British Journal of Dermatology

Cover image for Vol. 169 Issue 5

November 2013

Volume 169, Issue 5

Pages i–i, 961–1172

  1. Editor's Choice

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Corrigendum
    10. Erratum
    11. News and Notices
    1. You have free access to this content
      Editor's Choice (page i)

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12656

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Corrigendum
    10. Erratum
    11. News and Notices
  3. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Corrigendum
    10. Erratum
    11. News and Notices
  4. Review articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Corrigendum
    10. Erratum
    11. News and Notices
    1. Does psychosocial stress play a role in the exacerbation of psoriasis? (pages 965–974)

      H.J.A. Hunter, C.E.M. Griffiths and C.E. Kleyn

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12478

      What's already known about this topic?

      • There is a temporal relationship between psychosocial stress and the exacerbation of psoriasis.
      • The mechanism by which psychosocial stress causes such an effect is largely unknown.
      • Addressing both the psychosocial and physical aspects of psoriasis improves patient outcome.

      What does this study add?

      • A summary of the historical studies that support a temporal relationship between psychosocial stress and the exacerbation of psoriasis.
      • A review of the pathophysiological mechanisms by which psychosocial stress may exacerbate psoriasis.
      • A rationale for considering the psychosocial aspects of psoriasis when constructing a patient management plan.
    2. The important role of radiation treatment in the management of Merkel cell carcinoma (pages 975–982)

      G. Hruby, R.A. Scolyer and J.F. Thompson

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12481

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Most studies of Merkel cell carcinoma are retrospective, contain heterogeneous patient populations treated according to clinician preference, and often over an extended period.

      What does this study add?

      • This review updates the existing literature, including analysis of the only randomized trial in this disease, as well as the sequential prospective trials performed by the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group investigators.
      • The review indicates the importance of integrating radiation treatment, with or without chemotherapy, with surgery in the multidisciplinary management of this rare disease.
  5. Systematic review

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Corrigendum
    10. Erratum
    11. News and Notices
    1. Does early life exposure to antibiotics increase the risk of eczema? A systematic review (pages 983–991)

      T. Tsakok, T.M. McKeever, L. Yeo and C. Flohr

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12476

      What's already known about this topic?

      • A number of studies have suggested that early life exposure to antibiotics may lead to an increased risk of subsequent eczema.

      • The evidence to date is conflicting and no systematic review has been conducted.

      What does this study add?

      • Antibiotic exposure in early life may increase the risk of subsequent eczema by up to 40%, with broad-spectrum antibiotics having a more pronounced effect.
      • Each additional antibiotic course may confer a further 7% risk increase.
      • Antibiotics should be prescribed with caution, especially in high-risk children.
  6. Original articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Corrigendum
    10. Erratum
    11. News and Notices
    1. Clinical and laboratory investigations

      Effect of tofacitinib, a Janus kinase inhibitor, on haematological parameters during 12 weeks of psoriasis treatment (pages 992–999)

      B. Strober, M. Buonanno, J.D. Clark, T. Kawabata, H. Tan, R. Wolk, H. Valdez, R.G. Langley, J. Harness, A. Menter and K. Papp

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12517

      What's already known about this topic?

      • The Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor tofacitinib has demonstrated efficacy for the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis in a phase IIb trial.
      • JAK-dependent signalling is integral to haematopoiesis. Thus, the haematological effects of tofacitinib require evaluation.

      What does this study add?

