Healthcare utilization and health-related quality of life of adult survivors of preterm birth complicated by bronchopulmonary dysplasia

Authors

  • Stéphane Beaudoin,

    1. Respiratory Division, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC, Canada
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  • Geneviève M Tremblay,

    1. Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
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  • Dan Croitoru,

    1. Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
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  • Andrea Benedetti,

    1. Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
    2. Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics & Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
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  • Jennifer S Landry

    Corresponding author
    1. Respiratory Division, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC, Canada
    2. Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
    • Correspondence

      Jennifer S Landry, M.D., M.Sc., F.R.C.P.(C), Respiratory and Clinical Epidemiology Research Unit, McGill University, 3650 rue Saint-Urbain, room K1.18, Montreal, QC H2X 2P4, Canada.

      Tel: +514-934-1934 ext. 32152 |

      Fax: +514-843-2083 |

      Email: jennifer.landry@mcgill.ca

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Abstract

Aim

This study aims to characterize the impact of preterm birth, respiratory distress syndrome and bronchopulmonary dysplasia on quality of life and healthcare utilization in adulthood.

Methods

A mail survey on quality of life and respiratory health was sent to a list of potential subjects identified using the databases of the Régie de l'asssurance maladie du Québec. Four groups of adults born between 1987 and 1993 were compared: (i) preterm with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, (ii) preterm with respiratory distress syndrome, (iii) preterm without respiratory complications and (iv) term controls. As a complement, data from the governmental healthcare administrative databases were extracted for responders.

Results

Although the groups differed in their use of healthcare services and prescription drugs, no clinically significant difference was observed for Saint George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), SF-36v2 and Medical Research Council (MRC) Dyspnea Scale scores. However, compared to term subjects, bronchopulmonary dysplasia subjects were less likely to access higher education and more likely to be either invalid or unemployed.

Conclusion

Compared to term subjects, subjects with a history of prematurity and respiratory distress syndrome or bronchopulmonary dysplasia had similar health-related quality of life and respiratory symptoms despite greater use of healthcare services and prescription drugs.

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