British Journal of Dermatology

Cover image for Vol. 169 Issue 1

July 2013

Volume 169, Issue 1

Pages i–i, 1–232

  1. Editor's Choice

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Original articles
    9. Clinical and Laboratory Investigations
    10. Original articles
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and notices
    1. Editor's Choice (page i)

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12475

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Original articles
    9. Clinical and Laboratory Investigations
    10. Original articles
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and notices
    1. You have free access to this content
      Commissioned scholarly reviews in dermatology (page 1)

      A. Anstey and T. Bleiker

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12453

      Corrected by:

      Errata: Errata

      Vol. 169, Issue 3, 727, Article first published online: 30 AUG 2013

  3. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Original articles
    9. Clinical and Laboratory Investigations
    10. Original articles
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and notices
  4. Putting papers into practice

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Original articles
    9. Clinical and Laboratory Investigations
    10. Original articles
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and notices
  5. Scholarly reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Original articles
    9. Clinical and Laboratory Investigations
    10. Original articles
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and notices
    1. You have free access to this content
    2. You have free access to this content
      Pathogenesis of infantile haemangioma (pages 12–19)

      S. Greenberger and J. Bischoff

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12435

    3. You have free access to this content
  6. Review articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Original articles
    9. Clinical and Laboratory Investigations
    10. Original articles
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and notices
    1. The Dermatitis Family Impact questionnaire: a review of its measurement properties and clinical application (pages 31–46)

      S.R. Dodington, M.K.A. Basra, A.Y. Finlay and M.S. Salek

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12232

      What’s already known about this topic?

      • The quality of life of family members may be severely affected by having a child with atopic dermatitis.

      • A simple questionnaire, the Dermatitis Family Impact (DFI) questionnaire, can measure this impact.

      What does this study add?

      • Previously scattered information about the use of the DFI in 50 clinical studies has been collated.

      • Satisfactory aspects of its validation include test–retest reliability, internal consistency, sensitivity to change, and cross-correlation to other measures.

      • No studies were identified describing minimal important difference, validated score bandings, dimensionality, factor structure or differential item functioning.

    2. Is chronic plaque psoriasis triggered by microbiota in the skin? (pages 47–52)

      L. Fry, B.S. Baker, A.V. Powles, A. Fahlen and L. Engstrand

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12322

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Psoriasis is an immune-mediated disease involving both the innate and adaptive immune systems in genetically susceptible individuals.
      • Microorganisms have been identified in the blood, skin and tonsils of patients with psoriasis, and beta-haemolytic Streptococcus in the tonsils has been strongly linked to the precipitation of guttate psoriasis.
      • Microbiota in the skin have been implicated in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis.

      What does this study add?

      • This review summarizes the current knowledge of the location and identity of, and immune response to, microorganisms in psoriasis.
      • Based on this information, the proposal that psoriasis is triggered by microorganisms in the skin via the innate and adaptive immune systems is presented.
    3. Systemic treatments for basal cell carcinoma (BCC): the advent of dermato-oncology in BCC (pages 53–57)

      F.R. Ali and J.T. Lear

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12311

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Vismodegib, a hedgehog pathway inhibitor, has been licensed in the U.S.A. for treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC).

      What does this study add?

      • Vismodegib has demonstrated efficacy in cases of locally advanced and metastatic BCC and in individuals with hereditary basal cell naevus (Gorlin) syndrome.
      • Side-effects of vismodegib are frequent and considerable.
      • Follow-up studies are needed to assess the role of hedgehog inhibitors in the management of BCC.
  7. Original articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Original articles
    9. Clinical and Laboratory Investigations
    10. Original articles
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and notices
    1. Clinical and laboratory investigations

      You have free access to this content
      Is confocal microscopy a valuable tool in diagnosing nodular lesions? A study of 140 cases (pages 58–67)

      C. Longo, F. Farnetani, S. Ciardo, A.M. Cesinaro, E. Moscarella, G. Ponti, I. Zalaudek, G. Argenziano and G. Pellacani

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12259

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Nodular lesions pose a diagnostic challenge because nodular melanoma may simulate all kinds of melanocytic and nonmelanocytic lesions.

