Australian Journal of Public Administration

Cover image for Vol. 74 Issue 2

June 2015

Volume 74, Issue 2

Pages 101–256

  1. Research and Evaluation

    1. Top of page
    2. Research and Evaluation
    3. Response
    4. Research and Evaluation
    5. Review
    6. Controversies-Commentaries
    1. Learning about Learning: Discovering the Work of Policy (pages 101–111)

      David Adams, H. K. Colebatch and Christopher K. Walker

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12119

      This article reports on an exploratory study of policy practitioners' accounts of their work, how they learn to do it, and the place of academic work in developing their understanding and learning about policy work. We discuss what more might be done to facilitate learning about the work of policy.

  2. Response

    1. Top of page
    2. Research and Evaluation
    3. Response
    4. Research and Evaluation
    5. Review
    6. Controversies-Commentaries
  3. Research and Evaluation

    1. Top of page
    2. Research and Evaluation
    3. Response
    4. Research and Evaluation
    5. Review
    6. Controversies-Commentaries
    1. Haven't We Been This Way Before? Evaluation and the Impediments to Policy Learning (pages 114–127)

      Jenny Stewart and Wendy Jarvie

      Article first published online: 13 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12140

      We focus on a policy trial that was undertaken in acomplex and controversial policy field (Indigenous community development), with the avowedobjective of learning from experience in the field. We observe that despite significant implementation effort and quality evaluation, little systematic policy learning occurred.

    2. Residential Aged Care Policy in Australia – Are We Learning from Evidence? (pages 128–141)

      Richard Baldwin, Lynn Chenoweth and Marie dela Rama

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12131

      Analysis of ten years of census data sourced from the Australian Government reveals policy driven trends in the structure of the residential aged care industry in Australia that are inconsistent with the international evidence. The objective of the paper is to stimulate public debate on these trends.

    3. Politics of Evidence: The Communication of Evidence by ‘Stakeholders’ when Advocating for Tobacco Point-of-sale Display Bans in Australia (pages 142–150)

      Clinton Cenko and Mariastella Pulvirenti

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12138

      This paper presents findings from a qualitative study on the introduction of point of sale tobacco display bans in Australia in the late 2000s to provide an insight into the way this public policy was introduced and the way that evidence was used and communicated to influence the policy outcome.

    4. NSW Workers’ Compensation Reform: A Parody of Evidence-based Policy Making (pages 151–161)

      Sasha Holley, Louise Thornthwaite, Ray Markey and Sharron O'Neill

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12125

      This article advances research on the use of evidence in policymaking through examining changes to the New South Wales workers' compensation system since early 2012. The analysis highlights the limitations of building integrated, coherent evidence-based policy in a contentious policy area.

    5. Government with a Cast of Dozens: Policy Capacity Risks and Policy Work in the Northern Territory (pages 162–175)

      Dean Carson and Adam Wellstead

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12124

      A survey of 119 policy workers in the Northern Territory was conducted in 2013. The analysis examined four key policy work areas (policy activities, barriers, areas for improved policy capacity, nature of change in work environment). The survey findings offer some practical insights for managers.

    6. Implementing Joined-Up Government: Lessons from the Australian Social Inclusion Agenda (pages 176–186)

      Gemma Carey, Pauline McLoughlin and Brad Crammond

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12096

      Joined-up government' approaches have emerged in many industrialised countries as a means to tackle 'wicked' policy problems. Despite this, limited evidence exists concerning their implementation or effectiveness. The research investigated the implementation experiences of the Social Inclusion Agenda, and found that compatibility between goals, instrumentsand processes is critical to success.

    7. What Happened to Queensland's Disaster Management Arrangements?: From ‘Global Best Practice’ to ‘Unsustainable’ in 3 Years (pages 187–198)

      Tracey Arklay

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12122

      In three years Queensland's Disaster Management arrangements went from being cited as an exemplar of global best practice to being 'unsustainable'. This paper examines the political and administrative leadership of the state's disaster management agencies, contrasts the events of 2010-11 with those of 2013 and questions how Mick Keelty's review recommendations of structural solutions can overcome the cultural issues within agencies that he diagnosed.

    8. Effective Practices for Interagency Data Sharing: Insights from Collaborative Research in a Regional Intervention (pages 199–211)

      Pauline M. McGuirk, Phillip M. O'Neill and Kathleen J. Mee

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12098

      Data sharing adds considerable value to interagencyprograms which seek to tackle complex social problems. Yet data sharing is not easily enacted either technically or as a governance practice, especially considering the multiple formsof risk involved. This paper presents insights from a successful data sharing project in a major region in east coast Australia involving a federally funded research partnership between two universities and a number of human services agencies.

    9. Determining the Optimal Size of Local Government: The Case of Tasmanian Councils (pages 212–226)

      Rui Cunha Marques, Michael A. Kortt and Brian Dollery

      Article first published online: 13 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12151

      We estimated the optimal size of the most significant functions performed by Tasmanian councils between 1999 and 2008 using a non-parametric technique based on the shared input DEA model. The principal advantage of this technique is that it not only provides an overall estimate ofefficiency, but it also allows for the estimation of 'partial efficiencies' and 'cost shares' when one input is shared among multiple outputs.

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Research and Evaluation
    3. Response
    4. Research and Evaluation
    5. Review
    6. Controversies-Commentaries
    1. What Do We Talk About Now? Reflecting on Publications in AJPA 1970–2015 (pages 227–238)

      Catherine Althaus

      Article first published online: 23 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12150

      This article reflects on 45 years of articles published in the Australian Journal of Public Administration (AJPA), providing commentary not only on the journal's status and future but also the state of public administration in Australia. The analysis builds on a first study conducted in 1997, continuing the themes of institutional affiliation, subject matter and research methodology as key categories for AJPA article analysis. The context for the analysis is the advent of the journal's new editorial team. The article concludes that several opportunities present themselves for AJPA's future including performing a strategic stocktake of the discipline and debating its merits as well as marking out what might make for a peculiarly Australian form of public administration (if any) in the contemporary era.

  5. Controversies-Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Research and Evaluation
    3. Response
    4. Research and Evaluation
    5. Review
    6. Controversies-Commentaries
    1. The Promises and Pitfalls of Prime Provider Models in Service Delivery: The Next Phase of Reform in Australia? (pages 239–248)

      Wilma Gallet, Janine O'Flynn, Helen Dickinson and Siobhan O'Sullivan

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12120

      This article provides an overview of prime provider approaches to the delivery of public services and drawing on the limited research to date, poses questions that we view as being critical to the current debate. The aim is to provoke further discussion on the potential impact of prime provider models.

    2. Squaring the Virtuous Circle: Exploring the Potential of the ‘Five Cs’ (pages 249–256)

      John R. Butcher

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12121

      This paper reflects upon recent public debates concerning issues of social capital, social impact and corporate social responsibility. The paper asks whether the public policy discourse is at the threshold of a serious discussion of multilateral approaches to solving vexed social, economic and environmental problems.

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