British Journal of Dermatology

Cover image for Vol. 170 Issue 5

May 2014

Volume 170, Issue 5

Pages i–i, 1003–1207, e1–e5

  1. Editor's Choice

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting Papers into Practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Systematic review
    8. Cutaneous biology
    9. Original articles
    10. Case reports
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and Notices
    13. Plain Language Summaries
    1. Editor's Choice (page i)

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.13031

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting Papers into Practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Systematic review
    8. Cutaneous biology
    9. Original articles
    10. Case reports
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and Notices
    13. Plain Language Summaries
    1. You have free access to this content
    2. You have free access to this content
      What's in a disease name? (pages 1005–1007)

      E. Sprecher

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.13019

      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Errata

      Vol. 170, Issue 6, 1382, Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014

  3. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting Papers into Practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Systematic review
    8. Cutaneous biology
    9. Original articles
    10. Case reports
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and Notices
    13. Plain Language Summaries
  4. Putting Papers into Practice

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting Papers into Practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Systematic review
    8. Cutaneous biology
    9. Original articles
    10. Case reports
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and Notices
    13. Plain Language Summaries
    1. Response to ‘Interventions for mycosis fungoides: critical commentary on a Cochrane Systematic Review' (page 1020)

      T. Weberschock, R. Strametz, J. Schmitt and for the Cochrane Review Team ‘Interventions for mycosis fungoides’

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12959

  5. Review articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting Papers into Practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Systematic review
    8. Cutaneous biology
    9. Original articles
    10. Case reports
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and Notices
    13. Plain Language Summaries
    1. Alcohol drinking and cutaneous melanoma risk: a systematic review and dose–risk meta-analysis (pages 1021–1028)

      M. Rota, E. Pasquali, R. Bellocco, V. Bagnardi, L. Scotti, F. Islami, E. Negri, P. Boffetta, C. Pelucchi, G. Corrao and C. La Vecchia

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12856

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Alcohol drinking increases sunburn severity, a major risk factor for cutaneous melanoma.
      • Several epidemiological studies have investigated the relationship between alcohol consumption and cutaneous melanoma, but the evidence is inconsistent.

      What does this study add?

      • We found a 20% increased risk of cutaneous melanoma with regular alcohol drinking.
    2. The dermatology outpatient discharge decision: understanding a critical but neglected process (pages 1029–1038)

      N.A. Harun, S. Salek, V. Piguet and A.Y. Finlay

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12826

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Discharge decision making is a complex and critical process.
      • There is no defined strategy on how to carry out an appropriate discharge in the dermatology outpatient setting.

      What does this study add?

      • Influences on discharge decision making relate to disease, clinician, patient and practice setting.
      • The clinician's judgement plays a central role in discharge decision making and needs further exploration.
      • Intuition and bias influence the process of discharge decision making.
  6. Systematic review

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting Papers into Practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Systematic review
    8. Cutaneous biology
    9. Original articles
    10. Case reports
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and Notices
    13. Plain Language Summaries
    1. Oral proliferative verrucous leucoplakia: are there particular features for such an ambiguous entity? A systematic review (pages 1039–1047)

      M. Pentenero, M. Meleti, P. Vescovi and S. Gandolfo

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12853

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Results from a few observational studies have depicted proliferative verrucous leucoplakia (PVL) as a particular form of an oral, potentially malignant disorder.

      What does this study add?

      • This systematic literature review assesses the levels of evidence on PVL features previously reported (high malignant transformation rate, particular site distribution, particular location and histopathological features of transformation) and collates the actual evidence from the literature.
      • A correct interpretation of clinical features of multifocal oral leucoplakias is mandatory for correct identification of PVL.
  7. Cutaneous biology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting Papers into Practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Systematic review
    8. Cutaneous biology
    9. Original articles
    10. Case reports
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and Notices
    13. Plain Language Summaries
    1. Interferon-γ/CCR5 expression in invariant natural killer T cells and CCL5 expression in capillary veins of dermal papillae correlate with development of psoriasis vulgaris (pages 1048–1055)

      F. Kono, T. Honda, W. Aini, T. Manabe, H. Haga and T. Tsuruyama

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12812

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Natural killer (NK)T cells are present in psoriasis plaques, and injection of NKT cells into transplanted psoriatic skin drives lesion formation.
      • Imbalance of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 contributes to lesion development.
      • Injection of IL-4 into the plaque ameliorates psoriasis.