      • Over 12 weeks, tofacitinib conferred dose-dependent, tolerable changes in selected haematological parameters.
      • Effects on red blood cells and haemoglobin appeared nonprogressive; effects on reticulocytes may reflect dynamic, compensatory changes in erythropoiesis.
      • Effects on neutrophils and lymphocytes appeared transient; eosinophils returned to near baseline levels 4 weeks after treatment cessation.
      • Likely mechanisms may involve partial inhibition of haematopoietic cytokine signalling via JAKs. Longer-term evaluation is warranted.
    2. The development and validation of the Treatment of Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life questionnaire, a tool to measure the quality of life impacts of treatments used in patients with autoimmune blistering disease (pages 1000–1006)

      A. Tjokrowidjaja, B.S. Daniel, J.W. Frew, D.F. Sebaratnam, A.M. Hanna, S. Chee, A. Dermawan, C.Q. Wang, C. Lim, S.S. Venugopal, L.M. Rhodes, B. Welsh, T. Nijsten and D.F. Murrell

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12623

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Treatments for autoimmune bullous disease (AIBD) have a significant risk of medical complications and quality of life impacts during treatment.
      • It is difficult to differentiate quality of life impacts from disease burden or the effects of treatment.

      What does this study add?

      • The Treatment of Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life questionnaire allows quantitative measurement of treatment-based quality of life impacts in AIBDs.
      • Longitudinal measurements allow consideration of optimal balance between disease control and treatment burden.
      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Erratum

      Vol. 170, Issue 2, 481–483, Article first published online: 18 FEB 2014

    3. You have free access to this content
      Brachioradial pruritus: Mayo Clinic experience over the past decade (pages 1007–1015)

      S.A. Mirzoyev and M.D.P. Davis

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12483

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Brachioradial pruritus (BRP) is a fascinating condition that is seen increasingly often.
      • Additional data from retrospective observational studies could enhance our understanding of the disease.

      What does this study add?

      • This study reports data on a large number of patients with BRP.
      • We add to the limited knowledge of BRP, and we hope that the experience at our institution will provide guidance in diagnosing and managing this medical condition.
    4. You have free access to this content
      Laboratory diagnosis of paraneoplastic pemphigus (pages 1016–1024)

      A.M. Poot, G.F.H. Diercks, D. Kramer, I. Schepens, G. Klunder, T. Hashimoto, L. Borradori, M.F. Jonkman and H.H. Pas

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12479

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP) is a severe autoimmune disease characterized by anti plakin and anti-α2 macroglobulin-like 1 (A2ML1) autoantibodies.
      • Its laboratory diagnosis is based on demonstrating the presence of these autoantibodies in serum.

      What does this study add?

      • This study shows the diagnostic value of an array of laboratory techniques for PNP.
      • We confirm that immunoprecipitation studies are the most sensitive, partly because of the detection of anti-A2ML1 antibodies.
      • Rat bladder indirect immunofluorescence in combination with immunoblotting provides an easier and accurate alternative to immunoprecipitation.
      • Envoplakin ELISA is of lower sensitivity.
    5. You have free access to this content
      Fibroblast cell therapy enhances initial healing in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa wounds: results of a randomized, vehicle-controlled trial (pages 1025–1033)

      G. Petrof, M. Martinez-Queipo, J.E. Mellerio, P. Kemp and J.A. McGrath

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12599

      What's already known about this topic?

      • There is a desperate need to develop new therapies for patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB).
      • Cultured fibroblasts represent a form of cell therapy that might have clinical utility in RDEB.
      • Injecting allogeneic fibroblasts into RDEB skin has been shown to modify disease biology but whether this procedure has a beneficial impact on wound healing is not yet known.

      What does this study add?

      • We assessed the effects of injecting of allogeneic fibroblasts into the margins of chronic erosions in individuals with RDEB in a prospective, double-blind, randomized, vehicle-controlled phase II trial.
      • A single intradermal injection of allogeneic fibroblasts increases the initial rate of erosion healing in subjects with RDEB within the first 28 days but not thereafter.
      • Further studies are needed to address the potential benefits of retreatment as well as optimal cell delivery.
    6. You have free access to this content
      Incorporating clinical metadata with digital image features for automated identification of cutaneous melanoma (pages 1034–1040)

      Z. Liu, J. Sun, M. Smith, L. Smith and R. Warr

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12550

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) of melanoma has been advocated to improve clinical diagnostic accuracy.
      • Existing CAD systems can only partially simulate the procedure adopted by dermatologists in making a diagnosis.

