Applied Vegetation Science

Cover image for Vol. 17 Issue 1

January 2014

Volume 17, Issue 1

Pages 1–186

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Vegetation Survey
    6. List of Referees
    1. You have free access to this content
      Spatial models and plant traits for conservation and restoration (pages 1–3)

      Milan Chytrý, Alessandro Chiarucci, Valério D. Pillar and Meelis Pärtel

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12071

  2. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Vegetation Survey
    6. List of Referees
    1. You have free access to this content
      Problems with edges: tree lines as indicators of climate change (or not) (pages 4–5)

      Kerry D. Woods

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12077

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Elevational treelines are commonly seen as particularly important ecological ‘ecotones’ that should, according to models, respond sensitively to climate change. In this issue, Mathisen et al. report empirical analyses of two treelines that fail to show expected upward movement. This study points up both methodological and conceptual challenges in understanding ecological edges and in connecting general expectations to specific cases. The treeline shown here (Abies balsamea, on Mt. Jacques-Cartier in Québec, Canada) is thought to be atypically low due to the effects of snow avalanches. (Photo by Kerry Woods).

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Vegetation Survey
    6. List of Referees
    1. Fifty years of tree line change in the Khibiny Mountains, Russia: advantages of combined remote sensing and dendroecological approaches (pages 6–16)

      Ingrid E. Mathisen, Anna Mikheeva, Olga V. Tutubalina, Sigrun Aune and Annika Hofgaard

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12038

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      Subarctic treelines are commonly predicted to show pronounced advance in response to climate change. This study, combining remote sensing techniques and ground based age structure data, shows modest rates. Studies combining these methods minimize the risk of under- or overestimating potential advance.

    2. Changes in forest structure, fuels and potential fire behaviour since 1873 in the Lake Tahoe Basin, USA (pages 17–31)

      Alan H. Taylor, Anna M. Vandervlugt, R. Stockton Maxwell, Robert M. Beaty, Catherine Airey and Carl N. Skinner

      Version of Record online: 7 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12049

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      Logging and fire suppression in the Lake Tahoe Basin have increased forest density and potential for severe fires, especially in lower elevation forests. Forest restoration should reduce density, basal area, and shift species composition by thinning small diameter trees. Thinning will reduce potential for severe fire and periodic surface fuel treatments will be needed to maintain lower fuel loads.

    3. Assessing vegetation change using vegetation-plot databases: a risky business (pages 32–41)

      Milan Chytrý, Lubomír Tichý, Stephan M. Hennekens and Joop H.J. Schaminée

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12050

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      Vegetation-plot databases are sometimes used to assess temporal vegetation change, but such analyses may be incorrect because old and new records are usually taken at different sites. We assessed the accuracy of such analyses against the background of permanent-plot data. Our results demonstrate that vegetation-plot databases can often suggest false vegetation change, therefore they should be interpreted with utmost caution.

    4. Drought-induced woody plant mortality in an encroached semi-arid savanna depends on topoedaphic factors and land management (pages 42–52)

      Dirac Twidwell, Carissa L. Wonkka, Charles A. Taylor Jr, Chris B. Zou, Jeremiah J. Twidwell and William E. Rogers

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12044

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      We repeated a historical field experiment to compare rates of woody mortality resulting from recent droughts to the exceptional drought of 1951–1957. Mortality was greater following the more severe drought of the 1950s than recent flash droughts from 2000 to 2011. Long-term land management legacies interacted with localized differences in topoedaphic factors to drive patch-level shifts in woody vegetation following drought.

    5. Differences in spatial autocorrelation (SAc), plant species richness and diversity, and plant community composition in grazed and ungrazed grasslands along a moisture gradient, North Dakota, USA (pages 53–62)

      Lindsey M. Meyers, Edward S. DeKeyser and Jack E. Norland

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12040

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      Our study was conducted within plant communities in grasslands that were either grazed or ungrazed. We compared spatial autocorrelation to richness, Shannon diversity, and Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling. We found that disturbance and moisture level were reflected differently in the different analyses. Spatial autocorrelation is another tool that can be used by managers to analyze plant communities and make decisions.

    6. Use of multiple criteria in an ecological assessment of a prairie restoration chronosequence (pages 63–73)

      Michael J. Hansen and David J. Gibson

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12051

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      A chronosequence of restored prairies was evaluated to determine if benchmark levels of ecological fidelity had been achieved. Restoration success varied depending on the ecological attribute examined, but many prairies, especially those planted most recently with species-rich seed mixes, displayed high levels floristic quality. Our study can serve as a model for future research and assessment of restoration success.

    7. Seed addition via epizoochorous dispersal in restoration: an experimental approach mimicking the colonization of bare soil patches (pages 74–85)

      Linda Freund, Carsten Eichberg, Iris Retta and Angelika Schwabe

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12052

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      The potential of sheep to establish new plant populations on restoration sites via zoochory is often discussed, but has rarely been quantified. In a 6-year field experiment we have shown that nine of ten epizoochorously-dispersed species of sandy grassland became established and partly increased in abundance over time. For all study species spatial patterns were analysed.

