British Journal of Dermatology

Cover image for British Journal of Dermatology

April 2013

Volume 168, Issue 4

Pages i–i, 683–921, e1–e6

  1. Snippets

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. News and Notices
    10. Errata
    11. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    12. Abstracts
    1. You have free access to this content
      April 2013 (page i)

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12299

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. News and Notices
    10. Errata
    11. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    12. Abstracts
    1. Time for a ‘joint’ approach? (pages 683–684)

      R.B. Warren, P.S. Helliwell and H. Chinoy

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12170

  3. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. News and Notices
    10. Errata
    11. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    12. Abstracts
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. Putting papers into practice

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. News and Notices
    10. Errata
    11. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    12. Abstracts
  5. Review articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. News and Notices
    10. Errata
    11. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    12. Abstracts
    1. Why does allergic contact dermatitis exist? (pages 692–699)

      J.P. McFadden, P. Puangpet, D.A. Basketter, R.J. Dearman and I. Kimber

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12145

    2. BRAF mutation testing algorithm for vemurafenib treatment in melanoma: recommendations from an expert panel (pages 700–707)

      D. Gonzalez, L. Fearfield, P. Nathan, P. Tanière, A. Wallace, E. Brown, C. Harwood, J. Marsden and S. Whittaker

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12248

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Mutations in the BRAF gene have been identified as key drivers of melanoma cells and are found in around 50% of cutaneous melanomas.
      •  Vemurafenib (Zelboraf®) is the first licensed inhibitor of mutated BRAF and offers a new first-line option for patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma who harbour BRAF mutations.
      •  Vemurafenib was developed in conjunction with a companion diagnostic, the cobas® 4800 BRAF V600 Mutation Test.

      What does this study add?

      •  Evidence-based recommendations to facilitate the implementation of BRAF mutation testing and targeted therapy in patients with metastatic melanoma in the U.K.
  6. Original articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. News and Notices
    10. Errata
    11. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    12. Abstracts
    1. Clinical and laboratory investigations

      Assessment of clinical parameters associated with mutational status in metastatic malignant melanoma: a single-centre investigation of 141 patients (pages 708–716)

      M. Schlaak, A. Bajah, T. Podewski, N. Kreuzberg, W. von Bartenwerffer, E. Wardelmann, S. Merkelbach-Bruse, R. Büttner, C. Mauch and P. Kurschat

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12140

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Approximately 50% of melanomas arising from intermittently sun-exposed areas harbour activating BRAF mutations. These patients can be successfully treated with selectively acting BRAF inhibitors.
      •  Mutations in the KIT gene are more prevalent in mucosal or acrolentiginous melanoma.
      •  A recent publication showed a positive correlation between activating BRAF mutations and younger age as well as with the number of melanocytic naevi.

      What does this study add?

      •  We provide a clinical characterization of 141 patients with metastatic melanoma with or without activating BRAF mutations. Signs of photodamage and previous ultraviolet exposure did not correlate with mutational status.
      •  In stage IV disease, survival of patients with a BRAF mutation was identical to that of patients with BRAF mutation-negative tumours.
      •  The low frequency of KIT mutations in Europe has not been described before.
    2. Serum periostin levels are correlated with progressive skin sclerosis in patients with systemic sclerosis (pages 717–725)

      Y. Yamaguchi, J. Ono, M. Masuoka, S. Ohta, K. Izuhara, Z. Ikezawa, M. Aihara and K. Takahashi

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12117

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Periostin is a matricellular protein known as a modulator of wound healing and fibrosis. However, the role of periostin in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis has not been elucidated.

      What does this study add?

      •  Periostin is highly expressed in affected skin and serum in patients with systemic sclerosis.
      •  Increased serum periostin levels correlate with the skin fibrosis score, suggesting a possible biomarker of disease severity.
    3. Prognosis of generalized bullous fixed drug eruption: comparison with Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (pages 726–732)

      S. Lipowicz, P. Sekula, S. Ingen-Housz-Oro, Y. Liss, B. Sassolas, A. Dunant, J.-C. Roujeau and M. Mockenhaupt

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12133

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Generalized bullous fixed drug eruption (GBFDE) is a rare variant of FDE.
      •  It is often confused with toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and is considered less severe than TEN.

