British Journal of Dermatology

Cover image for Vol. 170 Issue 1

January 2014

Volume 170, Issue 1

Pages i–i, 1–227, e1–e15

  1. Editor's Choice

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorials
    4. Commentaries
    5. Guest Editorial
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Systematic review
    9. Cutaneous biology
    10. Original articles
    11. Case report
    12. Correspondence
    13. Book Review
    14. Erratum
    15. News and Notices
    16. Plain Language Summaries
    17. Abstracts
  2. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorials
    4. Commentaries
    5. Guest Editorial
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Systematic review
    9. Cutaneous biology
    10. Original articles
    11. Case report
    12. Correspondence
    13. Book Review
    14. Erratum
    15. News and Notices
    16. Plain Language Summaries
    17. Abstracts
  3. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorials
    4. Commentaries
    5. Guest Editorial
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Systematic review
    9. Cutaneous biology
    10. Original articles
    11. Case report
    12. Correspondence
    13. Book Review
    14. Erratum
    15. News and Notices
    16. Plain Language Summaries
    17. Abstracts
    1. Skin cancer: more than skin deep? (page 8)

      J.K. Rivers

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12751

      ORIGINAL ARTICLE, p 136

  4. Guest Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorials
    4. Commentaries
    5. Guest Editorial
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Systematic review
    9. Cutaneous biology
    10. Original articles
    11. Case report
    12. Correspondence
    13. Book Review
    14. Erratum
    15. News and Notices
    16. Plain Language Summaries
    17. Abstracts
  5. Scholarly reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorials
    4. Commentaries
    5. Guest Editorial
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Systematic review
    9. Cutaneous biology
    10. Original articles
    11. Case report
    12. Correspondence
    13. Book Review
    14. Erratum
    15. News and Notices
    16. Plain Language Summaries
    17. Abstracts
    1. You have free access to this content
      Emerging trends in the epidemiology of melanoma (pages 11–19)

      V. Nikolaou and A.J. Stratigos

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12492

      What's already known about this topic?

      • The mains trends of current melanoma epidemiology consist of an increasing incidence, stable mortality and persistence of thick tumours with disproportional burden on men aged > 60 years.
      • Excess ultraviolet radiation exposure interacting with genetically determined phenotypic characteristics through different oncogenetic pathways is the major predisposing factor for melanoma development.

      What does this study add?

      • The review discusses the trends of melanoma incidence and mortality and reviews the current data on established and potentially novel risk factors and disease associations.
  6. Review articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorials
    4. Commentaries
    5. Guest Editorial
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Systematic review
    9. Cutaneous biology
    10. Original articles
    11. Case report
    12. Correspondence
    13. Book Review
    14. Erratum
    15. News and Notices
    16. Plain Language Summaries
    17. Abstracts
    1. The hapten–atopy hypothesis III: the potential role of airborne chemicals (pages 45–51)

      J.P. McFadden, D.A. Basketter, R.J. Dearman, P. Puangpet and I. Kimber

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12602

      What's already known about this topic?

      • There has been a 300–500% increase in atopic diseases observed over the last 50 years in Western Europe and other ‘urbanized’ countries.
      • This has coincided with an increased exposure to various common chemicals in the personal environment.

      What does this study add?

      • We review evidence for the potential role of airborne chemical exposure, in addition to oral and cutaneous chemical exposure, in contributing to the increased prevalence of atopic disease.
    2. You have free access to this content
      Radiotherapy for lentigo maligna: a literature review and recommendations for treatment (pages 52–58)

      G.B. Fogarty, A. Hong, R.A. Scolyer, E. Lin, L. Haydu, P. Guitera and J. Thompson

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12611

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Radiotherapy is increasingly used for the treatment of lentigo maligna; however, there is a lack of evidence-based radiotherapy treatment guidelines.

      What does this study add?

      • This is the first literature review of radiotherapy for lentigo maligna.
      • We have developed recommendations for radiotherapy of lentigo maligna based on the review and our own initial experience from a multidisciplinary lentigo maligna clinic.
    3. Bimodal immune activation in psoriasis (pages 59–65)

      E. Christophers, G. Metzler and M. Röcken

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12631

      What's already known about this topic?