      What does this study add?

      • Although reflectance confocal microscopy has a limited laser depth penetration, it is a powerful tool in diagnosing nodular lesions showing high diagnostic accuracy for nodular melanoma.
    2. Platelet activation: a link between psoriasis per se and subclinical atherosclerosis – a case–control study (pages 68–75)

      H.M.A. Saleh, E.A.S. Attia, A.M. Onsy, A.A. Saad and M.M.M. Abd Ellah

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12285

      What's already known about this topic?

      • The association between psoriasis and increased risk of atherosclerosis is due to metabolic syndrome.
      • Pathomechanisms of both psoriasis and atherosclerosis may involve platelet activation.
      • Impaired brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation is related to atherosclerosis.

      What does this study add?

      • There is an increased atherosclerosis risk in patients with psoriasis per se due to chronic inflammation and platelet activation.
      • Measurement of flow-mediated dilatation and mean platelet volume in patients with psoriasis for assessing subclinical atherosclerosis and platelet activation, respectively, is rather inaccurate.
  8. Clinical and Laboratory Investigations

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Original articles
    9. Clinical and Laboratory Investigations
    10. Original articles
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and notices
    1. The surface area of the hand and the palm for estimating percentage of total body surface area: results of a meta-analysis (pages 76–84)

      J. Rhodes, C. Clay and M. Phillips

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12290

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Hand surface area (HSA) and palm surface area (PSA) as percentages of total body surface area (TBSA) are commonly used to estimate surface area involvement.
      • Commonly used estimates are HSA equalling 1% TBSA and PSA equalling 0·5% TBSA.

      What does this study add?

      • For adults, HSA is 0·87% TBSA, 13% lower than the accepted value of 1% TBSA. Body mass index, sex, age and ethnicity affect this value. The accepted value of PSA equalling 0·5% TBSA is accurate.
      • It may be more accurate to use PSA to estimate surface area involvement in adults. Patient variables may affect this estimate.
  9. Original articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Original articles
    9. Clinical and Laboratory Investigations
    10. Original articles
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and notices
    1. Clinical and laboratory investigations

      Dermoscopy of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: a study of 15 cases (pages 85–90)

      J. Bernard, N. Poulalhon, G. Argenziano, S. Debarbieux, S. Dalle and L. Thomas

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12318

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is a rare cutaneous malignancy in which low clinical specificity often leads to delay in diagnosis. To date, the dermoscopic presentation of DFSP has not been addressed.

      What does this study add?

      • This preliminary work identifies six dermoscopic features frequently encountered in DFSP, and raises the question of the potential of dermoscopy for the diagnosis of this condition.
    2. Dermoscopic patterns of melanoma metastases: interobserver consistency and accuracy for metastasis recognition (pages 91–99)

      J. Costa, K. Ortiz-Ibañez, G. Salerni, V. Borges, C. Carrera, S. Puig and J. Malvehy

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12314

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Dermoscopy helps to identify both benign and malignant lesions.
      • In the literature, several dermoscopic features of cutaneous metastases of malignant melanoma (CMMM) are described.

      What does this study add?

      • We describe five characteristic dermoscopic patterns – blue naevus-like, naevus-like, vascular, angioma-like and unspecific patterns – to help classify CMMM, obtaining good sensitivity and specificity between different readers.
    3. Dermatopathology

      The n- vs. u-serration is a learnable criterion to differentiate pemphigoid from epidermolysis bullosa acquisita in direct immunofluorescence serration pattern analysis (pages 100–105)

      J.B. Terra, J.M. Meijer, M.F. Jonkman and G.F.H. Diercks

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12308

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Serration pattern analysis by routine direct immunofluorescence (DIF) shows linear n-serration or linear u-serration immunodepositions along the epidermal basement membrane zone.

