Australian Journal of Public Administration

Cover image for Vol. 74 Issue 4

December 2015

Volume 74, Issue 4

Pages 391–516

  1. Garran Oration

    1. Top of page
    2. Garran Oration
    3. Editorial
    4. Special Issue: Federalism
    5. Research and Evaluation
    6. Invited Editorial
    7. Reviewer
  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Garran Oration
    3. Editorial
    4. Special Issue: Federalism
    5. Research and Evaluation
    6. Invited Editorial
    7. Reviewer
  3. Special Issue: Federalism

    1. Top of page
    2. Garran Oration
    3. Editorial
    4. Special Issue: Federalism
    5. Research and Evaluation
    6. Invited Editorial
    7. Reviewer
    1. Separating Sovereignty and Sharing Problems: Australian Federalism and the European Union (pages 406–418)

      Adrian Kay

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12173

      The concept of multi-level governance illuminates the capacity for, and barriers to, dynamism and innovation in the Australian federation. The focus is interactions between different jurisdictions at different spatial scales, showing that constitutional change in formal roles and responsibilities is not sufficient, perhaps not necessary, for reform of Australian federalism.

    2. Subsidiarity in the Australian Public Sector: Finding Pragmatism in the Principle (pages 419–434)

      Jacob Deem, Robyn Hollander and A J Brown

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12175

      We use survey data of current and former Australian public servants to demonstrate that subsidiarity as a principle is perceived differently by different levels of government, but that pragmatism provides a 'common language' for understanding the principle.

    3. Fixing Funding in the Australian Federation: Issues and Options for State Tax Reform (pages 435–447)

      Richard Eccleston and Helen Smith

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12176

      This paper outlines the tax and funding challenges facing states in the Australian federation. It argues that comprehensive reform including income, consumption and land taxes is required to improve the efficiency of the national tax system and to provide states and territories with adequate and sustainable funding.

    4. Housing in a Federation: From Wicked Problem to Complexity Cascade? (pages 448–466)

      James Walter and Carolyn Holbrook

      Article first published online: 26 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12174

      This article examines intergovernmental relations in the history of Australian housing policy and in relation to the federation reform process. It suggests that the engagement of multiple agencies and disparate policy domains in housing policy might be productively clarified by adopting the policy cascade approach from complexity theory.

    5. Intergovernmental Relations and the Role of Senior Officials: Two Case Studies and Some Lessons Learned (pages 467–483)

      Glyn Davis and Helen Silver

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12171

      The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) is the most important forum for intergovernmental relations in Australian federalism. Decision making processes in intergovernmental relations in Australia have been well documented in recent research, yet the role of senior officials in the COAG process is less often studied.

  4. Research and Evaluation

    1. Top of page
    2. Garran Oration
    3. Editorial
    4. Special Issue: Federalism
    5. Research and Evaluation
    6. Invited Editorial
    7. Reviewer
    1. Is There a Case for Mandating Directly Elected Mayors in Australian Local Government? Lessons from the 2012 Queensland Local Government Elections (pages 484–494)

      Bligh Grant, Brian Dollery and Michael A. Kortt

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12057

      Local governments systems have witnessed a trend toward directly elected mayors, yet debate has largely ignored problems associated with this. Examining the 2012 Queensland local government elections, this paper argues that amongst other contributing factors, direct mayoral election contributed to a significant diminution in the ensuing capacity of local governments.

    2. Learning Lessons from Disasters: Alternatives to Royal Commissions and Other Quasi-Judicial Inquiries (pages 495–508)

      Michael Eburn and Stephen Dovers

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12115

      With over 50 inquiries in 75 years, Australian communities continue to suffer from the impact of extreme events. This paper argues that it is time to do the post-event review in a different way and suggests some possible options for new approaches to learning lessons from tragedy.

  5. Invited Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Garran Oration
    3. Editorial
    4. Special Issue: Federalism
    5. Research and Evaluation
    6. Invited Editorial
    7. Reviewer
    1. Gender in Public Administration: Looking Back and Moving Forward (pages 509–515)

      Gemma Carey and Helen Dickinson

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12172

      In an online virtual issue, we explore the history of gender and feminism since AJPA. It is clear that two major silences exist in public administration concerning gender. The first is the place of women and gender equity within public service workforces. The second silence is the role that feminist theories could play in tackling contemporary public management challenges. We argue that there are particular contributions that feminist theories could make in relation to topics such as collaboration, boundary- spanning and skill requirements for future public sector workers. In this editorial we therefore look backwards and forwards, examining how female public sector workers are defined within state bureaucracy, and what feminism can bring to the functioning of this bureaucracy in the future.

  6. Reviewer

    1. Top of page
    2. Garran Oration
    3. Editorial
    4. Special Issue: Federalism
    5. Research and Evaluation
    6. Invited Editorial
    7. Reviewer

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