      What does this study add?

      • In addition to information on the individual lesion itself, patient metadata are, for the first time, incorporated to form a new CAD system for melanoma diagnosis.
      • The integration of clinical metadata helps to improve the performance of automatic identification of melanoma.
    7. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis: comparison between the drug-induced and spontaneous forms (pages 1041–1048)

      J. Chanal, S. Ingen-Housz-Oro, N. Ortonne, T.-A. Duong, M. Thomas, L. Valeyrie-Allanore, B. Lebrun-Vignes, C. André, J.-C. Roujeau, O. Chosidow and P. Wolkenstein

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12488

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD) is a rare autoimmune dermatosis usually considered spontaneous or drug induced.
      • Clinical features are polymorphic, and pseudotoxic epidermal necrolysis forms have been described.
      • To date, spontaneous and drug-induced LABD have not been compared.

      What does this study add?

      • Drug-induced LABD, often with Nikolsky sign and large erosions, is more severe than the spontaneous form.
    8. You have free access to this content
      The clinical significance of BRAF and NRAS mutations in a clinic-based metastatic melanoma cohort (pages 1049–1055)

      H. Ekedahl, H. Cirenajwis, K. Harbst, A. Carneiro, K. Nielsen, H. Olsson, L. Lundgren, C. Ingvar and G. Jönsson

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12504

      What's already known about this topic?

      • BRAF and NRAS mutations occur frequently in melanoma tumours.
      • BRAF and NRAS mutations are associated with certain clinical and histopathological characteristics.
      • Treatment with BRAF inhibitors improves survival in generalized melanoma.

      What does this study add?

      • There is high consistency in BRAF and NRAS mutation status between paired metastases.
      • We show differences in clinical outcome in relation to BRAF and NRAS status in patients with distant metastatic disease.
      • We confirm the effect of a BRAF inhibitor in a single clinical institution.
    9. Knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in everyday life with chronic hand eczema: a qualitative study (pages 1056–1065)

      A. Mollerup, J.D. Johansen and L.F. Thing

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12524

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Chronic hand eczema requires self-initiated topical treatment and continuous preventive behaviour.
      • Medication adherence to dermatological treatment is considered low.

      What does this study add?

      • Everyday life with hand eczema is complex, but patients perceive that they are offered only simple solutions.
      • The barriers to preventive behaviour involve treatment-related discomfort and social considerations.
      • Self-management support must focus on people's knowledge, attitudes and behaviour with the aim of integrating preventive behaviour through habits.
    10. Elevated serum levels of endocan in patients with psoriasis vulgaris: correlations with cardiovascular risk and activity of disease (pages 1066–1070)

      I. Balta, S. Balta, S. Demirkol, D.P. Mikhailidis, T. Celik, M. Akhan, O. Kurt, Y.G. Kurt, I. Aydin and S. Kilic

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12525

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Psoriasis is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.
      • Endothelial dysfunction is regarded as being the initial process in the development of atherosclerosis.
      • Endocan is a novel human endothelial cell-specific molecule. Previous studies suggested that endocan may be a surrogate endothelial dysfunction marker.

      What does this study add?

      • Our findings suggest that circulating endocan may be a new marker of severity of psoriasis vulgaris and cardiovascular risk in patients with the disease.
    11. Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS): an original multisystem adverse drug reaction. Results from the prospective RegiSCAR study (pages 1071–1080)

      S.H. Kardaun, P. Sekula, L. Valeyrie-Allanore, Y. Liss, C.Y. Chu, D. Creamer, A. Sidoroff, L. Naldi, M. Mockenhaupt, J.C. Roujeau and for the RegiSCAR study group

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12501

      What's already known about this topic?

      • DRESS is a hypersensitivity reaction, characterized by a variable combination of symptomatic and asymptomatic features.

      What does this study add?