      • The understanding of psoriasis has greatly advanced over the past 20 years. It started by recognizing psoriasis as a T-cell-mediated disease caused by interferon-producing T cells.
      • Important roles for interleukin (IL)-1-related molecules have been uncovered, and partially underlined by clinical studies.
      • Because of the importance of different mediators such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-1, and T helper (Th)1 and Th17 immunity, psoriasis is increasingly viewed as a plethora of different diseases.

      What does this study add?

      • Joining insights from genetics and immunology with clinical and histological pictures of single psoriasis lesions, here we suggest that psoriasis is one disease complex that appears at different levels.
      • Psoriasis starts as an IL-1–TNF-mediated, neutrophil-dominated inflammation that initiates a Th17/Th22-dominated early T-cell infiltrate that turns into a Th1-dominated psoriasis plaque.
      • Such plaques are sustained periodically by IL-1–TNF-producing squirting papillae that steadily deliver new psoriasis foci inside the lesion.
  7. Systematic review

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorials
    4. Commentaries
    5. Guest Editorial
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Systematic review
    9. Cutaneous biology
    10. Original articles
    11. Case report
    12. Correspondence
    13. Book Review
    14. Erratum
    15. News and Notices
    16. Plain Language Summaries
    17. Abstracts
    1. Blood microvessel density, lymphatic microvessel density and lymphatic invasion in predicting melanoma metastases: systematic review and meta-analysis (pages 66–77)

      I. Pastushenko, P.B. Vermeulen, F.J. Carapeto, G. Van den Eynden, A. Rutten, M. Ara, L.Y. Dirix and S. Van Laere

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12688

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Both angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis have been recognized as crucial processes in tumour growth and metastasis development.
      • In the last two decades, large numbers of studies evaluating microvessel and lymphatic vessel density in melanoma have been published, many of them reporting contradictory results.

      What does this study add?

      • We performed a systematic review of all published data, followed by meta-analysis, permitting a global evaluation of the existing evidence on the prognostic value of these parameters in melanoma.
  8. Cutaneous biology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorials
    4. Commentaries
    5. Guest Editorial
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Systematic review
    9. Cutaneous biology
    10. Original articles
    11. Case report
    12. Correspondence
    13. Book Review
    14. Erratum
    15. News and Notices
    16. Plain Language Summaries
    17. Abstracts
    1. Upregulated autocrine vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF receptor-2 loop prevents apoptosis in haemangioma-derived endothelial cells (pages 78–86)

      Y. Ji, S. Chen, K. Li, X. Xiao, T. Xu and S. Zheng

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12592

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Haemangioma-derived endothelial cells (HaemECs) exhibit an X-chromosome inactivation pattern of clonality and show upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-2 signalling pathways.
      • Propranolol induces apoptosis in cultured vascular ECs, including HaemECs.

      What does this study add?

      • Compared with ‘normal’ ECs, HaemECs showed increased resistance to apoptosis induced by serum starvation and β-blockers.
      • The upregulated autocrine VEGF/VEGFR-2 loop can induce general resistance to apoptotic stimuli in HaemECs.
  9. Original articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorials
    4. Commentaries
    5. Guest Editorial
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Systematic review
    9. Cutaneous biology
    10. Original articles
    11. Case report
    12. Correspondence
    13. Book Review
    14. Erratum
    15. News and Notices
    16. Plain Language Summaries
    17. Abstracts
    1. Clinical and laboratory investigations

      You have free access to this content
      Treatment patterns, outcomes, and resource utilization of patients with metastatic melanoma in the U.K.: the MELODY study (pages 87–95)

      P. Lorigan, M. Marples, M. Harries, J. Wagstaff, A.G. Dalgleish, R. Osborne, A. Maraveyas, S. Nicholson, N. Davidson, Q. Wang, L. Pericleous, U. Bapat and M.R. Middleton

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12503

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Historically, patients with advanced melanoma have had a very poor prognosis, with limited treatment options outside of clinical trial participation.