    8. Burning season effects on the short-term post-fire vegetation dynamics of a Mediterranean heathland (pages 86–96)

      Blanca Céspedes, Belén Luna, Beatriz Pérez, Itziar R. Urbieta and José M. Moreno

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12053

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The short-term dynamics of a Mediterranean heathland were studied following early and late fire season burns. Burning season did not affect resprouting regeneration but affected seeding regeneration through changes in fire severity and litter cover, delaying much seedling emergence by one year in stands burned in late season. These results could have implications for managing this highly flammable vegetation.

    9. Old Pinus ponderosa growth responses to restoration treatments, climate and drought in a southwestern US landscape (pages 97–108)

      Chris C. Erickson and Kristen M. Waring

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12056

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We compared old Pinus ponderosa growth in a restoration area (‘treated’), and neighboring untreated area. Old trees in the treated area grew faster after recent drought years than in the untreated area and diameter growth increased following treatment, though not immediately. Treatments removing neighboring trees may be critical in maintaining old trees in the landscape, particularly under future climate change.

    10. The role of native woody species in the restoration of Campos Rupestres in quarries (pages 109–120)

      Soizig Le Stradic, Elise Buisson, Daniel Negreiros, Pascal Campagne and Geraldo Wilson Fernandes

      Version of Record online: 10 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12058

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      This study demonstrates the practical efficiency of using some shrub species native to harsh tropical ecosystems, such as Campos Rupestres (mosaic of grasslands with shrubby rocky outcrops), to restore quarries in terms of their transplantation success four and half year after the beginning of the experiment and their effects on both the establishment of herbaceous species and soil conservation.

    11. Edge effects of linear canopy openings on understorey communities in a lowland Atlantic tropical forest (pages 121–128)

      Pablo V. Prieto, Jerônimo B.B. Sansevero, Mário L. Garbin, João M.A. Braga and Pablo J.F.P. Rodrigues

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12043

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We investigated whether the creation of linear canopy openings causes edge effects on understory communities in a Brazilian Atlantic forest. Species richness was not affected by edges. Disturbance-tolerant species were more abundant in edges than in forest interiors, while disturbance-sensitive species did not show differences among treatments. Such effects were distinct from those found at typical edges of forest fragments.

  4. Vegetation Survey

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Vegetation Survey
    6. List of Referees
    1. Timberline meadows along a 1000-km transect in NW North America: species diversity and community patterns (pages 129–141)

      Viktoria Wagner, Toby Spribille, Stefan Abrahamczyk and Erwin Bergmeier

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12045

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      The timberline meadows of the NW North American cordillera are among the largest natural meadow formations worldwide. However, human activities and climate change are putting this vegetation type under new pressures. In a first pan-regional survey we found compositional turnover with latitude, with species richness increasing with higher soil pH and towards the northern and southern ends of our gradient.

    2. Phytosociology and ecology of the high-alpine to subnival scree vegetation of N and NW Iran (Alborz and Azerbaijan Mts.) (pages 142–161)

      Jalil Noroozi, Wolfgang Willner, Harald Pauli and Georg Grabherr

      Version of Record online: 6 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12031

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this study we investigated the vegetation of high alpine and subnival scree habitats in high mountains of N and NW Iran. Altitude, aspect and soil conditions are the major ecological factors determining species composition of the studied vegetation types. We present a new classification scheme arranging the communities in one class, two orders, three alliances and ten associations.

    3. Correspondence in forest species composition between the Vegetation Map of Africa and higher resolution maps for seven African countries (pages 162–171)

      Roeland Kindt, Jens-Peter B. Lillesø, Paulo van Breugel, Michael Bingham, Sebsebe Demissew, Cornell Dudley, Ib Friis, Francis Gachathi, James Kalema, Frank Mbago, Heriel N. Moshi, John W. Mulumba, Mary Namaganda, Henry J. Ndangalasi, Christopher K. Ruffo, Védaste Minani, Ramni H. Jamnadass and Lars Graudal

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12055

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      The article shows that the resolution and information content of the 1:5,000,000 vegetation map of Africa developed by Frank White can be directly improved by adding information from higher resolution maps available for Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia. Statistical evidence is provided for the existence of a distinct Afromontane phytochorion (biogeographical region).

    4. Savanna woody vegetation classification – now in 3-D (pages 172–184)

      Jolene T. Fisher, Barend F.N. Erasmus, Ed T.F. Witkowski, Jan van Aardt, Konrad J. Wessels and Gregory P. Asner

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12048

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We developed a three-dimensional woody vegetation structural classification for savannas to capture the context of biogeophysical drivers. LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data were used to calculate Canopy Cover, Sub-canopy Cover, Canopy Layers, Simpson's Diversity Index and Cohesion for 0.25 ha grid cells based on vertical and horizontal spatial arrangement of vegetation. The classification provides a sensitive change detection method.

  5. List of Referees

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Commentary
    4. Original Articles
    5. Vegetation Survey
    6. List of Referees
    1. List of Referees (pages 185–186)

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/avsc.12075

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