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First manic episode associated with use of human chorionic gonadotropin for obesity: a case report

Authors

  • Marsal Sanches,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Harris County Psychiatric Center, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA
    2. University of Texas Center of Excellence on Mood Disorders, Houston, TX, USA
    • Corresponding author:

      Marsal Sanches, M.D., Ph.D.

      Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

      University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

      UT Center of Excellence on Mood Disorders

      1541 East Road

      Houston, TX 77054

      USA

      Fax: 713-486-2553

      E-mail: marsal.sanches@uth.tmc.edu

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  • Teresa Pigott,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Harris County Psychiatric Center, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA
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  • Alan C Swann,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Harris County Psychiatric Center, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA
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  • Jair C Soares

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Harris County Psychiatric Center, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA
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Abstract

Background

Although highly controversial, the treatment of obesity with exogenous human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) remains popular in the USA. We report the case of a patient whose first manic episode was associated with the use of HCG for weight loss.

Case report

A 32-year-old female patient was admitted to our psychiatric inpatient unit due to a two-week history of manic symptoms. She had no previous history of manic or hypomanic episodes and had completed a 45-day course of sublingual HCG for weight loss immediately prior to the onset of the manic episode. The patient was treated with lithium carbonate and aripiprazole, and progressed with improvement in the symptoms.

Conclusion

While it is not possible to definitively link the HCG use to the development of mania, available evidence suggests that HCG may have a contributing role in triggering manic symptomatology.

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