      What does this study add?

      •  Comparison of GBFDE cases with Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) or SJS/TEN cases matched for age and extent of skin detachment was carried out.
      •  The mortality rate was slightly but not significantly lower for GBFDE than for cases of SJS or SJS/TEN.
      •  The reputation of the benign nature of GBFDE should be reconsidered.
    4. Radiation-induced melanoma-associated leucoderma, systemic antimelanoma immunity and disease-free survival in a patient with advanced-stage melanoma: a case report and immunological analysis (pages 733–738)

      H.E. Teulings, E.P.M. Tjin, K.J. Willemsen, G. Krebbers, C.J. van Noesel, E.H. Kemp, L. Nieuweboer-Krobotova, J.P.W. van der Veen and R.M. Luiten

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12136

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Melanoma-associated leucoderma (MAL) can occur in patients with melanoma.
      •  MAL is mostly seen upon immunotherapy and is associated with favourable clinical outcome.
      •  Although melanoma is considered a radioresistant tumour, radiotherapy may have a beneficial effect as an adjuvant therapy.

      What does this study add?

      •  This is the first case report of MAL development upon radiotherapy in a long term surviving melanoma patient with brain metastasis, who did not receive any immunotherapy.
      •  Radiotherapy may induce specific antimelanoma immunity and thereby act as a form of immunotherapy.
      •  T cells are able to infiltrate brain metastasis tissue, possibly contributing to the ongoing full remission of the patient.
    5. Propranolol induces apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells through downregulation of CD147 (pages 739–748)

      W. Xie, H. Xie, F. Liu, W. Li, J. Dan, Y. Mei, L. Dan, X. Xiao, J. Li and X. Chen

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12193

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Propranolol is the most promising therapy for complicated infantile haemangiomas (IHs).
      •  Beta blockade induces apoptosis in cultured capillary endothelial cells, and the rate of apoptosis increases during the involution phase.

      What does this study add?

      •  Our studies demonstrate that propranolol-induced apoptosis may be mediated through the downregulation of CD147 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.
      •  This study highlights a novel step in propranolol action and suggests a new potential target for the treatment of IHs.
    6. Serum chemerin is increased in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis and normalizes following treatment with infliximab (pages 749–755)

      P. Gisondi, V. Lora, C. Bonauguri, A. Russo, G. Lippi and G. Girolomoni

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12118

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Chronic plaque psoriasis is frequently associated with obesity, which is a metabolic and inflammatory disorder.
      •  Adipokines are involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and they are biomarkers of obesity-related inflammation and cardiovascular risk.
      •  Chemerin is pathogenetically expressed in psoriatic lesional skin.

      What does this study add?

      •  Patients with psoriasis have higher blood levels of adipokines, including chemerin and resistin compared with controls matched by age, sex and body mass index.
      •  A reduction of these serum adipokines is observed in patients treated with infliximab.
    7. Autoimmune thyroid disease in vitiligo: multivariate analysis indicates intricate pathomechanisms (pages 756–761)

      A. Gey, A. Diallo, J. Seneschal, C. Léauté-Labrèze, F. Boralevi, T. Jouary, A. Taieb and K. Ezzedine

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12166

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Vitiligo/nonsegmental vitiligo (NSV) is often associated with thyroid dysimmunity.

      What does this study add?

      •  Female sex and disease duration are strongly associated with the presence of autoimmune thyroid disease in vitiligo/NSV.
      •  Regular screening for thyroid function, especially in women, is strongly recommended in these patients.
    8. Cutaneous allergy

      The role of glutathione S-transferase and claudin-1 gene polymorphisms in contact sensitization: a cross-sectional study (pages 762–770)

      K. Ross-Hansen, A. Linneberg, J.D. Johansen, L.-G. Hersoug, C. Brasch-Andersen, T. Menné and J.P. Thyssen

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12126

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Polymorphisms in the gene encoding the tight-junction protein claudin (CLDN)-1 were recently associated with atopic dermatitis.
      •  Polymorphisms in the glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes have been associated with contact sensitization, but their role remains unclear.

