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Australian Journal of Public Administration

Cover image for Vol. 74 Issue 1

March 2015

Volume 74, Issue 1

Pages 1–99

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Research and Evaluation
    4. Controversies-Commentaries
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      Looking to the Past and the Future of the Australian Journal of Public Administration (pages 1–4)

      Helen Dickinson, Maria Katsonis, Adrian Kay, Janine O'Flynn and Anne Tiernan

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12136

  2. Research and Evaluation

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Research and Evaluation
    4. Controversies-Commentaries
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      Relationships between Policy Academics and Public Servants: Learning at a Distance? (pages 5–12)

      Brian W. Head

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12133

      Evidence-based policy is central to debates in policy and administration, but we don't yet understand in enough detail the relationships between policy academics and public servants. This article, which opens the first issue of the AJPA under its new editorial team, discusses the cultures and practices of these groups, pointing to common interests and the potential for building closer relationships.

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      Public Sector Reform (pages 13–22)

      Doug McTaggart and Janine O'Flynn

      Article first published online: 10 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12128

      Debate about public sector reform is at the heart of the field of public administration. In this article Doug McTaggart and Janine O'Flynn set out the challenges and opportunities for reform from the perspective of practitioner and scholar. Whilst they share some views, there is considerable debate about whether business as usual must end, or whether we are stuck in current modes of operating.

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      The Future of the Public Service Workforce: A Dialogue (pages 23–32)

      Helen Dickinson, Helen Sullivan and Graeme Head

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12143

      This paper is a dialogue between academics from the University and Melbourne and the New South Wales Public Service Commissioner about the future of the public service workforce.

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      Success and Failure in Public Policy: Twin Imposters or Avenues for Reform? Selected Evidence from 40 Years of Health-care Reform in Australia (pages 33–41)

      Adrian Kay and Anne-marie Boxall

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12135

      This research investigates why and how policy failures may be causally linked to future policy events in sequences over extended periods of time. In particular, the focus is on the different mechanisms that might connect assessments of policy failure and subsequent reform success. These mechanisms contain lessons for future reformers.

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      Digital Government: A Primer and Professional Perspectives (pages 42–52)

      Maria Katsonis and Andrew Botros

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12144

      Digital technology is a critical enabler of public administration reforms. It can improve the efficiency and productivity of government agencies and allow citizens to transact with government anytime, anywhere. It can also deepen the democratic process, empowering citizens to participate in policy formulation.

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      Craft and Capacity in the Public Service (pages 53–62)

      Anne Tiernan

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12134

      It's been a wild ride for public servants at all levels of Australian government over the past 8 years. This article examines how this volatile period has shaped debates about public service skills and capacities and prompted a greater focus on stewardship and the ‘craft’ of public administration.

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      Innovation in the Public Sector (pages 63–72)

      Martin Stewart-Weeks and Tim Kastelle

      Article first published online: 10 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12129

      We investigate these questions in public sector innovation: can the public sector innovate? If so, what is the best way to create a culture of innovation? What are the key obstacles and enablers of innovation in the public sector?

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      Performance Management in the Public Sector (pages 73–81)

      Damian West and Deborah Blackman

      Article first published online: 13 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12130

      Recent work undertaken on employee performance management with the Australia Public Service aims to develop high performance. Damian West outlines progress so far, stressing the importance of process implementation and system accountability. Deborah Blackman suggests that the role of performance as a strategic tool has been overshadowed by compliance, it needs reinstatement for there to be high performance.

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      The Federalism Debate (pages 82–92)

      John Brumby and Brian Galligan

      Article first published online: 10 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12132

      With a major review of the Australian federation under way, John Brumby and Brian Galligan call for both a renewed commitment to the federation, but also set out a series of weaknesses that need to be addressed.

  3. Controversies-Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Research and Evaluation
    4. Controversies-Commentaries
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      Federalism Dreaming? Re-imagining the Governance of Australian Landscapes (pages 93–99)

      Catherine Althaus and T.H. Morrison

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12127

      We propose a reimagining of Australian federalism that argues the value of listening to the history of the land in connection with its people and bringing landscape lessons into federation calculations moving forward.

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