British Journal of Dermatology

Cover image for Vol. 168 Issue 2

February 2013

Volume 168, Issue 2

Pages 232–460

  1. Snippets

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review article
    5. Systematic review
    6. Cutaneous biology
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Book Review
    10. News and Notices
    1. You have free access to this content
  2. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review article
    5. Systematic review
    6. Cutaneous biology
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Book Review
    10. News and Notices
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. Review article

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review article
    5. Systematic review
    6. Cutaneous biology
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Book Review
    10. News and Notices
    1. The role of the palatine tonsils in the pathogenesis and treatment of psoriasis (pages 237–242)

      S.L. Sigurdardottir, R.H. Thorleifsdottir, H. Valdimarsson and A. Johnston

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11215.x

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  There is a well-established association between streptococcal tonsillitis and psoriasis, yet studies on the efficacy of tonsillectomy for psoriasis have never been afforded mainstream attention.

      What does this study add?

      •  We have reviewed tonsil immunology and how tonsil infection could lead to skin disease.
      •  We have also reviewed all available reports of the outcome of tonsillectomy on psoriasis, including a recent observer-blinded prospective study, and identified patients who may potentially benefit from this procedure.
  4. Systematic review

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review article
    5. Systematic review
    6. Cutaneous biology
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Book Review
    10. News and Notices
    1. Systemic therapy with immunosuppressive agents and retinoids in hidradenitis suppurativa: a systematic review (pages 243–252)

      J.L. Blok, S. van Hattem, M.F. Jonkman and B. Horváth

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12104

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      • The immune system is important in the pathogenesis of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS).
      • Treatment of HS is difficult and usually comprises antibiotics, antiandrogens, laser treatment or surgery.
      • Systemic immunosuppressive and retinoid therapies are frequently prescribed; however, little is known about which agents are most effective.

      What does this study add?

      • Infliximab, adalimumab and acitretin are the most effective systemic agents, although the quality of evidence for acitretin is lower than that for infliximab and adalimumab.
  5. Cutaneous biology

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review article
    5. Systematic review
    6. Cutaneous biology
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Book Review
    10. News and Notices
    1. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia severity is associated with cowhage-induced itch (pages 253–256)

      G.A. Bin Saif, A. McMichael, S.G. Kwatra, Y.-H. Chan and G. Yosipovitch

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12043

      What’s already known about this topic?

      • Patients with central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) often complain of intense itch, pain and burning sensations. However, the neural component of these skin sensations has not been assessed.

      What does this study add?

      • This study demonstrates a significant correlation between cowhage-induced itch intensity and the severity of CCCA.
      • As cowhage signals through the protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2, these results suggest a putative role for the PAR-2 pathway in CCCA-associated skin sensation. Examining for itch and other dysaesthesias in patients with CCCA is of vital importance to dermatologists in assessing disease severity.
  6. Original articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review article
    5. Systematic review
    6. Cutaneous biology
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Book Review
    10. News and Notices
    1. Clinical and laboratory investigations

      Reflectance confocal microscopy as a new tool in the in vivo evaluation of desquamative gingivitis: patterns in mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris and oral lichen planus (pages 257–264)

      S.S. Alessi, M.M.S. Nico, J.D. Fernandes and S.V. Lourenço

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12021

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      • Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is beginning to be studied in inflammatory and blistering skin diseases. However, use of this method has not been studied in the mucosal manifestations of such diseases.
      • Desquamative gingivitis is a peculiar clinical manifestation of pemphigus vulgaris, mucous membrane pemphigoid and lichen planus that presents difficulties in diagnosis.

      What does this study add?

      • This study is the first to show RCM images of gingival lesions.
      • Our findings correlated closely with the histopathological findings of pemphigus vulgaris, mucous membrane pemphigoid and lichen planus.
    2. Clinical features and histological findings are potential indicators of activity in lesions of common vitiligo (pages 265–271)

      L. Benzekri, Y. Gauthier, S. Hamada and B. Hassam

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12034

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Until now, the global assessment for the stability of vitiligo lesions, using three indicators (history, Koebner phenomenon and test grafting), has often proven imprecise and is difficult to perform in daily clinical practice.

      What does this study add?

      •  We propose that a simple clinical examination, including use of a Wood’s lamp, may allow reliable and efficient evaluation of the stability of vitiligo lesions.
    3. Primary upper-limb lymphoedema (pages 272–276)

      S. Vignes, M. Arrault, A. Yannoutsos and M. Blanchard

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12024

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      Primary upper-limb lymphoedema (ULL) is a very rare disorder; no publication has specifically addressed this form.

