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Figure S1. The ecological niche model (ENM) showing the potential geographical distribution of Anatolian ground squirrels (Spermophilus xanthoprymnus) under present (1950–2000) bioclimatic conditions. The visible area in maps is 25° to 46°E and 35° to 43°N. A, the ENM based on all 19 bioclimatic variables is shown. Open circles indicate the occurrence records. B, the ENM based on the four most significant bioclimatic variables (‘annual mean temperature’, Bio1; ‘mean temperature of driest quarter’, Bio9; ‘annual precipitation’, Bio12; and ‘precipitation of warmest quarter’, Bio18; see Supporting information, Table S2) is shown. Note that both the ENMs gave qualitatively similar predictions for present bioclimatic conditions.

Figure S2. The ecological niche model (ENM) showing the potential geographical distribution of Anatolian ground squirrels (Spermophilus xanthoprymnus) under present (1950–2000) bioclimatic conditions. The ENM was developed within the mask (delineated by red line) adjusted so as not to include southern Anatolia and then projected to the study area. The visible area in maps is 25° to 46°E and 35° to 43°N. Open circles indicate the occurrence records.

Figure S3. The response curves produced by models created using only one of the four most significant bioclimatic variables (‘annual mean temperature’, Bio 1; ‘mean temperature of driest quarter’, Bio 9; ‘annual precipitation’, Bio12; and ‘precipitation of warmest quarter’, Bio18; see Supporting information, Table S2) in predicting the present potential distribution of Anatolian ground squirrels (Spermophilus xanthoprymnus) at a time.

Table S1. Bioclimatic data used in ecological niche modelling.

Table S2. Estimates of the relative contributions of bioclimatic variables to the ecological niche model (ENM) through the percentage contribution and permutation importance. Values shown are means over the ten-fold cross-validation runs. The most significant bioclimatic variables in predicting the present potential distribution of Anatolian ground squirrels (Spermophilus xanthoprymnus) are shown in bold. For abbreviations of bioclimatic variables, see Supporting information, Table S1; http://www.worldclim.org/bioclim.

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