      What does this study add?

      • CLDN1 polymorphisms may affect the propensity to develop contact sensitization to common haptens.
      •  Polymorphisms in the GST genes do not seem to be of importance in contact sensitization when assessed in a general population.
    9. Dermatopathology

      Increased expression of cell adhesion molecule 1 by mast cells as a cause of enhanced nerve–mast cell interaction in a hapten-induced mouse model of atopic dermatitis (pages 771–778)

      M. Hagiyama, T. Inoue, T. Furuno, T. Iino, S. Itami, M. Nakanishi, H. Asada, Y. Hosokawa and A. Ito

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12108

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Enhanced sensory nerve–skin mast cell interaction is involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD).

      What does this study add?

      •  In a hapten-induced AD mouse model, lesional mast cells were found to express much higher levels of cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1) than nonlesional mast cells.
      •  CADM1 on mast cells enhanced sensory nerve–mast cell adhesion and communication in vitro in a dose-dependent manner.
      •  Increased CADM1 expression in mast cells appears to play a role in the pathogenesis of AD.
    10. Epidemiology and health services research

      You have free access to this content
      Prognostic subclassifications of T1 cutaneous melanomas based on ulceration, tumour thickness and Clark’s level of invasion: results of a population-based study from the Swedish Melanoma Register (pages 779–786)

      J. Lyth, J. Hansson, C. Ingvar, E. Månsson-Brahme, P. Naredi, U. Stierner, G. Wagenius, C. Lindholm and for the Swedish Melanoma Study Group

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12095

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Previous studies about prognostic factors for thin melanoma have shown the impact of tumour ulceration, tumour thickness and Clark’s level of invasion.

      What does this study add?

      •  This study verifies the importance of the prognostic factors above, and also suggests better ways to combine these factors to create distinct subgroups.
      •  Further, this study includes a large, population-based group of patients with more than 15 years of follow-up data, and the results give accurate information about prognosis for this patient group.
    11. Quality of life in Dutch women with lichen sclerosus (pages 787–793)

      C.A. Lansdorp, K.E. van den Hondel, I.J. Korfage, M.J. van Gestel and W.I. van der Meijden

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12137

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Earlier research has shown impaired sexual functioning and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with lichen sclerosis (LS).

      What does this study add?

      •  This is the first study that uses validated dermatological and generic questionnaires to investigate HRQoL in patients with LS.
      •  Patients with LS experience a moderately impaired HRQoL.
      •  Compared with the general population and other chronic diseases, the impact on HRQoL is considerable.
    12. Maternal employment and atopic dermatitis in children: a prospective cohort study (pages 794–801)

      I.J. Wang, H.J. Wen, T.L. Chiang, S.J. Lin, P.C. Chen and Y.L. Guo

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12195

      What’s already known about this topic?

      • Whether maternal occupations affect the development of atopic disorders in children remains to be elucidated.

      What does this study add?

      •  In addition to work stress during pregnancy, working in professional or technical occupations increased the risk of childhood atopic dermatitis.
      •  Avoiding occupational exposure for pregnant women is important for prevention of atopic disorders in children.
    13. Comparison of three screening tools to detect psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis (CONTEST study) (pages 802–807)

      L.C. Coates, T. Aslam, F. Al Balushi, A.D. Burden, E. Burden-The, A.R. Caperon, R. Cerio, C. Chattopadhyay, H. Chinoy, M.J.D. Goodfield, L. Kay, S. Kelly, B.W. Kirkham, C.R. Lovell, H. Marzo-Ortega, N. McHugh, R. Murphy, N.J. Reynolds, C.H. Smith, E.J.C. Stewart, R.B. Warren, R. Waxman, H.E. Wilson and P.S. Helliwell

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12190

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  A number of screening questionnaires have been developed to detect psoriatic arthritis in people with psoriasis.
      •  Each questionnaire has shown good and largely equivalent performance, in terms of specificity and sensitivity, in the development cohorts.
      •  What is needed is a head-to-head study in a new cohort of patients with psoriasis.

      What does this study add?