      What does this study add?

      This report is the first to describe the clinical and lymphoscintigraphic features of patients with primary ULL, and to discuss its differences from primary lower-limb lymphoedema.

    4. Assessing the influence of actinic keratosis on patients’ quality of life: the AKQoL questionnaire (pages 277–283)

      S. Esmann, G.R. Vinding, K.B. Christensen and G.B.E. Jemec

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12036

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Qualitative studies have shown that actinic keratosis (AK) influences quality of life (QoL) negatively.
      •  General QoL questionnaires do not seem to capture the full impact of AK.
      •  Patients’ self-reported outcomes are increasingly used in studies.

      What does this study add?

      •  The study provides a specific QoL questionnaire for patients with AK.
      •  Three domains seem to be particularly important for patients with AK: function, emotions and control.
    5. Dermoscopy of discoid lupus erythematosus (pages 284–288)

      A. Lallas, Z. Apalla, I. Lefaki, E. Sotiriou, E. Lazaridou, D. Ioannides, D. Tiodorovic-Zivkovic, T. Sidiropoulos, D. Konstantinou, V. Di Lernia, G. Argenziano and I. Zalaudek

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12044

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) represents the most common subtype of cutaneous lupus erythematosus.
      •  Dermoscopy and videodermoscopy have been shown to aid the differentiation of scalp DLE from other causes of scarring alopecia, but limited data exist concerning dermoscopic criteria of DLE on other locations, such as the face, trunk and extremities.

      What does this study add?

      •  Our study provides new insights into the dermoscopic variability of DLE located on the face, trunk and extremities.
    6. Increased risk of psoriasis following chronic rhinosinusitis without nasal polyps: a population-based matched-cohort study (pages 289–294)

      J.J. Keller, C.-S. Wu and H.-C. Lin

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12047

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Although chronic rhinosinusitis without nasal polyps (CRSsNP) and psoriasis both share immunological disturbances as pathological factors, no study has investigated the risk for psoriasis among patients with CRSsNP.
      •  Only two studies investigating the immune responses of these conditions have been conducted to date.

      What does this study add?

      •  The incidence rate of psoriasis during the 5-year follow-up period was 1·41 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1·14–1·71] per 1000 person-years and 0·69 (95% CI 0·59–0·81) per 1000 person-years for subjects with and without CRSsNP, respectively.
      •  The adjusted hazard ratio for psoriasis during the 5-year follow-up period for subjects with CRSsNP compared with controls was 2·01 (95% CI 1·54–2·62).
    7. Dermatophyte identification in skin and hair samples using a simple and reliable nested polymerase chain reaction assay (pages 295–301)

      J. Verrier, L. Krähenbühl, O. Bontems, M. Fratti, K. Salamin and M. Monod

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12015

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing assays have been developed for the direct identification of dermatophytes from dermatological samples but without distinction between onychomycosis and other tinea.
      •  The failure to isolate a dermatophyte in cultures frequently occurs, especially in cases of previous antifungal therapy.
      •  The problem with direct PCR dermatophyte identification in skin and hair differs from that in onychomycosis because a small amount of material is generally collected from patients for mycological analysis.

      What does this study add?

      •  A nested PCR assay was found to be necessary for sensitive sequencing and dermatophyte identification in tinea capitis and tinea corporis.
      •  Improved sensitivity of dermatophyte identification was obtained as it was possible to identify the dermatophyte when the fungus failed to grow in cultures.
      •  This assay is especially suitable for tinea capitis as the appropriate treatment depends on the incriminated dermatophyte species.
    8. STAT1 expression and activation is increased in lesional psoriatic skin (pages 302–310)

      A. Hald, R.M. Andrés, M.L. Salskov-Iversen, R.B. Kjellerup, L. Iversen and C. Johansen

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12049

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  The expression of STAT1 is increased in lesional psoriatic skin.
      •  STAT1 has an increased nuclear expression in psoriatic epidermis.
      •  STAT1 can be phosphorylated on two different phosphorylation sites: a tyrosine 701 site and a serine 727 site.
      •  STAT1 is involved in the regulation of interferon-responsive genes.

      What does this study add?

