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Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder increased the risk of injury: a population-based follow-up study

Authors

  • Jiunn-Horng Kang,

    1. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
    2. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Herng-Ching Lin,

    1. School of Health Care Administration, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Shiu-Dong Chung

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Health Care Administration, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan
    2. Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
    • Correspondence

      Shiu-Dong Chung, Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, No.21, Sec. 2, Nanya S. Rd., Banciao Dist., New Taipei City 220, Taiwan. Tel: 8966-7000 | Fax: 8966-7000 | Email: chungshiudong@gmail.com

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Abstract

Aim

To explore the frequency and risk for injury among children with Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Taiwan through a population-based study.

Methods

A total of 3616 subjects aged between four and twelve years diagnosed with ADHD were selected along with a comparison cohort comprising 18 080 subjects. Each subject was individually traced for a three-year period from their index date to identify those subjects who subsequently received a diagnosis of injury. We used stratified Cox proportional hazards regressions to examine the three-year injury-free survival rates between the two cohorts.

Results

Of the subjects, the incidence rate of injury during the three-year follow-up period was 7.97 (95% CI = 7.45–8.51) and 5.36 (95% CI = 5.17–5.56) for the study and comparison cohort, respectively. After adjusting for geographic region, the hazard ratio (HR) of injury for subjects with ADHD was 1.64 (95% CI = 1.50–1.79) that of comparison subjects. In addition, we found children with ADHD aged between four and 6 years to demonstrate a greater HR (1.98, 95% CI = 1.72–2.28) than those aged between seven and twelve (HR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.31–1.63).

Conclusions

Children with ADHD appear to be at a higher risk for injury than children that are not diagnosed with ADHD.

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