British Journal of Dermatology

Cover image for Vol. 170 Issue 6

June 2014

Volume 170, Issue 6

Pages i–i, 1209–1391, e1–e61

  1. Editor's Choice

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Cutaneous biology
    8. Original articles
    9. Case report
    10. Correspondence
    11. Corrigendum
    12. Errata
    13. News and Notices
    14. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    15. Abstracts
    16. Plain language summaries
    1. You have free access to this content
      Editor's Choice (page i)

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.13063

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Cutaneous biology
    8. Original articles
    9. Case report
    10. Correspondence
    11. Corrigendum
    12. Errata
    13. News and Notices
    14. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    15. Abstracts
    16. Plain language summaries
    1. You have free access to this content
    2. You have free access to this content
  3. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Cutaneous biology
    8. Original articles
    9. Case report
    10. Correspondence
    11. Corrigendum
    12. Errata
    13. News and Notices
    14. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    15. Abstracts
    16. Plain language summaries
    1. Type VII collagen and squamous cell carcinoma (page 1215)

      E.A. O'Toole

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12868

      ORIGINAL ARTICLE, p 1256

  4. Review articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Cutaneous biology
    8. Original articles
    9. Case report
    10. Correspondence
    11. Corrigendum
    12. Errata
    13. News and Notices
    14. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    15. Abstracts
    16. Plain language summaries
    1. You have free access to this content
      Human demodicosis: revisit and a proposed classification (pages 1219–1225)

      W. Chen and G. Plewig

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12850

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • The pathogenicity of human Demodex mites in inflammatory skin diseases remains controversial.

      What does this study add?

      • A new classification is proposed to divide human demodicosis into a primary form and a secondary form associated with other local or systemic diseases.
      • The recognition of primary human demodicosis as a disease sui generis will enable clinicians to differentiate it from other mimicking inflammatory dermatoses and encourage the development of a specific effective treatment.
    2. Prognostic factors, prognostic indices and staging in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: where are we now? (pages 1226–1236)

      J.J. Scarisbrick, Y.H. Kim, S.J. Whittaker, G.S. Wood, M.H. Vermeer, H.M. Prince and P. Quaglino

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12909

      What's already known about topic?

      • The European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer/International Society for Cutaneous Lymphoma published a revised staging system for mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome (MF/SS) in 2007 to include tumour, node, metastasis and blood involvement at diagnosis.
      • Survival in MF/SS is diverse and ranges from months to decades.
      • Factors outside staging affect survival.

      What does this study add?

      • This is a review of clinical, haematological, pathological and genotypic changes affecting survival in MF/SS.
      • The development of an international prognostic index to be adopted alongside staging may aid the management of patients.
  5. Systematic review

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Cutaneous biology
    8. Original articles
    9. Case report
    10. Correspondence
    11. Corrigendum
    12. Errata
    13. News and Notices
    14. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    15. Abstracts
    16. Plain language summaries
    1. Diagnostic accuracy of noninvasive markers of liver fibrosis in patients with psoriasis taking methotrexate: a systematic review and meta-analysis (pages 1237–1247)

      C.M. Maybury, E. Samarasekera, A. Douiri, J.N. Barker and C.H. Smith

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12905

      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Methotrexate may confer an increased risk of liver fibrosis in people with psoriasis, and suspected liver fibrosis is a common reason for treatment discontinuation.
      • There is uncertainty about the best method to identify liver fibrosis in this population and clinical practice varies.

      What does this study add?

      • Liver function tests demonstrate low diagnostic accuracy for the detection of fibrosis.
      • Likelihood ratios for procollagen-3 N-terminal peptide (P3NP) were suboptimal for it to be considered a ‘good test’.
      • Larger studies are needed to further assess newer tests (including Fibroscan®) in the review population.
  6. Cutaneous biology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Cutaneous biology
    8. Original articles
    9. Case report
    10. Correspondence
    11. Corrigendum
    12. Errata
    13. News and Notices
    14. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    15. Abstracts
    16. Plain language summaries
    1. Lipid to protein ratio plays an important role in the skin barrier function in patients with atopic eczema (pages 1248–1255)

      M. Janssens, J. van Smeden, G.J. Puppels, A.P.M. Lavrijsen, P.J. Caspers and J.A. Bouwstra

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12908

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Filaggrin mutations are a predisposing factor for atopic eczema (AE).
      • In nonlesional and lesional stratum corneum (SC) of patients with AE the intercellular lipid composition and organization are altered.
      • Changes in the SC lipid properties correlate with a reduced skin barrier function, but are not associated with filaggrin mutations.