      • DRESS is an original phenotype among severe cutaneous adverse reactions in terms of clinical and biological characteristics, drugs, time relation, and course.
      • Besides eosinophilia, other haematological abnormalities are frequent.
      • The diversity of causative drugs is rather limited.
      • The prodromal period is quite variable, introducing risk of protopathic bias, especially for antibiotics and NSAIDs.
    12. Increased epicardial fat tissue is a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with psoriasis (pages 1081–1086)

      B. Bulbul Sen, N. Atci, E.N. Rifaioglu, O. Ekiz, I. Kartal, E. Buyukkaya, M. Kurt, M.F. Karakas, S. Buyukkaya, A.B. Akcay and N. Sen

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12569

      What's already known about this topic?

      • The risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and cardiovascular mortality increases in patients with psoriasis.
      • Carotid intima–media thickness (CIMT) is a potential indicator of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with psoriasis. Epicardial fat thickness (EFT) is proposed as a new cardiometabolic risk factor.

      What does this study add?

      • EFT and CIMT are increased in patients with psoriasis compared with healthy controls.
      • Echocardiographic EFT is closely correlated with CIMT in patients with psoriasis.
      • The echocardiographic assessment of EFT may have the potential to be a simple marker of subclinical atherosclerosis and increased cardiovascular risk in patients with psoriasis.
    13. Dermatological surgery and lasers

      You have free access to this content
      Intensified fractional CO2 laser-assisted photodynamic therapy vs. laser alone for organ transplant recipients with multiple actinic keratoses and wart-like lesions: a randomized half-side comparative trial on dorsal hands (pages 1087–1092)

      P. Helsing, K. Togsverd-Bo, M.B. Veierød, G. Mørk and M. Hædersdal

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12507

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is effective for actinic keratosis (AK), but inferior outcomes are obtained in organ transplant recipients (OTRs) and in the treatment of acral locations.
      • Laser ablation clears AK, facilitates uptake of the photosensitizing drug and intensifies PDT when used in combination.

      What does this study add?

      • Ablative fractional laser (AFXL)-assisted PDT is more effective than AFXL alone in the treatment of acral AKs in OTRs.
    14. Epidemiology and health services research

      Regional variations of basal cell carcinoma incidence in the U.K. using The Health Improvement Network database (2004–10) (pages 1093–1099)

      A. Musah, J.E. Gibson, J. Leonardi-Bee, M.R. Cave, E.L. Ander and F. Bath-Hextall

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12446

      What's already known about this topic?

      • The incidence rate of basal cell carcinoma in the U.K. is high compared with other types of nonmelanoma skin cancers.
      • Risk factors include exposure to ultraviolet radiation through sunlight or tanning beds, and age and ethnicity.
      • Incidence in the younger population is rising, although incidence increases after 40 years of age.

      What does this study add?

      • These findings provide novel estimates for regional incidence rates across the U.K.
      • They also provide novel estimates for levels of socioeconomic deprivation in the U.K.
    15. Epidemiology of basal cell carcinoma in Lithuania, 1996–2010 (pages 1100–1105)

      R. Jurciukonyte, I. Vincerzevskiene, A. Krilaviciute, M. Bylaite and G. Smailyte

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12485

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer among the white population.
      • Incidence data on BCC are sparse because the traditional cancer registries often do not register BCC.
      • Incidence of BCC is quite well described in Northern and Western Europe, but there is little information about the distribution of BCC in other parts of Europe.

      What does this study add?

      • This study provides some insights into the epidemiology of BCC in Lithuania.
    16. Prognostic factors associated with healing of venous leg ulcers: a multicentre, prospective, cohort study (pages 1106–1113)

      G. Chaby, P. Senet, O. Ganry, A. Caudron, D. Thuillier, C. Debure, S. Meaume, F. Truchetet, P. Combemale, F. Skowron, P. Joly, C. Lok and for the Angio-Dermatology Group of the French Society of Dermatology

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12570

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Despite advances in venous leg ulcer (VLU) management, the time to ulcer healing generally remains long.
      • Some prognostic markers of healing have been evaluated, mostly in retrospective studies.