      What does this study add?

      • Invariant NK (iNK)T-cell number correlates with the length of the rete ridge, and with the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index, epidermal hyperplasia and degree of microabscess formation.
      • iNKT cells in psoriatic skin have higher CCR5 expression, and the CCR5+ iNKT-cell count correlates with that of CCL5+ capillaries in dermal papillae.
      • The CCL5+ capillary endothelial cell count correlates with epidermal hyperplasia.
    2. A truncating mutation in the laminin-332α chain highlights the role of the LG45 proteolytic domain in regulating keratinocyte adhesion and migration (pages 1056–1064)

      G. Di Zenzo, M. El Hachem, A. Diociaiuti, R. Boldrini, V. Calabresi, F. Cianfarani, P. Fortugno, E. Piccinni, G. Zambruno and D. Castiglia

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12816

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Exceptionally, homozygous null mutations in laminin-332 genes cause junctional epidermolysis bullosa-non Herlitz (JEB-nH).
      • The C-terminal globules 4 and 5 (LG45) of laminin-332 influence in vitro cell adhesion and promote in vivo squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) progression.

      What does this study add?

      • A naturally occurring frame-shift mutation in the penultimate LAMA3 exon results in stable mRNA and synthesis of a truncated α3 chain, which causes intracellular protein retention.
      • Secreted and deposited laminin-332 with truncated LG5 globule induces keratinocyte migration.
      • Perturbation of LG45 specific functions is critical for JEB-nH pathogenesis and might influence SCC progression in JEB-nH adults.
  8. Original articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting Papers into Practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Systematic review
    8. Cutaneous biology
    9. Original articles
    10. Case reports
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and Notices
    13. Plain Language Summaries
    1. Clinical and laboratory investigations

      Proposal for a clinical–dermoscopic classification of scalp naevi (pages 1065–1072)

      I. Zalaudek, K. Schmid, A. Niederkorn, R. Fink-Puches, E. Richtig, I. Wolf and R. Hofmann-Wellenhof

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12722

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Recent research has identified that scalp naevi differ with respect to their epidemiology and morphological features.

      What does this study add?

      • This study reveals that scalp naevi can be categorized into six main groups based on a clinical–dermoscopic correlation.
    2. Plain radiography is effective for the detection of calcinosis cutis occurring in association with autoimmune connective tissue disease (pages 1073–1079)

      V. Shahi, D.A. Wetter, B.M. Howe, M.D. Ringler and M.D.P. Davis

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12785

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Radiological studies can detect calcinosis cutis occurring in association with autoimmune connective tissue disease (ACTD).
      • Studies on the radiological findings of calcinosis cutis in patients with ACTD are limited.

      What does this study add?

      • Plain radiography detected calcinosis in all patients and is recommended for initial imaging of calcinosis associated with ACTD.
      • Multiple morphological patterns of calcification (nodular, sheet-like, reticular, amorphous, linear) were observed across ACTD subtypes and were not specific to ACTD subtype.
    3. Quantitation of tumour development correlates with prognosis in tumour stage (stage IIB) mycosis fungoides (pages 1080–1086)

      S.E. Boonk, H. Putter, L. Koolhof, R. Willemze and M.H. Vermeer

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12763

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Clinical observations show considerable variation in the number of tumours and time interval between each tumour occasion in patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) stage IIB.
      • The correlation with differences in disease course and survival remains unclear.

      What does this study add?