      •  Each of the questionnaires performed worse in this new cohort of patients in secondary care, with no significant differences between them.
      •  Both sensitivity and specificity were worse, although the study design was likely to underestimate the specificity and overestimate the sensitivity.
      •  Screening questionnaires such as these will detect other musculoskeletal diseases in addition to psoriatic arthritis and additional information may be needed to enhance their specificity.
      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum

      Vol. 168, Issue 6, 1376, Article first published online: 5 JUN 2013

    14. Genetics

      Epidermolysis bullosa simplex with PLEC mutations: new phenotypes and new mutations (pages 808–814)

      A. Charlesworth, C. Chiaverini, J. Chevrant-Breton, M. DelRio, A. Diociaiuti, R.P. Dupuis, M. El Hachem, B. Le Fiblec, A.M. Sankari-Ho, A. Valhquist, E. Wierzbicka, J.P. Lacour and G. Meneguzzi

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12202

      What’s already known about this topic?

      • Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) with muscular dystrophy is generally associated with mutations in the central rod domain of plectin, whereas EBS with pyloric atresia (EBS-PA) is usually lethal and linked to mutations within the plectin distal domains.

      What does this study add?

      • We report rare clinical EBS phenotypes associated with 11 novel genetic mutations in the plectin gene, and specifically an as-yet unreported form of nonlethal EBS-PA presenting favourable evolution with ageing.

    15. Photobiology

      Effect of narrowband ultraviolet B phototherapy on melanocytic naevi (pages 815–819)

      C.Y. Lin, A. Oakley, M. Rademaker, S. Hill and A. Yung

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12168

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Melanocytic naevi can undergo morphological changes following exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation.

      What does this study add?

      •  Around half of naevi exposed to a course of narrowband (NB)-UVB underwent size or morphological changes.
      •  Following a course of NB-UVB treatment, reticular naevi changed by displaying blurring and merging of lines, whereas globular naevi displayed increased colour intensity and number of dots.
      •  Naevi that enlarged tended to revert to pretreatment size 3 months after discontinuation of phototherapy.
    16. Therapeutics

      Efficacy of ustekinumab in refractory palmoplantar pustular psoriasis (pages 820–824)

      C. Morales-Múnera, E. Vilarrasa and L. Puig

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12150

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  There is no standard treatment for palmoplantar pustular psoriasis (PPPP), and dermatologists have used treatments for psoriasis with varied results.
      •  Innovative biological agents have recently been introduced in the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis vulgaris, and their efficacy has been shown in nonpustular palmoplantar psoriasis in sporadic case reports and very small series.

      What does this study add?

      •  Ustekinumab appears to be an effective and safe therapeutic option in PPPP, leading to complete or nearly complete resolution of the lesions, with a significant improvement in patients’ health-related quality of life.
    17. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Long-term (6 and 12 months) follow-up of two prospective, randomized, controlled phase III trials of photodynamic therapy with BF-200 ALA and methyl aminolaevulinate for the treatment of actinic keratosis (pages 825–836)

      T. Dirschka, P. Radny, R. Dominicus, H. Mensing, H. Brüning, L. Jenne, L. Karl, M. Sebastian, C. Oster-Schmidt, W. Klövekorn, U. Reinhold, M. Tanner, D. Gröne, M. Deichmann, M. Simon, F. Hübinger, G. Hofbauer, G. Krähn-Senftleben, F. Borrosch, K. Reich, C. Berking, P. Wolf, P. Lehmann, M. Moers-Carpi, H. Hönigsmann, K. Wernicke-Panten, S. Hahn, G. Pabst, D. Voss, M. Foguet, B. Schmitz, H. Lübbert, R.-M. Szeimies and AK-CT002 and AK-CT003 Study Groups

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12158

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  BF-200 ALA is a stable nanoemulsion-based gel formulation of 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of actinic keratosis (AK), which demonstrated significantly higher efficacy compared with a registered methyl aminolaevulinate (MAL) cream.

      What does this study add?