      What does this study add?

      • MELODY is the first observational study to provide a detailed description of treatment patterns and outcomes among U.K. patients with advanced melanoma treated in routine clinical practice, providing a historical context for assessing outcomes in the modern era of targeted agents and immunotherapies.
    2. Can tissue dielectric constant measurement aid in differentiating lymphoedema from lipoedema in women with swollen legs? (pages 96–102)

      S. Birkballe, M.R. Jensen, S. Noerregaard, F. Gottrup and T. Karlsmark

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12589

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Distinguishing lipoedema from lymphoedema in women with swollen legs can be difficult and time consuming.
      • Local tissue water content can be quantified using tissue dielectric constant (TDC) measurements.

      What does this study add?

      • TDC values were significantly higher in patients with untreated lymphoedema than in all patients with lipoedema, healthy controls and patients with lymphoedema treated with compression for ≥ 4 weeks.
      • Interobserver agreement was high in ankle and lower-leg measurements but low in foot measurements.
    3. High expression of FOXP3 in primary melanoma is associated with tumour progression (pages 103–109)

      A.L. Gerber, A. Münst, C. Schlapbach, M. Shafighi, D. Kiermeir, R. Hüsler and R.E. Hunger

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12641

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Breslow tumour thickness is the most important prognostic marker for melanoma.
      • The immune system, and especially regulatory mechanisms, are important for tumour control and tumour progression.
      • The transcription factor forkhead box protein (FOXP)3 is specific for regulatory T cells.

      What does this study add?

      • High expression of FOXP3 in the primary melanoma is associated with reduced time to disease progression and reduced overall survival, independent of the tumour thickness.
      • FOXP3 immunohistochemical staining is easy to perform and may be used to detect patients at high risk for tumour progression.
    4. Malignant and benign forms of atrophic papulosis (Köhlmeier–Degos disease): systemic involvement determines the prognosis (pages 110–115)

      A. Theodoridis, A. Konstantinidou, E. Makrantonaki and C.C. Zouboulis

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12642

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Existing information on atrophic papulosis comes mostly from case reports, and there has been no prospective study of the disease.

      What does this study add?

      • The first data on the demographics, epidemiology and prognosis of atrophic papulosis are provided through a prospective cohort study.
      • The previously so-called ‘malignant atrophic papulosis’ (MAP) should be renamed ‘atrophic papulosis’ and classified into a malignant, systemic form (MAP) with severe prognosis and a more common, benign, cutaneous form (benign atrophic papulosis, BAP).
      • The probability of a benign course increases with the duration of BAP, and reaches 97% at 7 years.
    5. You have free access to this content
      Prognostic factors in pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus (pages 116–122)

      M. Saha, B. Bhogal, M.M. Black, D. Cooper, R.W. Vaughan and R.W. Groves

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12630

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Pemphigus typically has a chronic course, although there is great variability in disease duration and time taken to disease remission between individuals with the disease. The reasons for this are unclear.
      • Certain genetic, epidemiological, clinical and immunological factors may be implicated in prognosis of pemphigus.

      What does this study add?

      • This is the first detailed exploration of prognostic factors in both PV and PF in a U.K. population.
      • We have identified that ethnic group, age at presentation, initial intercellular antibody titre and initial desmoglein 3 antibody levels all had a significant impact on prognosis of pemphigus.
    6. Epidemiology and health service and research

      You have free access to this content
      Efficacy of a general practitioner training campaign for early detection of melanoma in France (pages 123–129)

      F. Grange, A.S. Woronoff, R. Bera, M. Colomb, B. Lavole, E. Fournier, F. Arnold and C. Barbe

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12585

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Many secondary prevention campaigns in various countries have failed to show a decrease of either melanoma-related mortality and/or incidence of thick melanomas.
      • No strategy for improving early diagnosis has been evaluated so far on a population basis in France.

      What does this study add?