      •  The phosphorylation level of STAT1(Tyr701) and STAT1(Ser727) is increased in lesional psoriatic skin.
      •  The two kinases, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and protein kinase C-δ, are involved in the phosphorylation of STAT1 in cultured human keratinocytes.
    9. You have free access to this content
      Impact of Toll-like receptor-4 and tumour necrosis factor gene polymorphisms in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa (pages 311–317)

      A. Savva, T. Kanni, G. Damoraki, A. Kotsaki, S. Giatrakou, I. Grech, A. Katoulis, E. Papadavid and E.J. Giamarellos-Bourboulis

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12105

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder; immunological dysfunctions and familial predisposition are involved in disease pathogenesis.
      •  Treatment with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists has shown promising effect in certain studies enrolling a limited number of patients.

      What does this study add?

      •  The presence of the −238 polymorphism of the TNF gene is associated with disease susceptibility.
      •  Carriage of single nucleotide polymorphisms of the promoter region of the TNF gene is related to disease severity and unfavourable responses to TNF antagonists.
    10. Cutaneous allergy

      Prevalence, incidence rates and persistence of contact allergy and allergic contact dermatitis in The Odense Adolescence Cohort Study: a 15-year follow-up (pages 318–325)

      C.G. Mortz, C. Bindslev-Jensen and K.E. Andersen

      Version of Record online: 30 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12065

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  To date no studies have evaluated incidence rates and persistence of contact allergy and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in an unselected population from adolescence to adulthood.

      What does this study add?

      •  This is the first prospective, population-based investigation of both contact allergy and ACD developing from adolescence to adulthood.
      •  High incidence rates of contact allergy and ACD were found in young adults 15 years after leaving primary school.
      •  Nickel was still the most common contact allergen, and new sensitizations occurred despite the European Union nickel regulation. Fragrance mix I was a poor marker for history of eczematous skin reaction to perfumed products.
    11. Impact of atopic dermatitis and loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene on the development of occupational irritant contact dermatitis (pages 326–332)

      M.J. Visser, L. Landeck, L.E. Campbell, W.H.I. McLean, S. Weidinger, F. Calkoen, S.M. John and S. Kezic

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12083

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •Filaggrin gene (FLG) loss-of-function mutations increase the risk of developing atopic dermatitis (AD).

      It has been reported that FLG mutations are associated with irritant contact dermatitis (ICD); however, it is unclear whether they are an independent risk factor or work through AD.

      What does this study add?

      FLG mutations are associated with ICD even when adjusted for AD.

      • Individuals with concurrent FLG mutations [odds ratio (OR) 1·61] and AD (OR 2·89) are at the highest risk of developing ICD (combined OR 4·7).

    12. Dermatological surgery

      Comparison of negative pressure wound therapy and secondary intention healing after excision of acral lentiginous melanoma on the foot (pages 333–338)

      B.H. Oh, S.H. Lee, K. A. Nam, H.B. Lee and K.Y. Chung

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12099

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Melanoma in dark-skinned individuals often develops in an acral lentiginous fashion on the foot and wide excision usually results in a substantial defect.

      What does this study add?

      •  Negative pressure wound therapy is an excellent therapeutic option for wounds after wide excision of melonoma on the foot, with acceptable functional and cosmetic outcomes.
    13. Dermatopathology

      The expression of dual-specificity phosphatase 1 mRNA is downregulated in lesional psoriatic skin (pages 339–345)

      R.B. Kjellerup, C. Johansen, K. Kragballe and L. Iversen

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12020

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity plays an important role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.
      •  Dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1) is an important negative regulator of p38 MAPK activity.

      What does this study add?

      •  The expression of DUSP1 mRNA was found to be downregulated in psoriasis vulgaris but not in atopic dermatitis.
      •  The downregulation of DUSP1 mRNA in psoriasis vulgaris is very likely to be of pathogenic relevance to the maintenance of inflammation.
    14. Epidemiology and health services research

      Factors affecting sunscreen use and sun avoidance in a U.S. national sample of organ transplant recipients (pages 346–353)

      E.L. Mihalis, A. Wysong, W.J. Boscardin, J.Y. Tang, M.M. Chren and S.T. Arron

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11213.x

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Organ transplant recipients (OTRs) are at increased risk of skin cancer.
      •  Many OTRs report inadequate photoprotective behaviours.
      •  Younger age may predict sunscreen use after transplantation.

      What does this study add?

      •  This is the first U.S. national study examining factors associated with photoprotection in OTRs before and after transplantation.
      •  It is the first study to include only OTRs with no prior history of skin cancer.
      •  It provides a better understanding of risk factors for poor photoprotection.
      •  It provides a model for identifying patients in need of extended counselling.
    15. Recognition of need in health care consultations: a qualitative study of people with psoriasis (pages 354–361)

      P.A. Nelson, C.A. Chew-Graham, C.E.M. Griffiths, L. Cordingley and on behalf of the IMPACT Team

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11217.x

      What’s already known about this topic?