      •  This study gives 6- and 12-month follow-up results of two pivotal phase III studies with BF-200 ALA for PDT of AK in comparison to placebo and a registered MAL cream.
      •  It provides a comparison of recurrence rates after use of different light sources for PDT of AK.
    18. Propranolol in a case series of 174 patients with complicated infantile haemangioma: indications, safety and future directions (pages 837–843)

      D.J.J. Hermans, C.G. Bauland, J. Zweegers, I.M. van Beynum and C.J.M. van der Vleuten

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12189

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  After the discovery of its efficacy in infantile haemangioma (IH) in 2008, propranolol is becoming the first-choice treatment for these benign tumours with (impending) complications.
      •  Only small series with limited follow-up have been published to date.

      What does this study add?

      •  This study provides prospectively collected data on indications and safety in a large patient group with IH in a single centre.
      •  ‘Real clinical practice’ data are given to guide future use of propranolol in IH. Based on its apparent safety, prescription of propranolol may go beyond strictly medical indications.
    19. Long-term safety of ustekinumab in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis: final results from 5 years of follow-up (pages 844–854)

      K.A. Papp, C.E.M. Griffiths, K. Gordon, M. Lebwohl, P.O. Szapary, Y. Wasfi, D. Chan, M.-C. Hsu, V. Ho, P.D. Ghislain, B. Strober, K. Reich and on behalf of the PHOENIX 1, PHOENIX 2 and ACCEPT Investigators

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12214

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Short-term studies of ustekinumab in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis indicated a favourable benefit–risk profile. Long-term safety evaluations are needed to inform patient management decisions.

      What does this study add?

      •  This report evaluated the largest psoriasis clinical trial cohort to date with the longest duration of follow-up. Safety outcomes after 5 years of ustekinumab treatment are consistent with shorter-term reports and are generally comparable with observations from studies of other biologics in patients with psoriasis.
    20. Concise communications

      Association of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms with severe atopic dermatitis in adults (pages 855–858)

      G. Heine, N. Hoefer, A. Franke, U. Nöthling, R.R. Schumann, L. Hamann and M. Worm

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12077

      What’s already known about this topic?

      • A role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) is suggested by epidemiological and experimental data.
      • Genetic variants in the vitamin D receptor gene (VDR) are known, but their presence has not been investigated in patients with AD.

      What does this study add?

      • We show that, in patients with severe AD, specific single nucleotide polymorphisms in the VDR gene are significantly over-represented. This implies the need to consider the VDR genotype of probands in vitamin D-related clinical studies examining vitamin D in AD, and the need for further mechanistic research.
    21. Concise Communication

      Risk factors for abscess formation in patients with superficial cellulitis (erysipelas) of the leg (pages 859–863)

      D. Picard, A. Klein, S. Grigioni and P. Joly

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12148

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Complications of leg cellulitis lengthen the stay in hospital.
      •  Advanced age, diabetes mellitus and elevated leucocytosis at baseline are risk factors for general complications in patients with cellulitis of the leg.
      •  Abscess is a common local complication of leg cellulitis.
      •  Little is known about risk factors for abscess formation in leg cellulitis.

      What does this study add?

      •  Risk factors for abscess formation in patients with leg cellulitis were identified.
      •  Delayed management of patients is associated with occurrence of abscess in leg cellulitis.
    22. Concise communications

      An investigation of rheumatoid arthritis loci in patients with early-onset psoriasis validates association of the REL gene (pages 864–866)

      F.R. Ali, A. Barton, R.L.I. Smith, J. Bowes, E. Flynn, M. Mangino, V. Bataille, J.P. Foerster, J. Worthington, C.E.M. Griffiths and R.B. Warren

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12106

      What’s already known about this topic?

      •  Psoriasis is a complex genetic disease for which 19 genetic susceptibility loci have been identified in caucasians.
      •  Phenotypically diverse autoimmune diseases share common underlying genetic susceptibility loci and molecular pathways.
      •  There is epidemiological evidence that rheumatoid arthritis occurs more frequently in patients with psoriasis.
      •  Association of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility variants has been previously reported with psoriasis, including association of the IL2/IL21 locus and the REL gene.

      What does this study add?

