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Children with facial pain

  1. Top of page
  2. Children with facial pain
  3. To predict outcome of abusive head trauma
  4. Science of breastfeeding
  5. Neonatal steroid use and outcome
  6. Testicular torsion in Taiwan

Chronic orofacial pain associated with a disease (COFPAD) is an unrecognized syndrome and poorly managed, especially in children. In this review article, Violaine Smaïl-Faugeron et al. conclude that a combination of pharmacotherapy, psychology and physiotherapy is the key treatment for children with facial pain. Training of nursing staff to deal with pain in children and its specificities can improve the assessment. In addition, the children and their close relatives should be educated in nonpharmacological technique for pain managements (see pp. 778–786).

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To predict outcome of abusive head trauma

  1. Top of page
  2. Children with facial pain
  3. To predict outcome of abusive head trauma
  4. Science of breastfeeding
  5. Neonatal steroid use and outcome
  6. Testicular torsion in Taiwan

Child abuse is the most common cause of serious head injury in children of <1 year of age. Koji Tanoue et al. have found that apparent diffusion coefficient values can be used to predict long-term neurodevelopmental outcome in patients with abusive head trauma. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A high apparent diffusion coefficient indicates that the cortical white matter tracts are disorganized (see pp. 805–808).

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Science of breastfeeding

  1. Top of page
  2. Children with facial pain
  3. To predict outcome of abusive head trauma
  4. Science of breastfeeding
  5. Neonatal steroid use and outcome
  6. Testicular torsion in Taiwan

In a randomized study performed in Bangladesh, breastfeeding counselling was found to increase the duration of exclusive breastfeeding but did not change infant growth or body composition at 54 months of age. See article by Ashraful I Khan et al. (pp. 815–823).

Samuele Naviglio and Alessandro Ventura question why breastfeeding research today is focused on long-term effects. We already know that breastfeeding is good. The real problem is that it is often hindered by difficulties experienced by mothers and children soon after birth, and it is on this issue that efforts should be concentrated (see pp. 797–798).

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Neonatal steroid use and outcome

  1. Top of page
  2. Children with facial pain
  3. To predict outcome of abusive head trauma
  4. Science of breastfeeding
  5. Neonatal steroid use and outcome
  6. Testicular torsion in Taiwan

Étienne Fortin-Pellerin et al. have evaluated the local practices for prescription of neonatal steroids at the neonatal intensive care unit at Sainte-Justine Hospital in Montreal, Canada. Postnatal steroids, as they were used in the unit, were not associated with an increase in survival, but in an increase in time to death. Infants who received steroids for pulmonary indication had a more impaired neurological and cognitive outcome than infants treated for other reasons (see pp. 799–804).

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Testicular torsion in Taiwan

  1. Top of page
  2. Children with facial pain
  3. To predict outcome of abusive head trauma
  4. Science of breastfeeding
  5. Neonatal steroid use and outcome
  6. Testicular torsion in Taiwan

A nationwide study in Taiwan showed that the estimated incidence of testicular torsion was 3.5 cases per 1 000 000 per year in men younger than 25, which is similar to previous reports from the United States. If treated within 6 h, there is a 90% chance of preserving the testicle. Delayed treatment would result in orchiectomy and testicular loss. The Taiwanese study showed that the risk of testicular loss was significantly correlated with age, race and insurance status. See article by Wei-Yi Huang et al. (pp. e363–e367).

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