      What does this study add?

      • We are the first to describe that the recognition of n- and u-serrated DIF patterns is easy to learn with instruction. Our online test can be used worldwide to increase the experience with DIF serration pattern analysis, and the standard use will ensure more accurate diagnosis of patients with a subtype of pemphigoid so that treatment can be optimized.
    4. Evaluation of MYC status in oral lichen planus in patients with progression to oral squamous cell carcinoma (pages 106–114)

      S. Segura, E. Rozas-Muñoz, A. Toll, G. Martín-Ezquerra, E. Masferrer, B. Espinet, M. Rodriguez, T. Baró, C. Barranco and R.M. Pujol

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12303

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Malignant transformation of oral lichen planus (OLP) to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is controversial.
      • Clinical and histological features of OLP lesions have limited prognostic value.

      What does this study add?

      • OLP lesions from patients with progression to OSCC show MYC gains and C-MYC overexpression, not present in OLP lesions from patients without evolution to OSCC.
      • Determining MYC status on some OLP lesions may predict a subgroup of patients with a higher risk of progression to OSCC.
    5. Genetics

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      Phenotypic spectrum of epidermolysis bullosa associated with α6β4 integrin mutations (pages 115–124)

      H. Schumann, D. Kiritsi, M. Pigors, I. Hausser, J. Kohlhase, J. Peters, H. Ott, L. Hyla-Klekot, E. Gacka, A.L. Sieron, M. Valari, L. Bruckner-Tuderman and C. Has

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12317

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) with pyloric atresia (PA) is a rare EB type caused by mutations in the genes coding for α6β4 integrin or plectin, disrupting the hemidesmosome adhesion complex.
      • A reduced life expectancy is predicted in most cases of EB with PA.
      • α6β4 integrin gene mutations are not always associated with PA.

      What does this study add?

      • This study identifies 10 novel ITGB4 and ITGA6 mutations causing a spectrum of phenotypes, ranging from mild skin blistering to a lethal multisystem disorder with skin, urinary and gastrointestinal involvement.
      • Urinary tract involvement is relatively common (five out of eight cases in this study).
      • Low levels of α6β4 integrin are sufficient for hemidesmosomal integrity and are associated with a mild skin phenotype.
    6. Paediatric dermatology

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      Propranolol-resistant infantile haemangiomas (pages 125–129)

      S. Caussé, H. Aubert, M. Saint-Jean, E. Puzenat, A.-C. Bursztejn, C. Eschard, E. Mahé, A. Maruani, J. Mazereeuw-Hautier, I. Dreyfus, J. Miquel, C. Chiaverini, O. Boccara, S. Hadj-Rabia, J.-F. Stalder, S. Barbarot and on behalf of the Groupe de Recherche Clinique en Dermatologie Pédiatrique

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12417

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Although propranolol has been shown to manage infantile haemangiomas effectively, some rare resistant lesions exist.

      What does this study add?

      • Propranolol-resistant infantile haemangiomas are rare: 10/1130 (0·9%) in our study.
      • Resistance was observed in proliferative- and post-proliferative-phase haemangiomas.
    7. Therapeutics

      You have free access to this content
      Synergism between narrowband ultraviolet B phototherapy and etanercept for the treatment of plaque-type psoriasis (pages 130–136)

      P.G. Calzavara-Pinton, R. Sala, M. Arisi, M.T. Rossi, M. Venturini and B. Ortel

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12277

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Previous studies have reported that the combination of etanercept (ETN) with narrowband ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) improves the therapeutic result in patients with psoriasis who were not satisfactorily responsive to ETN alone administered at dosages of 50 mg once or twice weekly.
      • However, it is unclear if this combination is more effective than NB-UVB phototherapy alone.

      What does this study add?