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        Psoriasis is a common, life-long inflammatory condition, impacting on quality of life and psychosocial functioning.
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        Research indicates some patient dissatisfaction with psoriasis management and reluctance to consult health care practitioners.

      What does this study add?

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        The demands of psoriasis are largely unacknowledged in health care consultations.
      • • 
        Practitioners are perceived as lacking knowledge and expertise, failing to manage psoriasis as a long-term condition.
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        Such lack of support discourages participants from consulting about psoriasis.
    16. Paediatric dermatology

      Lichen sclerosus and atopy in boys: coincidence or correlation? (pages 362–366)

      K. Becker, V. Meissner, W. Farwick, R. Bauer and M.R. Gaiser

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11201.x

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Comorbidity between lichen sclerosus (LS) and atopy has been described in girls but so far it has never been studied in a controlled fashion.
      •  In an attempt to investigate this phenomenon in boys we performed an epidemiological prospective case–control study.

      What does this study add?

      •  We found a significant comorbidity between LS and atopic skin diathesis in boys.
      •  Atopy seems to be a priming precondition for the development of LS.
    17. Photobiology

      Sun behaviour after cutaneous malignant melanoma: a study based on ultraviolet radiation measurements and sun diary data (pages 367–373)

      L.W. Idorn, P. Datta, J. Heydenreich, P.A. Philipsen and H.C. Wulf

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12066

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      • Patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) can lower their risk of a further CMM by limiting recreational sun exposure.

      • Objective measurements are needed to substantiate advice about sun behaviour.

      What does this study add?

      • Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) measurements and sun diary data showed a lower UVR exposure dose and a higher protection level in recently diagnosed patients with CMM compared with matched controls.

      • Data from patients diagnosed in the past indicate that this behaviour is not lasting.

    18. Therapeutics

      An assessment of adalimumab efficacy in three Phase III clinical trials using the European Consensus Programme criteria for psoriasis treatment goals (pages 374–380)

      U. Mrowietz, K. Kragballe, K. Reich, C.E.M. Griffiths, Y. Gu, Y. Wang and S.J. Rozzo

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11214.x

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  A variety of medical organizations and national agencies have published guidelines and recommendations for the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis.
      •  The European Consensus Programme (ECP) recently developed and published the first pan-European consensus statement on treatment goals for moderate to severe psoriasis.
      •  The results of the ECP included an emphasis on evaluation of both clinical disease status and patient quality of life following treatment, as well as recommendations for continuation or modification of therapy based on whether the treatment goals had been achieved.

      What does this study add?

      •  Using the ECP treatment goals, we assessed the treatment efficacy of adalimumab in patients participating in Phase III clinical trials who met the ECP criteria for moderate to severe psoriasis.
      •  Over 70% of patients in these trials attained treatment goals; of these, > 93% of patients had a > 75% improvement in their Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score.
      •  Results support the use of the ECP treatment goals that were consistent for all three trials and indicate that adalimumab induced highly efficacious, generally consistent responses and would inform continued, unmodified therapy in > 70% of patients with psoriasis.
    19. Oral cyclophosphamide without corticosteroids to treat mucous membrane pemphigoid (pages 381–390)

      E.M. Munyangango, C. Le Roux-Villet, S. Doan, F. Pascal, I. Soued, M. Alexandre, M. Heller, N. Lièvre, F. Aucouturier, F. Caux, L. Laroche and C. Prost-Squarcioni

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12041

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Most studies on cyclophosphamide (CYC) treatment of mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) have examined the effect of combined oral CYC and corticosteroids on ocular involvement.
      •  Some severe complications were observed, including malignancies, infectious diseases and infertility.

      What does this study add?

      •  We report the efficacy of CYC without steroids, evaluated with scoring of all sites potentially affected by MMP.
      •  The most common adverse event was transient lymphopenia without sepsis.
    20. Secukinumab induction and maintenance therapy in moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II regimen-finding study (pages 402–411)

      P. Rich, B. Sigurgeirsson, D. Thaci, J.-P. Ortonne, C. Paul, R.E. Schopf, A. Morita, K. Roseau, E. Harfst, A. Guettner, M. Machacek and C. Papavassilis

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12112

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      What’s already know about this topic?

      •  Conventional systemic therapies for plaque psoriasis have not fully met patient needs.
      •  Biologics, although effective and generally well tolerated, have a still-developing long-term safety profile.
      •  Monoclonal antibodies against interleukin (IL)-17A have shown early promise.