      • A general practitioner (GP) training campaign was carried out by dermatologists in a French pilot region including 1·34 million inhabitants and 1241 general practitioners.
      • A significant 34% decrease in the incidence of very thick melanomas (Breslow thickness ≥ 3 mm) occurred after the campaign in the target region, along with a decrease in the mean Breslow thickness and an increase in the proportions of thin and in situ melanomas. No variation was observed in a control area where no secondary prevention campaign was conducted.
    7. You have free access to this content
      The natural course of early-onset atopic dermatitis in Taiwan: a population-based cohort study (pages 130–135)

      T.-C. Hua, C.-Y. Hwang, Y.-J. Chen, S.-Y. Chu, C.-C. Chen, D.-D. Lee, Y.-T. Chang, W.-J. Wang and H.-N. Liu

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12603

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Atopic dermatitis (AD) commonly affects infants and children.
      • The natural course of AD varies among individual patients.
      • Spontaneous resolution occurs in some children as they grow older.

      What does this study add?

      • The probability of children with early-onset AD healing in a given time is calculated using nationwide population-based data.
      • About 70% of the patients with early-onset AD went into remission eventually.
      • Presence of allergic rhinitis or asthma did not affect the course of AD.
    8. Risk of second primary malignancies following a diagnosis of cutaneous malignant melanoma or nonmelanoma skin cancer in Alberta, Canada from 1979 to 2009 (pages 136–143)

      G.W. Jung, D.C. Dover and T.G. Salopek

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12694

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Geographical variations in types of second primary malignancies following skin cancers have been noted in recent years.

      What does this study add?

      • Identification of environmental and molecular connections among linked cutaneous and noncutaneous malignancies may lead to earlier detection of related neoplasms via expanded screening protocols and development of shared treatment regimens.
      • Heightened surveillance for development of second primary malignancies in patients with melanoma under 40 years of age should be considered.
    9. You have free access to this content
      Indicators for the total number of melanocytic naevi: an adjunct for screening campaigns. Observational study on 292 patients (pages 144–149)

      B. Echeverría, J.-L. Bulliard, C. Guillén and E. Nagore

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12692

      What's already known about this topic?

      • In order to phenotype or identify at-risk patients in a rapid and practical manner for large-scale studies or screening campaigns, naevus counts on selected body sites can be used as a proxy for total body naevus count.
      • The correlation between site-specific and total body naevus counts appears to be highest for the arms, although results have not been consistent across studies or sexes.

      What does this study add?

      • Our results further support the arm as a practical and reliable site to estimate the total naevus count when screening or phenotyping large populations.
      • Cut-off values of 6, 8 and 11 naevi on the right arm best predicted total naevus count above 25, 50 and 100, respectively.
      • These threshold values provide dermatologists with various degrees of patient risk selection and can be adjusted on an individual basis.
    10. Paediatric dermatology

      Narrowband ultraviolet B phototherapy in children with moderate-to-severe eczema: a comparative cohort study (pages 150–156)

      S. Darné, S.N. Leech and A.E.M. Taylor

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12580

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Second-line therapy for eczema includes narrowband ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) phototherapy on which there is no prospective study in children.
      • A randomized controlled trial in adult eczema has shown NB-UVB to be superior to other phototherapy modalities.
      • National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance 2007 suggests further research into ‘phototherapy in children with severe atopic eczema’ as it is ‘often used…but there are few studies reporting on its effectiveness…’.

      What does this study add?

      • NB-UVB resulted in considerable improvement in objective and quality-of-life scores in children with moderate-to-severe atopic eczema in this comparative cohort study.
      • This effect was well maintained up to 6 months post-treatment.
    11. Photobiology

      Estimating the contribution of occupational solar ultraviolet exposure to skin cancer (pages 157–164)

      A. Milon, J.-L. Bulliard, L. Vuilleumier, B. Danuser and D. Vernez

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12604

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Solar radiation is the most frequent occupational carcinogenic agent in many countries. It is also the main causative factor of skin cancer.
      • Skin cancer is barely recognized as an occupational disease due to a lack of data on the occupational contribution to the overall dose.