      What does this study add?

      • The dry SC mass, being a measure for SC thickness, is only lower in lesional AE SC compared with SC from controls.
      • The lipid/protein ratio in SC is reduced in both nonlesional and lesional SC of patients with AE and strongly correlates with the impaired skin barrier function and disease severity of patients with AE.
      • The lipid/protein ratio plays a more important role in the impaired skin barrier of AE than the SC thickness.
  7. Original articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Cutaneous biology
    8. Original articles
    9. Case report
    10. Correspondence
    11. Corrigendum
    12. Errata
    13. News and Notices
    14. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    15. Abstracts
    16. Plain language summaries
    1. Clinical and laboratory investigations

      High levels of type VII collagen expression in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma keratinocytes increases PI3K and MAPK signalling, cell migration and invasion (pages 1256–1265)

      C. Pourreyron, M. Chen, J.A. McGrath, J.C. Salas-Alanis, A.P. South and I.M. Leigh

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12715

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Recombinant type VII collagen induces invasion of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) keratinocytes transformed with oncogenic Ras and IκBαM via activation of the PI3K pathway.

      What does this study add?

      • High levels of type VII collagen expression induce increased migration and invasion in RDEB cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma keratinocytes and a concurrent increase in activation of the PI3K pathway.
      • Therapeutic efforts to restore type VII collagen expression in patients with RDEB should be mindful of increasing protein levels above endogenous levels.
    2. A specific DNA methylation profile correlates with a high risk of disease progression in stage I classical (Alibert-Bazin type) mycosis fungoides (pages 1266–1275)

      G. Ferrara, M. Pancione, C. Votino, P. Quaglino, C. Tomasini, M. Santucci, N. Pimpinelli, F. Cusano, L. Sabatino and V. Colantuoni

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12717

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • A subset of patients with stage I mycosis fungoides (MF) experiences a rapidly aggressive course with relatively fast extracutaneous spread and unfavourable prognosis.

      What does this study add?

      • Promoter methylation of specific biomarkers can predict the risk of disease progression in early stage MF.
      • PPARG methylation is a significant predictor of disease progression within 6 years.
      • This epigenetic profile, in vitro, can be changed back by epigenetic drugs that restore sensitivity to apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.
    3. Reflectance confocal microscopy of mucosal pigmented macules: a review of 56 cases including 10 macular melanomas (pages 1276–1284)

      S. Debarbieux, J.L. Perrot, N. Erfan, S. Ronger-Savlé, B. Labeille, E. Cinotti, L. Depaepe, N. Cardot-Leccia, J.P. Lacour, L. Thomas, P. Bahadoran and forthe Groupe d'Imagerie Cutanée Non Invasive de la Société Française de Dermatologie

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12803

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) features of skin pigmented lesions are well documented but it is not known whether they can be extrapolated to mucosal pigmented lesions.

      What does this study add?

      • We describe the RCM patterns observed in benign and malignant pigmented macules.
      • Knowledge of these patterns can avoid unnecessary biopsies and help to target biopsies appropriately.
    4. You have free access to this content
      Which factors predict incident pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients? A prospective cohort study (pages 1285–1290)

      T. Petzold, M. Eberlein-Gonska and J. Schmitt

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12915

      • image
      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Although the prevention of pressure ulcer (PU) during inpatient treatment is an important public health issue, predictors of incident PU in hospitalized patients and the performance of existing PU risk assessment instruments are unclear.

      What does this study add?

      • This large prospective cohort study identified higher age, female sex, length of hospitalization, treatment on intensive care unit and admission from care facility as independent predictors for incident PU in hospitalized patients.
      • The performance of the Braden Scale to assess the individual PU risk differs between normal care and intensive care units, with better performance on normal care units.
    5. Destruction of the arrector pili muscle and fat infiltration in androgenic alopecia (pages 1291–1298)

      N. Torkamani, N.W. Rufaut, L. Jones and R. Sinclair

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12921

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Androgenic alopecia (AGA) is the most common hair loss condition in men and women and is largely irreversible beyond a certain degree of follicular regression.
      • Telogen effluvium is a reversible hair loss condition known to have histological features similar to normal hair.
      • The arrector pili muscle (APM) connects the follicle to the surrounding skin.