      • The combination of etanercept with NB-UVB has a synergistic effect for clearing plaque-type psoriasis previously unresponsive to ETN and NB-UVB phototherapy alone.
      • The clearance rate is very high in a very short time without short-term adverse effects.
    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A randomized phase 2a efficacy and safety trial of the topical Janus kinase inhibitor tofacitinib in the treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis (pages 137–145)

      W.C. Ports, S. Khan, S. Lan, M. Lamba, C. Bolduc, R. Bissonnette and K. Papp

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12266

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Janus kinase (JAK) signalling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.
      • Tofacitinib (CP-690,550) is a novel, small-molecule JAK inhibitor in development for the treatment of several inflammatory diseases: it has demonstrated efficacy in a phase 2b study in moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis when given orally.
      • Topical therapy is the more commonly used therapeutic option for psoriasis, but there is a need for improved topical treatments.

      What does this study add?

      • In this phase 2a study, tofacitinib in an ointment formulation demonstrated efficacy, systemic safety and local tolerability during 4 weeks of treatment in patients with mild-to-moderate chronic plaque psoriasis.
      • Dermal penetration of tofacitinib, a small-molecule, was demonstrated.
      • Topical application of tofacitinib has the potential to provide an additional therapeutic option for patients with plaque psoriasis.
    9. Concise communications

      Is thyrotropin-releasing hormone a novel neuroendocrine modulator of keratin expression in human skin? (pages 146–151)

      Y. Ramot, G. Zhang, T. Bíró, L. Langbein and R. Paus

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12264

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Although keratins are one of the major structural components of the hair fibre and skin epithelium, their hormonal regulation is still relatively ill understood.
      • Because the role of neuropeptide hormones in the control of keratin expression remains largely obscure, we have followed up preliminary microarray-based evidence which had suggested that thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) may modulate keratin expression in human hair follicles.

      What does this study add?

      • The current study provides evidence that the neuropeptide hormone TRH can act as a novel neuroendocrine modulator of the expression of human hair and epithelial keratins in situ; this identifies the neuroendocrine regulation of keratin expression as an exciting new research frontier in skin biology and dermatology.
      • Together with the recently identified stimulatory activity of TRH on mitochondrial activity, hair pigmentation and hair growth in human skin, the potent keratin expression-modulating effects of TRH revealed here may serve as a basis for novel therapeutic strategies that recruit neurohormones to modulate keratin expression in human skin and its appendages.
    10. Scanning laser Doppler imaging may predict disease progression of localized scleroderma in children and young adults (pages 152–155)

      L.J. Shaw, J. Shipley, E.L. Newell, N. Harris, J.G. Clinch and C.R. Lovell

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12255

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Localized scleroderma (morphoea) in childhood can cause permanent functional disability and disfigurement.
      • Infrared thermography and single-point laser Doppler flowmetry have been investigated as tools to evaluate skin inflammation in morphoea in previous studies.

      What does this study add?

      • Our study suggests that negative laser Doppler imaging (LDI) is highly predictive of a good clinical outcome. Positive LDI not only suggests active disease but may also indicate silent disease and act as a predictive marker.
      • LDI can be used to monitor disease activity and may help to identify patients who will benefit from early intervention with systemic therapy.
    11. Mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream signalling components are activated in psoriatic skin (pages 156–159)

      C. Buerger, B. Malisiewicz, A. Eiser, K. Hardt and W.H. Boehncke

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12271

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling plays a crucial role in the control of proliferation and cell growth.
      • mTOR is abnormally regulated in skin malignancies.

      What does this study add?

      • mTOR and its downstream signalling components are activated in lesional psoriatic skin.
      • mTOR and the ribosomal protein S6 show different spatial activation patterns, suggesting different functions within the mTOR signalling cascade.
    12. Skin metastases in metastatic uveal melanoma: GNAQ/GNA11 mutational analysis as a valuable tool (pages 160–163)

      A. Tsianakas, M.R.R. Böhm, V. Getova, D. Metze, N. Eter, T. Spieker, A. Bräuninger, T. Luger, M. Schiller and C. Sunderkötter

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12291

      What's already known about this topic?

