Delayed first otoacoustic emissions test decreases failure on neonatal hearing screening after caesarean delivery

Authors

  • Tatiana Smolkin,

    1. Department of Neonatology – Meyer Children's Hospital, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel
    2. Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
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  • Sharehan Awawdeh,

    1. Department of Neonatology – Meyer Children's Hospital, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel
    2. Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
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  • Shraga Blazer,

    1. Department of Neonatology – Meyer Children's Hospital, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel
    2. Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
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  • Orna Mick,

    1. Audiology Clinic, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel
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  • Imad R Makhoul

    Corresponding author
    1. Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel
    • Department of Neonatology – Meyer Children's Hospital, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel
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Correspondence

Imad R Makhoul, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Neonatology, Rambam Medical Center, Bat-Galim, Haifa 31096, Israel.

Tel: 972-4-8542219 |

Fax: 972-4-8543430 |

Email: makhoul@rambam.health.gov.il

Abstract

Aim

Caesarean delivery (CD) was associated with a 3.2-fold higher failure on 1st otoacoustic emissions (OAE) hearing test. We aimed to verify whether postponing 1st OAE beyond 48 h in CD infants decreases hearing screening failure.

Methods

We compared two groups of CD infants as to failure on 1st OAE test: early-1st OAE (n = 560): 1st OAE at 12- to 48-h-olds and late-1st OAE (n = 566): 1st OAE at 48- to 132-h-olds.

Results

Compared with early-1st OAE group, the failure rate among late-1st OAE infants was significantly sixfold lower (20.5% vs. 3.4%), with sixfold lower need for repeated tests: 205 vs. 34 tests/1000 CD neonates (p < 0.001). The failure rate decreased with increasing age in both groups (p < 0.001). Univariate analysis: timing of 1st OAE (late vs. early) was significantly associated with failure on 1st OAE. Multivariable analysis: late (48–132 h) 1st OAE test was associated with a 7.7-fold lower risk for failure of 1st OAE, OR (95% CI): 0.13 (0.08–0.21).

Conclusion

Among CD infants, the risk for failure in late-1st OAE group (>48 h) was 7.7-fold lower, with a sixfold lower need for repeated hearing tests. Delaying 1st OAE in CD infants beyond 48 h of age (preferably between 48 and 132 h) decreases neonatal OAE screening failure.

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