      • The differences in number of tumours and time interval between tumour formation among patients with MF stage IIB correlate with survival.
      • Patients with an adverse prognosis can be identified by quantifying the number of tumours.
    4. Burden of disease during quiescent periods in patients with pemphigus (pages 1087–1091)

      S. Tabolli, C. Pagliarello, A. Paradisi, G. Cianchini, P. Giannantoni and D. Abeni

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12836

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Pemphigus has a severe impact on quality of life.
      • Patients with pemphigus have an increased risk of anxiety and depression.
      • Following treatment, pemphigus may have long periods of quiescence.

      What does this study add?

      • Quality of life is significantly impacted also in patients without bullae/erosions, and in women it is worse than in men.
      • High percentages of patients are at risk of anxiety and depression even when the disease is quiescent.
      • The burden of disease continues to be present even during periods of relative wellness.
    5. You have free access to this content
      Genetic polymorphisms in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) and risk of vitiligo in Han Chinese populations: a genotype–phenotype correlation study (pages 1092–1099)

      J.-X. Chen, Q. Shi, X.-W. Wang, S. Guo, W. Dai, K. Li, P. Song, C. Wei, G. Wang, C.-Y. Li and T.-W. Gao

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12845

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Previous findings have suggested that patients with vitiligo have an elevated level of total homocysteine.
      • Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is an enzyme affecting homocysteine metabolism, and polymorphisms of the MTHFR gene impact the enzyme's activity.

      What does this study add?

      • Our study demonstrates the association between functional mutations of the MTHFR gene and vitiligo susceptibility.
    6. Cutaneous allergy

      Two-year follow-up survey of patients with allergic contact dermatitis from an occupational cohort: is the prognosis dependent on the omnipresence of the allergen? (pages 1100–1105)

      K.K.B. Clemmensen, T.K. Carøe, S.F. Thomsen, N.E. Ebbehøj and T. Agner

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12795

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Skin conditions are the most frequently recognized occupational diseases in Denmark, and contact dermatitis constitutes more than 90% of these.
      • The prognosis for occupational contact dermatitis is often poor.

      What does this study add?

      • Quality of life (QoL) was less impaired in patients with relevant occupational contact allergy to a nonubiquitous allergen, and there was a trend that total clearance of eczema was more frequent for this group.
      • Patients with contact urticaria had significantly less frequent clearance, less improvement in eczema and most impairment of QoL at follow-up.
      • A significant positive association between job change and improvement was found.
    7. Dermatological surgery and lasers

      You have free access to this content
      Full-thickness skin grafts for surgical defects of the nasal ala – a comprehensive review, approach and outcomes of 186 cases over 9 years (pages 1106–1113)

      E. Tan, N. Mortimer and P. Salmon

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12792

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Various flaps and techniques have been described to reconstruct surgical defects of the ala.
      • Full-thickness skin grafts have received little attention in the reconstructive literature, particularly for nasal ala defects.

      What does this study add?

      • Skin grafting for partial-thickness defects of the nasal ala can yield excellent aesthetic and functional outcomes.
      • In < 50% of cases, dermabrasion was chosen to optimize aesthetic outcomes.
      • The need for dermabrasion was not related to patient, tumour or surgical factors.
      • We provide a comprehensive review and algorithm for repair of nasal ala defects.
    8. Cryotherapy is preferable to ablative CO2 laser for the treatment of isolated actinic keratoses of the face and scalp: a randomized clinical trial (pages 1114–1121)

      C. Zane, E. Facchinetti, M.T. Rossi, C. Specchia, B. Ortel and P. Calzavara-Pinton

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12847

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Actinic keratosis (AK) has the potential to progress to squamous cell carcinoma.
      • If single or few AKs develop on normal or mildly photodamaged skin, lesion-directed treatments are considered valuable options despite poor knowledge of their therapeutic activity.

      What does this study add?