      What does this study add?

      • We show the contribution of occupational ultraviolet exposure, in terms of annual (chronic) anatomical dose and acute events, to the risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) for various occupational scenarios.
      • A numerical model (SimUVEx) was used to assess occupational and lunch break exposure, and to characterize exposure patterns and anatomical distribution.
      • Risk of SCC was estimated from an existing epidemiological model.
    12. Photodermatology

      A randomized trial comparing methyl aminolaevulinate photodynamic therapy with and without Er:YAG ablative fractional laser treatment in Asian patients with lower extremity Bowen disease: results from a 12-month follow-up (pages 165–172)

      D.Y. Ko, K.H. Kim and K.H. Song

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12627

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Methyl aminolaevulinate (MAL) photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment for Bowen disease.
      • Use of an Er:YAG ablative fractional laser (AFL) improves the MAL penetration into deeper portions of lesions.

      What does this study add?

      • We show that compared with conventional MAL-PDT, Er:YAG AFL-assisted MAL-PDT provides better efficacy in treating Bowen disease and with fewer sessions.
    13. Therapeutics

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Oral liarozole in the treatment of patients with moderate/severe lamellar ichthyosis: results of a randomized, double-blind, multinational, placebo-controlled phase II/III trial (pages 173–181)

      A. Vahlquist, S. Blockhuys, P. Steijlen, K. van Rossem, B. Didona, D. Blanco and H. Traupe

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12626

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Oral liarozole, a retinoic acid metabolism-blocking agent, may be an alternative to systemic retinoid therapy for patients with lamellar ichthyosis.

      What does this study add?

      • While the primary endpoint was not met, compared with placebo, once-daily oral liarozole, 75 or 150 mg, decreased overall severity and scaling, but not erythema and pruritus, and improved Dermatology Life Quality Index in patients with lamellar ichthyosis.
      • Oral liarozole was well tolerated.
    14. A second look at efficacy criteria for onychomycosis: clinical and mycological cure (pages 182–187)

      M. Ghannoum, N. Isham and V. Catalano

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12594

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Onychomycosis mycological cure is currently defined as a negative KOH and negative dermatophyte culture.

      What does this study add?

      • The current definition of onychomycosis complete cure is too stringent.
      • Microscopy of late-visit samples may demonstrate nonviable hyphae.
      • Onychomycosis cure should be defined as the absence of clinical signs or presence of negative culture, with or without negative microscopy, assessed after an adequate washout period.
    15. Concise communications

      Improvement in precision of counting actinic keratoses (pages 188–191)

      K.C. Lee, R. Lew and M.A. Weinstock, for the VAKCC Trial Group

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12629

      What's already known about this topic?

      • The reliability of counting actinic keratoses (AKs) is poor to fair, even when performed by experienced dermatologists.

      What does this study add?

      • This study examined the utility of a consensus discussion in improving reliability of counting AKs. The consensus discussion was held yearly for 4 years.
      • Annual consensus discussion increased reliability, which improved progressively over 4 years.
    16. Dermoscopy uncovers clinically undetectable pigmentation in basal cell carcinoma (pages 192–195)

      A. Lallas, G. Argenziano, A. Kyrgidis, Z. Apalla, E. Moscarella, C. Longo, G. Ferrara, S. Piana, E. Benati, E. Zendri, E. Sotiriou and I. Zalaudek

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12634

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Dermoscopy is useful in the pre-operative diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC).
      • Management of BCC depends mainly on the histopathological subtype, but is also influenced by the presence of pigmentation, as pigmented BCC is known to respond poorly to certain treatment modalities.

      What does this study add?