      What does this study add?

      • In this prospective, multicentre, cohort study, complete healing of long-standing, large VLUs at 6 months was independently associated with ablation of the incompetent superficial vein and percentage of wound area reduction after the first 4 weeks of treatment.
    17. Genetics

      You have free access to this content
      Association of NLRP1 genetic variants and mRNA overexpression with generalized vitiligo and disease activity in a Gujarat population (pages 1114–1125)

      M. Dwivedi, N.C. Laddha, M.S. Mansuri, Y.S. Marfatia and R. Begum

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12467

      What's already known about this topic?

      • It has been suggested that melanocyte death is mediated by apoptosis in the context of autoimmunity. NLRP1 is involved in inflammation and apoptosis, thereby indicating a role in the susceptibility to a wide range of autoimmune diseases including generalized vitiligo (GV).
      • Genetic variants in NLRP1 have previously been shown to be associated with GV.

      What does this study add?

      • The present study for the first time reports that NLRP1 rs2670660 and rs6502867 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with increased NLRP1 mRNA expression.
      • The study also reveals differences in association of NLRP1 allelic variants with GV in a Gujarat population compared with white populations. GV is associated with the opposite allele at SNP rs6502867 in the Gujarat population compared with white populations, and has only marginal association with another SNP (rs12150220), which is associated with GV in white subjects.
    18. Therapeutics

      Long-term outcome of intravenous therapy with rituximab in patients with primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas (pages 1126–1132)

      A. Brandenburg, D. Humme, D. Terhorst, S. Gellrich, W. Sterry and M. Beyer

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12484

      What is already known about this topic?

      • Treatment with rituximab induces remissions in primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas.

      What does this study add?

      • The long-term follow-up demonstrates that the majority of patients relapse after rituximab treatment with a median duration of response of 25 months.
      • Use of rituximab appears to be safe as all relapses involved the skin only and late occurring adverse events were not observed.
    19. Interferon-γ release assay for tuberculosis in patients with psoriasis treated with tumour necrosis factor antagonists: in vivo and in vitro analysis (pages 1133–1140)

      I. Sauzullo, F. Mengoni, R. Marocco, C. Potenza, N. Skroza, T. Tieghi, M. Lichtner, V. Vullo and C.M. Mastroianni

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12544

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is mandatory in patients with psoriasis prior to starting on tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers.

      What does this study add?

      • This paper evaluated the longitudinal changes of IFN-γ response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigens by serial QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube testing in patients with psoriasis during in vivo and in vitro treatment with biological anti-TNF therapy.
    20. Adalimumab for the treatment of psoriasis in real life: a retrospective cohort of 119 patients at a single Spanish centre (pages 1141–1147)

      A. López-Ferrer, E. Vilarrasa, I.J. Gich and L. Puig

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12543

      What's already known about this topic?

      • There are few reports on the use of adalimumab for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis in clinical practice according to the European Medicines Agency.
      • Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) 75% response rates at 16 weeks and 6 months were approximately 60% in a previously published U.K. series.
      • Male sex and the presence of arthritis have been associated with decreased drug survival in one study.

      What does this study add?

      • Biologic-naive status and efficacy parameters denoting a good or excellent response appear to be associated with a higher probability of drug survival.
      • Combination treatment increased PASI response rates at 6 months and might provide an explanation for the relatively high rate of PASI 90 responders in our cohort.
      • Infections, including de novo infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, accounted for most serious adverse events, and paradoxical flares of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis were relatively frequent.
    21. Concise communications

      Paediatric pseudoxanthoma elasticum with cardiovascular involvement (pages 1148–1151)

      Q. Li, J. Baker, J. Kowalczyk, Q. Jiang, J. Uitto and L. Schachner

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12462

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), an aberrant mineralization disease, characteristically has a late-onset of manifestations primarily with skin findings.
      • Generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) is characterized by extensive arterial calcification noted by prenatal ultrasound or at birth.
      • While PXE and GACI in their classic forms are associated with mutations in the ABCC6 and ENPP1 genes, recently both genotypic and phenotypic overlap has been noted.