      What does this study add?

      • The replacement of APM with fat tissue is a consistent feature of AGA.
      • Replacement is more extensive in smaller follicles, suggesting that it is a progressive process associated with miniaturization.
    6. Vitamin D deficiency in alopecia areata (pages 1299–1304)

      A. Aksu Cerman, S. Sarikaya Solak and I. Kivanc Altunay

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12980

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Alopecia areata (AA) is considered to be a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease characterized by patchy loss of hair from the scalp and other body parts.
      • Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated in different autoimmune disorders.

      What does this study add?

      • Deficient serum vitamin D levels are present in patients with AA and are inversely correlated with disease severity.
    7. Dermatological surgery and lasers

      Surveillance for treatment failure of lentigo maligna with dermoscopy and in vivo confocal microscopy: new descriptors (pages 1305–1312)

      P. Guitera, L.E. Haydu, S.W. Menzies, R.A. Scolyer, A. Hong, G.B. Fogarty, F. Gallardo and S. Segura

      Version of Record online: 22 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12839

      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Clinical diagnosis of recurrent lentigo maligna (LM) following treatment is challenging because treatment-induced inflammation and pigmentation are common, but so are amelanotic recurrences.

      What does this study add?

      • We tested the sensitivity and specificity of individual features and methods using dermoscopy and in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy for the diagnosis of LM and give recommendations for management.
    8. Dermatopathology

      Morphological and morphometric study of the androgenetic alopecic scalp using two- and three-dimensional analysis comparing regional differences (pages 1313–1318)

      J.N. Kim, J.Y. Lee, K.J. Shin, Y.C. Gil, K.S. Koh and W.C. Song

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12842

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Male androgenetic alopecia is the most frequent type of thinning or loss of hair in men.

      What does this study add?

      • The proportion of vellus hairs is significantly higher in the frontal region (86%) than in the occipital region (22%; < 0·01).

      • The sebaceous lobules size are larger in the alopecic frontal scalp than in the normal frontal (< 0·05) and alopecic occipital scalp (< 0·01).

      • This study is the first to examine morphological change and compare alopecia using a three-dimensional reconstruction and image analyser.

    9. Epidemiology and health services research

      You have free access to this content
      Mortality of bullous pemphigoid in Singapore: risk factors and causes of death in 359 patients seen at the National Skin Centre (pages 1319–1326)

      S.C.S. Cai, J.C. Allen, Y.L. Lim, S.H. Chua, S.H. Tan and M.B.Y. Tang

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12806

      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most common subepidermal blistering skin disease and is associated with significant morbidity.
      • Patients with BP have an increased mortality rate compared with the general population in Western cohorts.

      What does this study add?

      • This is the first comprehensive study to demonstrate increased mortality risk in Asian patients with BP.
      • Mortality risk factors include Parkinson disease, heart failure and chronic renal disease.
      • Combination treatment with low-to-moderate-dose corticosteroids and immunomodulatory agents, such as doxycycline and/or nicotinamide, was associated with lower mortality.
    10. Factors associated with sun protection compliance: results from a nationwide cross-sectional evaluation of 2215 patients from a dermatological consultation (pages 1327–1335)

      U. Sattler, S. Thellier, V. Sibaud, C. Taïeb, S. Mery, C. Paul and N. Meyer

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12966

      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Campaigns designed to promote sun protection often fail to induce long-term changes in behaviour.
      • There is limited information on patients with low compliance to sun protection recommendations by dermatologists.

      What does this study add?

      • This study identifies factors associated with low adherence to sun protection behaviour in dermatology patients receiving a sunscreen prescription.
      • These factors are age below 20 years or over 64 years, male sex, and lower knowledge about accurate sun protection recommendations and ultraviolet-associated risks.
    11. Photobiology

      You have free access to this content
      Nonablative fractional laser as a tool to facilitate skin penetration of 5-aminolaevulinic acid with minimal skin disruption: a preliminary study (pages 1336–1340)

      H.K. Lim, K.H. Jeong, N.I. Kim and M.K. Shin

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12817

      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Ablative fractional lasers can create microthermal channels that facilitate penetration of photosensitizers.
      • Nonablative fractional lasers have minimal side-effects compared with ablative lasers.