      •  By targeting rheumatoid arthritis loci in a U.K. cohort of patients with early-onset psoriasis, we have independently validated the REL gene as being associated with psoriasis.
    23. Does it look like melanoma? A pilot study of the effect of sunless tanning on dermoscopy of pigmented skin lesions (pages 867–870)

      J. Dahlén Gyllencreutz, K. Bengsson Boström and K. Terstappen

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12194

      What’s already known about this topic?

      • Little is known about the effect of sunless tanning products on dermoscopy, but two earlier case reports showed that they can cause new dermoscopic features.

      What does this study add?

      • We show that sunless tanning products containing dihydroxyacetone can cause new dermoscopic features in facial pigmented skin lesions that imitate early lentigo maligna, as follicular pigmentation temporarily appears.
  7. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. News and Notices
    10. Errata
    11. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    12. Abstracts
    1. Stabilization of multiple metastatic epithelioid sarcoma under treatment with sunitinib malate (pages 871–873)

      P. Penot, J.-D. Bouaziz, M. Battistella, D. Kerob, C. Pagès, C. Vilmer, N. Basset-Seguin, N. Madjessli, C. Comte, C. Farges, M. Bagot, C. le Maignan and C. Lebbé

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12038

    2. Vitamin D status in patients with bullous pemphigoid (pages 873–874)

      S. Tukaj, E. Schmidt, A. Recke, R.J. Ludwig, D. Zillikens, C. Tukaj and M. Kasperkiewicz

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12037

    3. Concurrence of bullous pemphigoid and herpetiform pemphigus with IgG antibodies to desmogleins 1/3 and desmocollins 1–3 (pages 879–881)

      C. Ohata, H. Koga, K. Teye, N. Ishii, T. Hamada, T. Dainichi, M. Furumura, M. Sato, H. Sueki and T. Hashimoto

      Article first published online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12019

    4. CD8+ Sézary syndrome with interleukin-22 production modulated by bacterial sepsis (pages 881–883)

      T. Shimauchi, K. Sasada, Y. Kito, T. Mori, M. Hata, T. Fujiyama, T. Ito, S. Hirakawa and Y. Tokura

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12051

    5. Absence of MYD88 L265P mutation in blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (pages 883–884)

      G. Fiandrino, M. Arra, R. Riboni, M. Lucioni, E. Dallera, L. Arcaini, E. Berti and M. Paulli

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12061

    6. Characterization of a malignant T-cell line established from a rare case of CD8+CD56+ Sézary syndrome (pages 885–887)

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      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12058

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      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12093

    8. Second primary melanomas on treatment with vemurafenib: reply from the authors (pages 888–889)

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      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12094

    9. A difficult case of dermatitis artefacta requiring surgical intervention (pages 889–891)

      R.T. Woolf, A.P. Bewley, R.E. Taylor, A. D’Souza and S.R. Hoque

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12086

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      H. Cabrera, M. Hermida, E. Griffa, S. García and M. Elías Costa

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12084

    11. Naevus marginatus revisited: a combined organoid and nonorganoid epidermal naevus caused by HRAS mutation (pages 892–894)

      L. Groesser, T. Vogt, R. Happle, E. Herschberger, M. Mickler, M. Landthaler and C. Hafner

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    12. Rivaroxaban prevents painful cutaneous infarctions in livedoid vasculopathy (pages 898–899)

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  8. News and Notices

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    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Review articles
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    11. Reviewer Acknowledgement
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  9. Errata

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
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    6. Review articles
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    1. You have free access to this content
      Errata (page 914)

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12282

      This article corrects:

      Assessing the influence of actinic keratosis on patients’ quality of life: the AKQoL questionnaire

      Vol. 168, Issue 2, 277–283, Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013

    2. You have free access to this content
      Errata (page 914)

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12321

      This article corrects:

      Treatment of severe psoriasis with biological therapies in patients with viral hepatitis B and C

      Vol. 168, Issue 3, 461–462, Article first published online: 28 FEB 2013

  10. Reviewer Acknowledgement

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. News and Notices
    10. Errata
    11. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    12. Abstracts
  11. Abstracts

    1. Top of page
    2. Snippets
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. News and Notices
    10. Errata
    11. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    12. Abstracts

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