      What does this study add?

      •  In this regimen-finding study, the investigational anti-IL-17 monoclonal secukinumab (150 mg subcutaneously) showed significant efficacy for induction and maintenance treatment and was well tolerated in moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.
      •  Secukinumab may offer new therapeutic options in plaque psoriasis.
    21. Efficacy and safety of secukinumab in the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II dose-ranging study (pages 412–421)

      K.A. Papp, R.G. Langley, B. Sigurgeirsson, M. Abe, D.R. Baker, P. Konno, S. Haemmerle, H.J. Thurston, C. Papavassilis and H.B. Richards

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12110

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      • Conventional systemic therapies for plaque psoriasis have not fully met patient needs; biologics, although effective and generally well tolerated, have a still-developing long-term safety profile.
      • Monoclonal antibodies against interleukin (IL)-17A have shown early promise.

      What does this study add?

      • In this study, the investigational anti-IL-17 monoclonal secukinumab (3 × 150 mg, 3 × 75 mg subcutaneously) produced significantly higher rates of 75% improvement from baseline in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score vs. placebo, and was well tolerated in moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.
      • Secukinumab may offer new therapeutic options in plaque psoriasis.
    22. Concise communication

      A novel missense mutation in the gene FZD6 underlies autosomal recessive nail dysplasia (pages 422–425)

      S.I. Raza, N. Muhammad, S. Khan and W. Ahmad

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11203.x

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      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Autosomal recessive isolated nail dysplasia manifesting with claw-shaped nails was mapped on chromosome 8q22.3.
      •  Two mutations in the gene FZD6, mapped on chromosome 8q22.3, were reported recently.

      What does this study add?

      •  The missense mutation, identified here, is only the third mutation detected in the gene FZD6.
      •  This study further verifies that mutation in the gene FZD6 results in claw-shaped nails.
  7. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review article
    5. Systematic review
    6. Cutaneous biology
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Book Review
    10. News and Notices
    1. BRAF mutation analysis of only one metastatic lesion can restrict the treatment of melanoma: a case report (pages 428–430)

      E. Richtig, D. Schrama, S. Ugurel, I. Fried, A. Niederkorn, C. Massone and J.C. Becker

      Version of Record online: 27 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11121.x

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    2. Treatment of patients with acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis (pages 430–432)

      Y. Ohshima, T. Yanagishita, K. Ito, Y. Tamada, N. Nishimura, Y. Inukai, S. Iwase, J. Sugenoya and D. Watanabe

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11112.x

    3. Xanthelasma palpebrarum: a new adverse reaction to intradermal fillers? (pages 437–439)

      C. D’Acunto, M. Pazzaglia, B. Raone, C. Misciali, L. Badiali, I. Neri and A. Patrizi

      Version of Record online: 7 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11152.x

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    4. Cutaneous Mycobacterium haemophilum infection in a patient receiving infliximab for psoriasis (pages 446–447)

      A. Aslam, R.L. Green, L. Motta, M. Ghrew, C.E.M. Griffiths and R.B. Warren

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11164.x

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    5. The hair dye allergy self-test: considerations for treating physicians (page 448)

      J.P. Thyssen, I.R. White, C. Lidén and J.D. Johansen

      Version of Record online: 27 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11163.x

    6. Incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer in Ireland (page 452)

      M. Bennett, H. Comber and S. Deady

      Version of Record online: 27 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11172.x

    7. Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) is no longer idiopathic: time for an update (pages 455–456)

      M. Maurer, C. Bindslev-Jensen, A. Gimenez-Arnau, K. Godse, C.E.M. Grattan, M. Hide, A.P. Kaplan, M. Makris, F.E.R. Simons, Z. Zhao, T. Zuberbier, M.K. Church and on behalf of GA2LEN Taskforce on unmet needs in urticaria

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11171.x

    8. A severe familial phenotype of Ichthyosis Curth–Macklin caused by a novel mutation in the KRT1 gene (pages 456–458)

      D.J. Fonseca, R.F. Rojas, J.I. Vergara, X. Ríos, C. Uribe, L. Chávez, F. Velandia, C.I. Vargas, C.M. Restrepo and P. Laissue

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11181.x

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  8. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review article
    5. Systematic review
    6. Cutaneous biology
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Book Review
    10. News and Notices
  9. News and Notices

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Commentaries
    4. Review article
    5. Systematic review
    6. Cutaneous biology
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Book Review
    10. News and Notices

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