preterm infants were analysed, important differences were found in the gut microbiota of infants who later developed necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and late onset sepsis (LOS). Presence of Enterobacter and Staphylococcus were associated with NEC and LOS respectively. The ability to define and replicate a ‘healthy’ preterm gut microbiota would be beneficial for the treatment of preterm infants, but whether changes in the gut microbiota observed are a consequence of changes that causes NEC and LOS or vice versa, remains unclear. CJ Stewart et al (pp. 1121–1127). See commentary by Viorica Braniste and Sven Pettersson (pp. 1112–1113).

Kangaroo care

  1. Top of page
  2. Screen time and obesity
  3. Preterm gut microbiota changes – NEC and infection
  4. Kangaroo care
  5. IVF and cancer risk
  6. Bad breast milk

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Skin-to-skin care is often used as comfort measures for infants undergoing painful procedures. In a Canadian pilot study, C Celeste et al found that the skin-to-skin care is slightly more effective in reducing pain scores if it is provided by the mother, compared to a nonrelated female (pp. 1147–1150).

Moreover, a survey evaluating attitudes and practices in neonatal intensive care units in the Nordic countries show that Danish, Norwegian and Swedish neonatal units are offering skin-to-skin care more extensively than units in Finland and Iceland. Emma Olsson et al (pp. 1140–1146).

IVF and cancer risk

  1. Top of page
  2. Screen time and obesity
  3. Preterm gut microbiota changes – NEC and infection
  4. Kangaroo care
  5. IVF and cancer risk
  6. Bad breast milk

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Children born after in vitro fertilization (IVF) have an increased risk to develop Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), a rare disease in which inflammatory cells accumulate in granulomatous lesions. In a study including Swedish children born 1982–2005, Selma O Åkefeldt et al. confirm the increased risk for LCH after IVF, and show that it is not due to overdiagnosis. A possible cause may be epigenetic factors triggered by the IVF. Interestingly, all children with LCH conceived by IVF were born before 2002, possibly reflecting changes in IVF methods over the years (pp. 1151–1155).

Bad breast milk

  1. Top of page
  2. Screen time and obesity
  3. Preterm gut microbiota changes – NEC and infection
  4. Kangaroo care
  5. IVF and cancer risk
  6. Bad breast milk

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On pp. 1102–1104, Michael Obladen analyses how antique medical doctrines impeded breastfeeding. In many societies, sexual intercourse was forbidden during lactation for fear that the mother’s milk would be spoiled. The doctrine originated from the antiques, but was adopted by many medical authors in the 15th to 18th century. This ban on intercourse provided an alibi for paternal infidelity and made the infant its own father’s rival. To comply with the doctrine the rich hired wet nurses and the poor relied on artificial feeding.