      • The rate of patients with complete remission and lesions with complete remission is similar after 3 months after both cryotherapy and CO2 laser treatment, but with cryotherapy more patients remain in stable remission after 12 months.
      • Cryotherapy is also more effective for thick lesions.
    9. Epidemiology and health services research

      Herpes zoster infection associated with acute coronary syndrome: a population-based retrospective cohort study (pages 1122–1129)

      C.-C. Wang, C.-L. Lin, Y.-J. Chang, G.-J. Wang, F.-C. Sung and C.-H. Kao

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12768

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • The relationships between coronary heart diseases and Chlamydia pneumonia, Helicobacter pylori, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, influenza and periodontal infections have been investigated.
      • No population-based cohort study has investigated the association between herpes zoster infection and the development of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in people.

      What does this study add?

      • The incidence of ACS was 1·24-fold higher in the herpes zoster group than in the control group.
      • The incidence of ACS remained significantly higher in the herpes zoster group than in the control group, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1·14 after the 1-year follow-up period.
    10. You have free access to this content
      A population-based study of the incidence of delusional infestation in Olmsted County, Minnesota, 1976–2010 (pages 1130–1135)

      C.H. Bailey, L.K. Andersen, G.C. Lowe, M.R. Pittelkow, J.M. Bostwick and M.D.P. Davis

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12848

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Population-based studies of the incidence of delusional infestation (DI), a disorder with dermatological and psychological components, have not been performed.

      What does this study add?

      • While still rare, DI is more common than previously estimated. The annual incidence was 1·9 (95% confidence interval 1·5–2·4) per 100 000 person-years. Mean age at diagnosis was 61·4 years (range 9–92), and incidence increased with age and time.
    11. You have free access to this content
      Epidemiology and extracutaneous comorbidities of severe acne in adolescence: a U.S. population-based study (pages 1136–1142)

      J.I. Silverberg and N.B. Silverberg

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12912

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Little is known about racial, ethnic or socioeconomic differences of severe acne prevalence or about the medical comorbid disorders with severe acne.

      What does this study add?

      • Severe acne is more prevalent in older age, Whites, female sex and higher socioeconomic status.
      • Severe acne was associated with higher prevalences of one or more sinopulmonary, gastrointestinal and psychological comorbid disorders.
      • The results of this study suggest that patients with severe acne are at higher risk for many comorbidities and warrant closer surveillance by dermatologists and primary care healthcare providers alike.
    12. Photobiology

      You have free access to this content
      A randomized clinical trial of photodynamic therapy with methyl aminolaevulinate vs. diclofenac 3% plus hyaluronic acid gel for the treatment of multiple actinic keratoses of the face and scalp (pages 1143–1150)

      C. Zane, E. Facchinetti, M.T. Rossi, C. Specchia and P.G. Calzavara-Pinton

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12844

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • A gel containing diclofenac and hyaluronic acid (DHA) and photodynamic therapy with methyl aminolaevulinate (MAL-PDT) are widely used for the treatment of actinic keratoses (AKs).

      What does this study add?

      • Efficacy, cosmetic outcome and patients' overall satisfaction with MAL-PDT were superior in comparison with DHA.
      • Both treatments are very well tolerated. Although the treatment cycle with MAL-PDT is more expensive, a cost-effectiveness analysis shows that it is more cost-effective.
    13. Therapeutics

      You have free access to this content
      Simvastatin as a novel therapeutic agent for venous ulcers: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (pages 1151–1157)

      M.T.P. Evangelista, M.F.A. Casintahan and L.L. Villafuerte

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12883

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • The standard treatment for venous ulcers is compression therapy, but drugs may be used as adjunctive therapy to accelerate the healing process.
      • Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that may also have pleiotropic effects, which accelerate wound healing. However, supporting evidence for this is mainly from animal studies.
      • There are no previous studies investigating the use of statins for venous ulcers.

      What does this study add?

