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British Journal of Dermatology

Cover image for Vol. 169 Issue s3

Special Issue: Ethnic Skin: a New Era for Studying Human Cutaneous Diversity

October 2013

Volume 169, Issue Supplement s3

Pages iii–v, 1–97

  1. Ethnic Skin: a New Era for Studying Human Cutaneous Diversity. This supplement was kindly sponsored by L'Oréal Research & Innovation and Beiersdorf

    1. Top of page
    2. Ethnic Skin: a New Era for Studying Human Cutaneous Diversity. This supplement was kindly sponsored by L'Oréal Research & Innovation and Beiersdorf
    3. Commentary
    4. Review articles
    1. Editorial

      You have free access to this content
  2. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Ethnic Skin: a New Era for Studying Human Cutaneous Diversity. This supplement was kindly sponsored by L'Oréal Research & Innovation and Beiersdorf
    3. Commentary
    4. Review articles
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. Review articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Ethnic Skin: a New Era for Studying Human Cutaneous Diversity. This supplement was kindly sponsored by L'Oréal Research & Innovation and Beiersdorf
    3. Commentary
    4. Review articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Multisystemic diseases and ethnicity: a focus on lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, sarcoidosis and Behçet disease (pages 1–10)

      A. Petit and O.E. Dadzie

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12533

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      What's already known about the subject?

      • A multisystemic disease is a disorder in which several organs or systems are affected by the same pathological process.
      • Clinical experience supports an association between ethnicity and the clinical and epidemiological aspects of some multisystemic diseases.

      What does this study add?

      • This study presents an evidence-based review of the impact of ethnicity on epidemiological and cutaneous features of four multisystemic diseases: lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, sarcoidosis and Behçet disease.
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      The impact of human immunodeficiency virus-related diseases on pigmented skin types (pages 11–18)

      M. Ameen

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12527

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a significant problem globally.
      • HIV infection is associated with a wide range of skin disorders.
      • Clinical presentation varies in pigmented skin types.

      What does this study add?

      • An overview of the common HIV-related skin diseases with emphasis on differences in darker skin types.
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      Hair and scalp disorders in women of African descent: an overview (pages 19–32)

      A. Salam, S. Aryiku and O.E. Dadzie

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12534

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Hair and scalp disorders are a significant problem in women of African descent.

      What does this study add?

      • An overview of the biological characteristics of afro-textured hair.
      • An overview of the hair-grooming practices of women of African descent.
      • A practical approach to diagnosing and managing common hair and scalp disorders in women of African descent.
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      Variations in skin colour and the biological consequences of ultraviolet radiation exposure (pages 33–40)

      S. Del Bino and F. Bernerd

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12529

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Sun exposure sensitivity is largely dependent on the degree of skin constitutive pigmentation.

      What does this study add?

      • The individual typology angle (ITA)-based skin colour classification correlates with constitutive pigmentation and is physiologically relevant in different geographical areas.
      • It may help identify differential responses to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure that correspond to particular skin colour type's UVR sensitivities.
      • It supports the concept of personalized photoprotection.
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      Facial hyperpigmentation: causes and treatment (pages 41–56)

      N.A. Vashi and R.V. Kundu

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12536

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • In the skin of colour population, facial hyperpigmentation is a common and growing concern when presenting to the physician.
      • Facial hyperpigmentation can cause significant cosmetic disfigurement with subsequent emotional impact. Therapy continues to be challenging as there is no universally effective treatment. Existing agents have varying degrees of efficacy and potential risk of postinflammatory hyperpigmentation with different treatment protocols.

      What does this study add?

      • Persons of colour will soon comprise a majority of the international and domestic populations.
      • A comprehensive knowledge and approach to assessment and treatment is necessary to care properly for skin of colour patients.
      • This review thoroughly discusses aetiologies of facial hyperpigmentation and categorizes appropriate treatment strategies.
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      Surgical interventions for vitiligo: an evidence-based review (pages 57–66)

      S.V. Mulekar and P. Isedeh

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12532

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Surgical interventions are indicated in the setting of stable vitiligo, unresponsive to conventional therapies.
      • Surgical interventions includes tissue and cellular grafting techniques.

      What does this study add?

      • This is an evidence-based review comparing the various surgical interventions for vitiligo.
      • It underscores the need for more randomized clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of surgical interventions for vitiligo.
      • It highlights the need for global standardization in the assessment of repigmentation using objective rather than subjective criteria.
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      Future horizons in vitiligo research: focusing on the recommendations of the Cochrane systematic review ‘Interventions for vitiligo’ 2010 (pages 67–70)

      V. Eleftheriadou

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12530

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Healthcare decisions should be evidence based, e.g. based on data published in a Cochrane review.
      • The recently updated Cochrane systematic review, ‘Interventions for vitiligo’ 2010, highlighted several outstanding issues pertaining to vitiligo research.

      What does this study add?

      • This article provides an overview of progress made thus far to address the issues highlighted by the updated Cochrane systematic review in 2010, ‘Interventions for vitiligo’. The implications for research, as well as clinical practice are discussed.
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      Strategic management of keloid disease in ethnic skin: a structured approach supported by the emerging literature (pages 71–81)

      S. Ud-Din and A. Bayat

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12588

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Keloid disease (KD) is a common, benign, fibroproliferative tumour of unknown origin.
      • With high recurrence rates, treatment of KD remains a challenge for both the patient and clinician.
      • With lack of level-one evidence, there is no single advocated therapy.

      What does this study add?

      • A structured strategic approach for management of KD by utilizing a focused history, targeted therapy and regular follow-up of the patient.
      • Patients' symptoms, signs, quality of life and psychosocial well-being should be carefully evaluated and managed.
      • The role of emerging adjuvant treatments such as electrical stimulation and photodynamic therapy is highlighted.
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      Chemical peeling in ethnic skin: an update (pages 82–90)

      A. Salam, O.E. Dadzie and H. Galadari

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12535

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Chemical peels are efficacious therapeutic interventions for many skin disorders.
      • Many peels exist; however, not all are safe for use in ethnic skin.
      • Darker skin types have an increased risk of adverse events from chemical peeling such as pigmentary disorders.

      What does this study add?

      • This is an up-to-date review of the various peeling agents and their indications for use in ethnic skin.
      • It provides a summary of newer peeling agents.
      • It gives practical tips on performing chemical peeling safely and effectively in ethnic skin.
      • Prevention and management of complications of chemical peeling in this cohort are discussed.
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      Lasers and light-based therapies in ethnic skin: treatment options and recommendations for Fitzpatrick skin types V and VI (pages 91–97)

      A.F. Alexis

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12526

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Published data or recommendations on the safe and effective use of lasers in Fitzpatrick skin phototypes (SPT) V and VI are limited.

      What does this study add?

      • This review addresses knowledge and practice gaps by summarizing available data on the use of lasers in patients with SPT V and VI, a subset of the population in which the risk of iatrogenic pigmentary and scarring complications is highest.
      • This provides clinicians with practical knowledge of which devices have been studied in SPT V and VI and offers treatment recommendations to improve outcomes.

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