Clinical characteristics of eosinophilic and noneosinophilic asthma in children

Authors

  • Yong Ju Lee,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University, Seoul, Korea
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  • Kyung Won Kim,

    1. Department of Pediatrics and Institute of Allergy, Severance Medical Research Institute, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
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  • Bong Seok Choi,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Good Gangan Hospital, Busan, Korea
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  • Myung Hyun Sohn,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatrics and Institute of Allergy, Severance Medical Research Institute, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
    • Department of Pediatrics, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University, Seoul, Korea
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  • Kyu-Earn Kim

    1. Department of Pediatrics and Institute of Allergy, Severance Medical Research Institute, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
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  • The first two authors contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence

MH Sohn, Department of Pediatrics, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsan-no, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752, Korea.

Tel: +82-2-2228-2062 |

Fax: +82-2-393-9118 |

Email: mhsohn@yuhs.ac

Abstract

Aim

Asthma is a heterogeneous and complex chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. Asthma can be classified as eosinophilic asthma (EA) or noneosinophilic asthma (NEA). We investigated whether children with EA manifest different clinical characteristics than those with NEA.

Methods

We enrolled 288 steroid-naive asthmatic children and classified them, based on the cell counts in induced sputum, into EA (158 children) and NEA (89 children) groups.

Results

No significant differences were observed between the groups with regard to age, sex, family history of atopy, secondary smoking or asthma exacerbations. Moderate-to-severe asthma was more frequent in the EA group than in the NEA group. Blood eosinophil counts and serum eosinophil cationic protein were higher in EA patients than in NEA patients. The forced expiratory volume in 1 sec was lower in children with EA than in those with NEA (% of predicted value, 88.6 ± 18.5 vs. 93.6 ± 15.6, p < 0.05). The sputum eosinophil (in EA) and neutrophil (in NEA) counts increased with increasing asthma severity.

Conclusion

Airway inflammation, especially eosinophilic inflammation, was associated with asthma severity and reduced pulmonary function in children.

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