      • This is the first study to investigate the use of statins (simvastatin 40 mg daily) in venous ulcer healing.
      • This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial showed that simvastatin, in addition to standard wound care and compression, is associated with a significant improvement in healing rate and time, as well as an improved patient quality of life when compared with placebo in the management of venous ulcers. No adverse effects were documented.
    14. You have free access to this content
      Satisfaction of treatment with biologics is high in psoriasis: results from the Bio-CAPTURE network (pages 1158–1165)

      J.M.P.A. van den Reek, P.P.M. van Lüumig, M.E. Otero, J. Zweegers, P.C.M. van de Kerkhof, P.M. Ossenkoppele, M.D. Njoo, J.M. Mommers, M.I.A. Koetsier, W.P. Arnold, B.A.M. Sybrandy-Fleuren, A.L.A. Kuijpers, M.P.M. Andriessen, M.M.B. Seyger, W. Kievit and E.M.G.J. de Jong

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12862

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Maximum satisfaction with medication is thought to be positively related to adherence, health-related quality of life and patients' preferences.
      • As shown in cross-sectional research, patients' dissatisfaction with treatment plays an important role in psoriasis. Those receiving biologics are the most satisfied with treatment among patients with psoriasis.
      • In an open-label extension trial with etanercept, significant improvement in the ‘global satisfaction’, ‘effectiveness’ and ‘convenience’ domains was achieved after 3 months of treatment.

      What does this study add?

      • A prospective, longitudinal study on satisfaction with etanercept, adalimumab and ustekinumab for patients with psoriasis in daily practice.
      • Significantly improved satisfaction rates (using the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication) were achieved after 3 and 6 months. As reported by the patients, the ‘effectiveness’ and ‘convenience’ domains showed the most room for improvement.
      • After 6 months, biologics-inexperienced patients scored significantly better on the ‘global satisfaction’ domain than experienced patients.
      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Errata

      Vol. 170, Issue 6, 1382, Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014

    15. Concise communications

      Aetiologies of creeping eruption: 78 cases (pages 1166–1169)

      C. Vanhaecke, A. Perignon, G. Monsel, S. Regnier, L. Paris and E. Caumes

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12637

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • As hookworm-related cutaneous larva migrans (HrCLM) is the most common cause of creeping eruption, the disease HrCLM and the sign of creeping eruption have been confused for a long time.

      What does this study add?

      • This is the first study to report the different aetiologies of creeping eruption and show that, besides HrCLM, several diseases can give rise to this clinical sign.
    16. Melanoma associated with tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitors: a Research on Adverse Drug events And Reports (RADAR) project (pages 1170–1172)

      B. Nardone, J.A. Hammel, D.W. Raisch, L.L. Weaver, D. Schneider and D.P. West

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12779

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitors (TNFαIs) have been linked with the occurrence of malignancies, including melanoma.
      • A statistical association has not yet been clarified.

      What does this study add?

      • A safety signal was detected in the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System database.
      • Enhanced monitoring for patients receiving TNFαIs is therefore warranted.
    17. Facial and extrafacial eosinophilic pustular folliculitis: a clinical and histopathological comparative study (pages 1173–1176)

      W.J. Lee, K.H. Won, C.H. Won, S.E. Chang, J.H. Choi, K.C. Moon and M.W. Lee

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12755

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Although the eruption of eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (EPF) primarily affects the face, rare lesions may be located at extrafacial sites.

      What does this study add?

      • The clinical features and histopathological findings of facial and extrafacial EPF are different.
      • These differences suggest that different pathogenic mechanisms may participate in the development of EPF, depending on the affected site.
  9. Case reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting Papers into Practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Systematic review
    8. Cutaneous biology
    9. Original articles
    10. Case reports
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and Notices
    13. Plain Language Summaries
    1. A case of xanthoma disseminatum: evaluation and monitoring by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (pages 1177–1181)

      S. Jin, S.Y. Chae, S.E. Chang, C. Suh, S.W. Lee and J.S. Ryu

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12789

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Xanthoma disseminatum (XD) is a rare benign histiocytic disorder with extensive mucocutaneous xanthomas that often involves other sites such as the central nervous system, respiratory tract and abdominal organs.
      • Evaluation of disease extent is important because lesions in critical locations may increase morbidity and mortality but there are no established therapeutic and monitoring tools for the disease.