      • It remains unclear whether primary skin metastases can appear in metastatic uveal melanoma, and this is still under discussion among experts.

      What does this study add?

      • Our analysis of GNA11 mutations in skin metastases of patients with a history of uveal melanoma and no other sign of metastasis showed that the skin can be a primary site for metastasis in uveal melanoma.
      • Mutational analysis can help to clarify the origin of a metastasis and might lead to future targeted therapies.
    13. Low sensitivity of type VII collagen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in epidermolysis bullosa acquisita: serration pattern analysis on skin biopsy is required for diagnosis (pages 164–167)

      J.B. Terra, M.F. Jonkman, G.F.H. Diercks and H.H. Pas

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12300

      What's already known about this topic?

      • The type VII collagen (coll VII) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been described as a highly sensitive and specific assay for patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) who were preselected by positive indirect immunofluorescence microscopy on salt-split skin (SSS).
      • Serration pattern analysis is a nonserological alternative for making the laboratory diagnosis.

      What does this study add?

      • We determined the performance of the coll VII ELISA in SSS-positive and SSS-negative patients with EBA and found a sensitivity of 80% and 23%, respectively.
      • In all 10 cases (36%) that remained seronegative by either ELISA or SSS, confirmation of the diagnosis was still feasible by serration pattern analysis on skin biopsy.
    14. Loss-of-function mutation in AAGAB in Chinese families with punctuate palmoplantar keratoderma (pages 168–171)

      M. Li, L. Yang, H. Shi, B. Guo, X. Dai, Z. Yao and G. Zhang

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12289

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Recently, punctuate palmoplantar keratoderma (PPPK) has been reported to be caused by mutations in the genes α- and γ-adaptin-binding protein p34 (AAGAB) and collagen, type XIV, α1 (COL14A1).

      What does this study add?

      • We conducted mutation analysis of AAGAB and COL14A1 in Chinese patients with PPPK. A novel loss-of-function mutation in AAGAB was identified in two families.
      • This is the first report of a mutation in AAGAB in Chinese patients with PPPK. These findings indicate genetic heterogeneity of PPPK in China.
    15. Case reports

      Novel cutaneous effects of combination chemotherapy with BRAF and MEK inhibitors: a report of two cases (pages 172–176)

      J.S. Green, D.A. Norris and J. Wisell

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12279

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Diverse cutaneous findings have been described during treatment of metastatic melanoma with BRAF and MEK inhibitor combination chemotherapy.

      What does this study add?

      • We report for the first time the presence of sarcoidal granulomatous inflammation in two patients with metastatic melanoma during BRAF and MEK inhibitor chemotherapy.
      • In one case, inflammation occurred with multiple clinically regressing, benign-appearing naevi, which could represent an inflammatory response to degenerating naevus cells harbouring BRAF mutations.
    16. Familial multiple discoid fibromas: unique histological features and therapeutic response to topical rapamycin (pages 177–180)

      J.S. Wee, H. Chong, J. Natkunarajah, P.S. Mortimer and Y. Moosa

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12315

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Familial multiple discoid fibromas is a very rare genodermatosis characterized by discoid fibromas occurring over the face and pinnae.
      • There are some similarities with Birt–Hogg–Dubé syndrome, but without the associated mutations of the folliculin gene or systemic abnormalities.

      What does this study add?

      • We present unusual histological findings of discoid fibromas with keloidal-like collagen fibres surrounded by plump spindle and histiocyte-like cells.
      • A therapeutic response to topical rapamycin is demonstrated, suggesting that the underlying genetic defect may involve the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway.
  10. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting papers into practice
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Original articles
    9. Clinical and Laboratory Investigations
    10. Original articles
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and notices
    1. Double-blind randomized pilot trial evaluating the efficacy of oral propranolol on infantile haemangiomas in infants < 4 months of age (pages 181–183)