      What does this study add?

      • A patient was noted to have skin findings characteristic of PXE as early as at 6 years of age, associated with cardiovascular mineralization.
      • Sequence analysis revealed compound heterozygosity for two mutations, g.del23–29 and p.R1141X, in the ABCC6 gene.
      • This case illustrates the phenotypic spectrum of PXE, with early manifestations in the paediatric population with cardiovascular mineralization, with overlapping clinical features with GACI.
    22. Analysis of distribution patterns of Propionibacterium acnes phylotypes and Peptostreptococcus species from acne lesions (pages 1152–1155)

      H.H. Kwon, J.Y. Yoon, S.Y. Park and D.H. Suh

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12486

      What's already known about this topic?

      • The precise roles of Propionibacterium acnes and other anaerobic bacteria in the pathogenesis of acne are still unclear.
      • Recent studies have shown that P. acnes can be classified into several phylotypes with distinct phenotypes and virulence; their distribution patterns in acne samples have rarely been demonstrated.
      • It is suspected that anaerobic organisms other than P. acnes also have a role in the pathogenesis of acne.

      What does this study add?

      • There was no significant difference in the microflora of the skin surface samples from the acne and non-acne groups.
      • Type IA P. acnes and Peptostreptococcus species were found in higher proportions in papules and pustules compared with comedones and the skin surface, suggesting their possible association with inflammatory lesions.
      • Consideration of P. acnes phylotypes or other anaerobic bacteria might add valuable insights for the elucidation of bacterial roles in acne pathogenesis.
  7. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Corrigendum
    10. Erratum
    11. News and Notices
    1. Lymphomatoid papulosis type D: an aggressive histology for an indolent disease (pages 1157–1159)

      A. Bertolotti, A.-L. Pham-Ledard, B. Vergier, M. Parrens, C. Bedane and M. Beylot-Barry

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12463

    2. Filaggrin gene mutations and risk of basal cell carcinoma (pages 1162–1164)

      J. Kaae, J.P. Thyssen, J.D. Johansen, M. Meldgaard, A. Linneberg, M. Allen and L. Skov

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12573

    3. The impact of ozone depletion on skin cancer incidence in Korea (pages 1164–1165)

      S.G. Lee, N.Y. Ko, S.W. Son, H.J. Bae, J.S. Ha, H.Y. Pak and Y.S. Shin

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12472

    4. Systemic mastocytosis associated with cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (pages 1165–1167)

      K.M. Meyer, M. Landthaler, C. Hafner and E. Geissinger

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12471

    5. Concerns regarding BRAF testing algorithm (pages 1167–1168)

      R.R. Clark, J.J. Garioch and M.D.S. Moncrieff

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12508

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum

      Vol. 170, Issue 6, 1382, Article first published online: 19 JUN 2014

    6. Concerns regarding BRAF testing algorithm: reply from authors (pages 1168–1170)

      D. Gonzalez, L. Fearfield, P. Nathan, P. Tanière, A. Wallace, E. Brown, C. Harwood, J. Marsden and S. Whittaker

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12509

  8. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Corrigendum
    10. Erratum
    11. News and Notices
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum (page 1171)

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12619

      This article corrects:

      Ichthyosis, photosensitivity and pseudoerythrodontia

      Vol. 159, Issue 4, 979–981, Article first published online: 21 JUL 2008

  9. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Corrigendum
    10. Erratum
    11. News and Notices
    1. You have free access to this content
      Erratum (page 1171)

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12703

      This article corrects:

      The European treatment of severe atopic eczema in children taskforce (TREAT) survey

      Vol. 169, Issue 4, 901–909, Article first published online: 10 OCT 2013

  10. News and Notices

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Original articles
    8. Correspondence
    9. Corrigendum
    10. Erratum
    11. News and Notices

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