      What does this study add?

      • This case report shows that 18F- fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography is useful for determining the disease extent of XD and for estimating the therapeutic response.
    2. Generalized verrucosis in a patient with GATA2 deficiency (pages 1182–1186)

      E.S. West, M.Y. Kingsbery, E.M. Mintz, A.P. Hsu, S.M. Holland, P.L. Rady, S.K. Tyring and M.E. Grossman

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12794

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      What's already known about this topic?

      • Generalized verrucosis is characteristic of several immunodeficiency disorders and is often resistant to conventional therapy.
      • GATA2 deficiency is a novel genetic immunodeficiency characterized by monocytopenia and lymphopenia with a tendency to develop myeloid leukaemias and disseminated mycobacterial, human papillomavirus and opportunistic fungal infections.

      What does this study add?

      • We present a case of generalized verrucosis in a patient with GATA2 deficiency.
      • GATA2 deficiency should be considered within the differential diagnosis for patients with generalized verrucosis.
  10. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting Papers into Practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Systematic review
    8. Cutaneous biology
    9. Original articles
    10. Case reports
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and Notices
    13. Plain Language Summaries
    1. The novel SLCO2A1 heterozygous missense mutation p.E427K and nonsense mutation p.R603* in a female patient with pachydermoperiostosis with an atypical phenotype (pages 1187–1189)

      H. Niizeki, A. Shiohama, T. Sasaki, A. Seki, K. Kabashima, A. Otsuka, M. Takeshita, A. Hirakiyama, T. Okuyama, K. Tanese, A. Ishiko, M. Amagai and J. Kudoh

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12790

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      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Errata

      Vol. 170, Issue 6, 1382–1383, Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014

    2. A case of concurrent pemphigoid vegetans and pemphigus vegetans resolving without oral corticosteroid (pages 1192–1194)

      Y. Hatano, K. Ishikawa, H. Koga, N. Ishii, T. Hashimoto, N. Takeo, H. Shimada, T. Sakai, O. Okamoto and S. Fujiwara

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12802

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    3. Photolocalized varicella in an adult (pages 1195–1196)

      M. Sakiyama, H. Maeshima, T. Higashino and Y. Kawakubo

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12814

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    4. Increased epidermal expression and absence of mutations in CARD14 in a series of patients with sporadic pityriasis rubra pilaris (pages 1196–1198)

      O. Eytan, L. Qiaoli, J. Nousbeck, M.A.M. van Steensel, B. Burger, D. Hohl, A. Taïeb, S. Prey, D. Bachmann, E. Avitan-Hersh, H. Jin Chung, A. Shemer, H. Trau, R. Bergman, D. Fuchs-Telem, E. Warshauer, S. Israeli, P.H. Itin, O. Sarig, J. Uitto and E. Sprecher

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12799

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    5. Prolonged remission of Paget disease of the vulva after chemotherapy for breast carcinoma (pages 1199–1200)

      V. Tauveron, G. Body, L. Machet, H. Lenain, L. Ouldamer and G. Lorette

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12825

    6. Two cases of pseudolymphoma on the lips (pages 1204–1206)

      N. Haga, W. Nishie, H. Hata, T. Miyauchi, K. Muramatsu, S. Kitamura, R. Osawa and H. Shimizu

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12837

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  11. News and Notices

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting Papers into Practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Systematic review
    8. Cutaneous biology
    9. Original articles
    10. Case reports
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and Notices
    13. Plain Language Summaries
    1. News and Notices (pages 1206–1207)

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.13042

  12. Plain Language Summaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Putting Papers into Practice
    6. Review articles
    7. Systematic review
    8. Cutaneous biology
    9. Original articles
    10. Case reports
    11. Correspondence
    12. News and Notices
    13. Plain Language Summaries
    1. You have free access to this content
      Plain Language Summaries (pages e1–e5)

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.13020

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