      C. Léauté-Labrèze, E. Dumas de la Roque, F. Nacka, A. Abouelfath, N. Grenier, M. Rebola, K. Ezzedine and N. Moore

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12217

    2. Humoral and cell-mediated autoimmunity in lichen sclerosus (pages 183–184)

      T. Gambichler, D. Belz, S. Terras and A. Kreuter

      Article first published online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12220

    3. Alemtuzumab and chronic plaque psoriasis (pages 184–186)

      A. Aslam, A.M. Marsland, D. Rog and C.E.M. Griffiths

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12226

    4. Multiple cutaneous infantile haemangiomas and the risk of internal haemangioma (pages 188–191)

      A.D. Vredenborg, S.R. Janmohamed, P.C.J. de Laat, G.C. Madern and A.P. Oranje

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12229

    5. Bullous pemphigoid in an infant with milk protein allergy (pages 191–192)

      E. Cinotti, C. Douchet, J.L. Perrot, B. Labeille, C. Allombert-Blaise and F. Cambazard

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12228

    6. A case of junctional epidermolysis bullosa with prurigo-like lesions and reduction of collagen XVII and filaggrin (pages 195–198)

      L. Cifuentes, D. Kiritsi, W. Chen, J. Pennino, J. Ring, S. Weidinger and C. Has

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12241

    7. Refractory cutaneous angiosarcoma successfully treated with sunitinib (pages 204–206)

      H.-J. Lu, P.C.-H. Chen, C.-C. Yen, F.-C. Hsiao, C.-H. Tzeng, H. Ma, C.-Y. Shiau and T.-C. Chao

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12258

    8. Sarcoidosis associated with vemurafenib (pages 206–208)

      A. Adam, L. Thomas, N. Bories, D. Zaharia, B. Balme, N. Freymond and S. Dalle

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12268

    9. Use of cetuximab as an adjuvant agent to radiotherapy and surgery in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa with squamous cell carcinoma (pages 208–210)

      M. Kim, M. Li, L.R.A. Intong, K. Tran, W. Melbourne, D. Marucci, J. Bucci, P. de Souza, G. Mallesara and D.F. Murrell

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12272

    10. Linear immunoglobulin-A bullous dermatosis complicating multi-organ tuberculosis at early-stage treatment (pages 210–211)

      C. Morice, G. Monsel, M. Lafaurie, M. Battistella, J.R. Manciet, M. Bagot, A. Petit and M. Viguier

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12286

    11. Keratins of the human occipital hair medulla: androgenic regulation of in vitro hair keratin K37 expression (pages 218–221)

      H. Yoshida, H. Taguchi, T. Kitahara, Y. Takema, M.O. Visscher, J. Schweizer and L. Langbein

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12278

    12. Blood MUC-18/MCAM expression in patients with melanoma: a suitable marker of poor outcome (pages 221–222)

      M.C. Rapanotti, I. Ricozzi, E. Campione, A. Orlandi and L. Bianchi

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12295

    13. No genetic support for a contribution of prostaglandins to the aetiology of androgenetic alopecia (pages 222–224)

      S. Heilmann, D.R. Nyholt, F.F. Brockschmidt, A.M. Hillmer, C. Herold, The Maan consortium, T. Becker, N.G. Martin, M.M. Nöthen and The Meta-Analysis for Androgenetic Alopecia Novel Determinants (MAAN) consortium

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12292

    14. Eyebrow alopecia: centrofacial trichoblastomatosis (pages 224–226)

      M. Galán-Gutierrez, R. Ruiz-Villaverde, D. Sánchez-Cano and A. Sánz-Trelles

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12294

    15. Digital necrosis from dandelion tea (pages 227–230)

      B. Moriarty, J.H. Pinney, M.P. Owen-Casey, M.H.A. Rustin, F. Deroide, C. Laing and A. Davenport

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12288

    16. Liraglutide in combination with acitretin for severe recalcitrant psoriasis (pages 230–231)

      C.T. Reid, A.M. Tobin, T. Ahern, D. O'Shea and B. Kirby

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12380

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