Incidental sonographic diagnosis of neonatal carotid occlusion

Authors

  • Marlou MA Raets,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neonatology, Sophia Children's Hospital Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    • Correspondence:

      Marlou MA Raets, M.D., Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Sophia Children's Hospital Erasmus Medical Center. Dr Molewaterplein 60, 3015 GJ Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

      Tel: +31-10-7036583 |

      Fax: +31-10-7036811 |

      Email: m.raets@erasmusmc.nl

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  • Maarten H Lequin,

    1. Department of Pediatric Radiology, Sophia Children's Hospital Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
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  • Annemarie Plaisier,

    1. Department of Neonatology, Sophia Children's Hospital Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Pediatric Radiology, Sophia Children's Hospital Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
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  • Jeroen Dudink,

    1. Department of Neonatology, Sophia Children's Hospital Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Pediatric Radiology, Sophia Children's Hospital Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
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  • Paul Govaert

    1. Department of Neonatology, Sophia Children's Hospital Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Pediatrics, Koningin Paola Children's Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium
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Abstract

Cranial ultrasonography including colour Doppler can detect neonatal carotid flow problems at an early stage, even before symptoms occur. Different pathogeneses can be identified. The condition is more frequent than previously reported. If the circle of Willis is fully developed, this can prevent brain injury even in case of total carotid flow obstruction

Conclusion

Screening of the carotid artery in critically ill neonates may detect complications of treatment at an early stage.

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