      • Dermoscopy has the potential to reveal clinically undetectable pigmentation in BCC, providing additional information that is potentially useful for tumour management.
  10. Case report

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorials
    4. Commentaries
    5. Guest Editorial
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Systematic review
    9. Cutaneous biology
    10. Original articles
    11. Case report
    12. Correspondence
    13. Book Review
    14. Erratum
    15. News and Notices
    16. Plain Language Summaries
    17. Abstracts
    1. Mutations in EXPH5 result in autosomal recessive inherited skin fragility (pages 196–199)

      L. Liu, J.E. Mellerio, A.E. Martinez, J.R. McMillan, S. Aristodemou, M. Parsons and J.A. McGrath

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12723

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of mechanobullous diseases.
      • Recently, autosomal recessive mutations in EXPH5 (encoding exophilin-5, a protein involved in intracellular vesicle transport) were identified in a new clinicopathological subtype of EBS.

      What does this study add?

      • We identified a case with new compound heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in EXPH5.
      • The clues to diagnosis came from transmission electron microscopy, with ultrastructural findings of abnormal intracellular vesicles in basal keratinocytes leading to keratin filament aggregation, cytolysis and acantholysis.
      • This study highlights an important and unexpected role for exophilin-5 in maintaining skin integrity.
  11. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorials
    4. Commentaries
    5. Guest Editorial
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Systematic review
    9. Cutaneous biology
    10. Original articles
    11. Case report
    12. Correspondence
    13. Book Review
    14. Erratum
    15. News and Notices
    16. Plain Language Summaries
    17. Abstracts
    1. Generalized syringotropic mycosis fungoides responsive to extracorporeal photopheresis (pages 200–202)

      L. Jennings, S.M. Campbell, R. Yaar, M. Mahalingam, D. Sahni, A. Lerner and T.M. Rünger

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12547

    2. Botulinum toxin for focal hyperhidrosis of the face (pages 211–213)

      S.M.C. George, L.R. Atkinson, P.B.J. Farrant and B.S. Shergill

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12568

    3. Pancake syndrome induced by ingestion of tempura (pages 213–214)

      H. Hashizume, T. Umayahara and Y. Kawakami

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12597

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
    5. Anorectal necrosis after paracetamol abuse (pages 217–218)

      E. Streit, P. Gholam, E. Hadaschik and W. Hartschuh

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12595

    6. Clinical patterns of lichen planopilaris in patients with vulval lichen planus (pages 218–220)

      A. Chew, C.M. Stefanato, I. Savarese, S.M. Neill, D.A. Fenton and F.M. Lewis

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12609

    7. Lichen sclerosus associated with perineal urethrostomy (pages 222–223)

      T.N. Shim, D.E. Andrich, A.R. Mundy and C.B. Bunker

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12617

  12. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorials
    4. Commentaries
    5. Guest Editorial
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Systematic review
    9. Cutaneous biology
    10. Original articles
    11. Case report
    12. Correspondence
    13. Book Review
    14. Erratum
    15. News and Notices
    16. Plain Language Summaries
    17. Abstracts
  13. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorials
    4. Commentaries
    5. Guest Editorial
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Systematic review
    9. Cutaneous biology
    10. Original articles
    11. Case report
    12. Correspondence
    13. Book Review
    14. Erratum
    15. News and Notices
    16. Plain Language Summaries
    17. Abstracts
    1. You have free access to this content
  14. News and Notices

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorials
    4. Commentaries
    5. Guest Editorial
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Systematic review
    9. Cutaneous biology
    10. Original articles
    11. Case report
    12. Correspondence
    13. Book Review
    14. Erratum
    15. News and Notices
    16. Plain Language Summaries
    17. Abstracts
  15. Plain Language Summaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorials
    4. Commentaries
    5. Guest Editorial
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Systematic review
    9. Cutaneous biology
    10. Original articles
    11. Case report
    12. Correspondence
    13. Book Review
    14. Erratum
    15. News and Notices
    16. Plain Language Summaries
    17. Abstracts
  16. Abstracts

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorials
    4. Commentaries
    5. Guest Editorial
    6. Scholarly reviews
    7. Review articles
    8. Systematic review
    9. Cutaneous biology
    10. Original articles
    11. Case report
    12. Correspondence
    13. Book Review
    14. Erratum
    15. News and Notices
    16. Plain Language Summaries
    17. Abstracts

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