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Neuropaediatric and neuroarchaeology

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  2. Neuropaediatric and neuroarchaeology
  3. Lower O2 saturation in Jerusalem babies
  4. Antenatal steroid affects gene expression
  5. Risk factors for accidental out of hospital deliveries
  6. Boys and parents about circumcision
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In September 2012, Yehezkel Ben-Ari brought together some international experts to discuss brain development and how to correct neurological and psychiatric disorders. The concept of neuroarcheology refers to late manifestations of immature currents or misconnected neurons during early life. During the meeting there was a particular emphasis on the links between activity and genes in generating functional networks and how these can lead to neurological disorders when they do not operate correctly. It is now time to focus more on how neurons and networks are active during brain development, rather than chasing new mutations. See Acta Paediatrica Perspectives (pp. 331–334).

Lower O2 saturation in Jerusalem babies

  1. Top of page
  2. Neuropaediatric and neuroarchaeology
  3. Lower O2 saturation in Jerusalem babies
  4. Antenatal steroid affects gene expression
  5. Risk factors for accidental out of hospital deliveries
  6. Boys and parents about circumcision
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The American Academy of Pediatrics recommend screening newborns with pulse oximeter saturation (SpO2) <95% for critical congenital heart disease. It suggests that this cut-off may need modification at high altitude. A study by Tal Y Samuel et al., conducted in Israel, indicates that the cut-offs may need adjustment at mild altitude as well. Already at an elevation of 780 m above sea level in Jerusalem, SpO2 in healthy newborn infants was 0.4% lower compared with infants born at sea level in Tel Aviv. Such a reduction is expected to result in up to 3.5 times more false-positive results when using the proposed cut-offs. See article (pp. 379–384).

Antenatal steroid affects gene expression

  1. Top of page
  2. Neuropaediatric and neuroarchaeology
  3. Lower O2 saturation in Jerusalem babies
  4. Antenatal steroid affects gene expression
  5. Risk factors for accidental out of hospital deliveries
  6. Boys and parents about circumcision
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Antenatal steroid treatment is one of the most important contributions to decreased mortality and morbidity in premature infants during the last decades. But there are concerns about possible long-term adverse effects. For the first time, a whole-genome expression study has been performed comparing 50 preterm newborns who received antenatal steroids with a control group of 70 infants who did not. The result showed that antenatal steroids therapy affects some genes and gene pathways related to cancer, inflammation, oxidative stress and male infertility. Although the effect was short-lived, long-term changes cannot be ruled out. See article by Ola Didrik Saugstad et al. (pp. 349–355).

Risk factors for accidental out of hospital deliveries

  1. Top of page
  2. Neuropaediatric and neuroarchaeology
  3. Lower O2 saturation in Jerusalem babies
  4. Antenatal steroid affects gene expression
  5. Risk factors for accidental out of hospital deliveries
  6. Boys and parents about circumcision
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Accidental out-of-hospital deliveries represent 0.5% of life births in France and are associated with poor neonatal outcome. In a population based case-control study conducted in Brittany, four risk factors for accidental out of hospital deliveries were identified: multiparity, poor antenatal care, unemployment and long travel time to delivery unit. See article by Laurent Renesme et al. (pp. e174–e177).

Boys and parents about circumcision

  1. Top of page
  2. Neuropaediatric and neuroarchaeology
  3. Lower O2 saturation in Jerusalem babies
  4. Antenatal steroid affects gene expression
  5. Risk factors for accidental out of hospital deliveries
  6. Boys and parents about circumcision
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Approximately one-third of the global male population is circumcised. To determine the attitude and knowledge about circumcision of previously circumcised early adolescent boys and their parents, Nergul Corduk et al. performed a survey in Turkey, where almost all male children are circumcised. One of the findings from the study was that boys who had been younger than 7 years at circumcision reported that they would prefer to be circumcised at an older age, while boys circumcised at the age of 7 years or older were more content about their age of circumcision. See article (pp. e169–e173).