BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 6

June 2013

Volume 35, Issue 6

Pages 497–579

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Idea revisited
    8. Insights & Perspectives
    9. Prospects & Overviews
    10. Errata
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 6∕2013

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370061

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Changing the landscape may lead to disease. On pages 533–543 of this issue, Malte Spielmann and Stefan Mundlos discuss how structural variations in regulatory parts of the genome can interfere with normal gene regulation and – by doing so – cause disease. The upper part of the cover shows a wild type situation in which a chromosomal looping mechanism involving the binding of transcription factors (TF) brings the enhancer (red) close to the promoter of its target gene leading to tissue-specifi c expression. In the lower part, the enhancer is duplicated, resulting in disturbed gene expression. Other structural variations that can change the regulatory landscape include the deletion∕mutation of enhancer elements or their inversion, and the deletion of insulators (green bar in the cover image). Cover by Malte Spielmann and Stefan Mundlos.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Idea revisited
    8. Insights & Perspectives
    9. Prospects & Overviews
    10. Errata
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
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      BioEssays 6∕2013

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370062

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Idea revisited
    8. Insights & Perspectives
    9. Prospects & Overviews
    10. Errata
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Idea revisited
    8. Insights & Perspectives
    9. Prospects & Overviews
    10. Errata
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 6∕2013

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370064

  5. Insights & Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Idea revisited
    8. Insights & Perspectives
    9. Prospects & Overviews
    10. Errata
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. Idea to watch

      You have free access to this content
  6. Idea revisited

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Idea revisited
    8. Insights & Perspectives
    9. Prospects & Overviews
    10. Errata
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
    2. You have free access to this content
      Era of the tiny titans: microRNAs (page 502)

      Sugunavathi Sepramaniam and Kandiah Jeyaseelan

      Article first published online: 10 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300025

  7. Insights & Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Idea revisited
    8. Insights & Perspectives
    9. Prospects & Overviews
    10. Errata
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. Ideas & Speculations

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Aggregation of polyQ-extended proteins is promoted by interaction with their natural coiled-coil partners (pages 503–507)

      Spyros Petrakis, Martin H. Schaefer, Erich E. Wanker and Miguel A. Andrade-Navarro

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Toxic polyQ proteins form beta-sheet aggregates (A). A partner with a coiled-coil (CC) conformation interacting with the toxic protein at its polyQ domain, enhances aggregation (B). On the contrary, a non-CC partner that interacts with the toxic protein at a different domain than its polyQ, suppresses protein aggregation (B).

  8. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Idea revisited
    8. Insights & Perspectives
    9. Prospects & Overviews
    10. Errata
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. Recently in press

      If microbial ecosystem therapy can change your life, what's the problem? (pages 508–512)

      Grace Ettinger, Jeremy P. Burton and Gregor Reid

      Article first published online: 10 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300015

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      If a simple replacement of your gut microbiota by someone else's could improve your health and ability to function, would you do it? How would you select the donor and would the “authorities” let you perform the transplant? The age of the microbiome is here, but is society ready?

    2. Review essays

      Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate: Targeted production and signaling (pages 513–522)

      Yue Sun, Narendra Thapa, Andrew C. Hedman and Richard A. Anderson

      Article first published online: 10 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200171

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Site-directed synthesis of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI4,5P2) at distinct sub-cellular compartments mediates a variety of events, such as migration, cell-cell adhesion, transcription and vesicle trafficking. PI4,5P2 regulated processes are critical for function at the cellular level, which is evident in neurons, platelet, and macrophage function.

    3. Late endosomal and lysosomal trafficking during integrin-mediated cell migration and invasion : Cell matrix receptors are trafficked through the late endosomal pathway in a way that dictates how cells migrate (pages 523–532)

      Elena Rainero and Jim C. Norman

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200160

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Following endocytosis, integrins are delivered to early endosomes, where they can recruit sorting nexin 17 (SNX17) and move to recycling endosomes. Alternatively integrins can be transported from early endosomes to late endosomes where they can be either degraded or recycled to the cell surface via a CLIC3-dependent mechanism.

    4. Structural variations, the regulatory landscape of the genome and their alteration in human disease (pages 533–543)

      Malte Spielmann and Stefan Mundlos

      Article first published online: 29 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200178

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The ENCODE data indicate that over 80% of the genome is biochemically active. The regulatory landscape of the genome is divided into topological domains containing cis-regulatory elements: enhancers, silencers, and insulators. Non-coding CNVs and mutations have to be taken into consideration for the investigation of human disease.

    5. From reactivation of latent HIV-1 to elimination of the latent reservoir: The presence of multiple barriers to viral eradication (pages 544–552)

      Liang Shan and Robert F. Siliciano

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200170

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A stable latent reservoir for HIV-1 in resting memory CD4+ T cells presents a major barrier to a cure of HIV-1 infection. This paper summarizes the recent progress in purging the latent reservoir and discusses the challenging issues that remain unresolved.

    6. Problems & Paradigms

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Pausing for thought: Disrupting the early transcription elongation checkpoint leads to developmental defects and tumourigenesis (pages 553–560)

      Barbara H. Jennings

      Article first published online: 10 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200179

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Animal studies reveal that correct regulation of promoter proximal pausing is critical for a diverse range of biological pathways during embryo development and also for health in adult life. This regulation facilitates fine control of gene expression levels and may also act as a barrier to uncontrolled cell proliferation.

    7. A simple model to explain evolutionary trends of eukaryotic gene architecture and expression : How competition between splicing and cleavage/polyadenylation factors may affect gene expression and splice-site recognition in eukaryotes (pages 561–570)

      Francesco Catania and Michael Lynch

      Article first published online: 9 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200127

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We propose a scenario wherein factors that regulate pre-mRNA splicing and 3′-end formation compete for access to binding sites within introns and 3′ UTRs. Dynamic molecular tradeoffs determine the outcome of these antagonistic interactions and mediate the selection of exons and transcription termination sites.

    8. How epigenetic mutations can affect genetic evolution: Model and mechanism (pages 571–578)

      Filippos D. Klironomos, Johannes Berg and Sinéad Collins

      Article first published online: 12 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200169

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Heritable epigenetic mutations have higher mutation and reversion rates than genetic mutations, but can still be acted on by natural selection. We use a model to show why pure epigenetic variation can speed up adaptation and lead to phenotype-first evolution, even on time scales where genetic evolution also happens.

  9. Errata

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Idea revisited
    8. Insights & Perspectives
    9. Prospects & Overviews
    10. Errata
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      Erratum (page 579)

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370054

      This article corrects:

      Microtubule dynamic instability: A new model with coupled GTP hydrolysis and multistep catastrophe

      Vol. 35, Issue 5, 452–461, Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013

  10. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Idea revisited
    8. Insights & Perspectives
    9. Prospects & Overviews
    10. Errata
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BiotecVisions 2013, May (pages A1-A8)

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370065

  11. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Idea revisited
    8. Insights & Perspectives
    9. Prospects & Overviews
    10. Errata
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370066

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