      What does this study add?

      • This study demonstrated that nonablative fractional lasers can be used as a pretreatment to enhance skin penetration of 5-aminolaevulinic acid in photodynamic therapy.
    12. Therapeutics

      Clinical and immunological outcomes of high- and low-dose rituximab treatments in patients with pemphigus: a randomized, comparative, observer-blinded study (pages 1341–1349)

      A.J. Kanwar, K. Vinay, G.U. Sawatkar, S. Dogra, R.W. Minz, N.H. Shear, H. Koga, N. Ishii and T. Hashimoto

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12972

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • There is no agreement on the optimum dose of rituximab to be used in treating patients with pemphigus.
      • A single study has reported low-dose rituximab (2 × 500 mg) to be effective in patients with pemphigus.

      What does this study add?

      • A few clinical (relapse rate, adjuvant requirement) and immunological (fall in desmoglein indices, CD19 cell repopulation) outcomes suggest improved outcomes in patients with pemphigus receiving 2 × 1000 mg rituximab compared with a dose of 2 × 500 mg.
    13. Concise communications

      Treatment of port wine stains with pulsed dye laser and topical timolol: a multicenter randomized controlled trial (pages 1350–1353)

      T. Passeron, A. Maza, E. Fontas, G. Toubel, P. Vabres, C. Livideanu, J.-M. Mazer, B. Rossi, F. Boukari, Y. Harmelin, I. Dreyfus, J. Mazereeuw-Hautier and J.-P. Lacour

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12772

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Neoangiogenesis occurs within days following laser treatment of port wine stains (PWS).
      • The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors has been shown to be increased in PWS lesions, and to play a key role in neoangiogenesis.
      • By acting on VEGF, timolol gel might be useful for preventing post-laser angiogenesis.

      What does this study add?

      • Topical use of twice daily applications of timolol gel showed good tolerance, but failed to significantly improve the efficacy of pulsed dye laser treatment of PWS.
    14. Combination chemotherapy for metastatic extramammary Paget disease (pages 1354–1357)

      K. Oashi, A. Tsutsumida, K. Namikawa, R. Tanaka, W. Omata, Y. Yamamoto and N. Yamazaki

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12788

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Because of the rarity of extramammary Paget disease (EMPD), the medical literature available to guide management of this disease is limited, particularly in patients with metastases.
      • No effective treatment for metastatic EMPD has been established.

      What does this study add?

      • The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of using combination chemotherapy (FECOM) in patients with metastatic EMPD at the National Cancer Center Hospital in Japan during the past 15 years.
      • The combination chemotherapy FECOM may be a treatment option for patients with metastatic EMPD who have enough bone marrow, liver and renal function to tolerate cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents.
    15. Histopathological correlates of basal cell carcinoma in the slice and en face imaging modes of high-definition optical coherence tomography (pages 1358–1361)

      T. Gambichler, I. Plura, P. Kampilafkos, K. Valavanis, M. Sand, F.G. Bechara and M. Stücker

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12797

      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • High-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) scanners have recently been developed, providing significantly higher resolution than conventional OCT, and thus likely have better performance in skin cancer diagnostics.

      What does this study add?

      • We have demonstrated that HD-OCT using both the slice and en face imaging modes can visualize histopathological correlates of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and potentially aid noninvasive diagnostics.
      • It was not possible to predict the superficial or solid BCC subtypes using HD-OCT correlation.
      • For the first time we have shown that peripheral rimming in HD-OCT correlates with peritumoral mucin deposition.
    16. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Heterozygous frameshift mutation in keratin 5 in a family with Galli–Galli disease (pages 1362–1365)

      A.K. Reisenauer, S.V. Wordingham, J. York, E.W.J. Kokkonen, W.H.I. Mclean, N.J. Wilson and F.J.D. Smith

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12813

      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • Mutations in keratin 5 have been identified as an underlying cause of Galli–Galli disease (GGD).

      What does this study add?

      • Identification of a previously unreported frameshift mutation in keratin 5 resulting in a premature stop codon provides further evidence that GGD is caused by haploinsufficiency of keratin 5.
    17. The current and future role of general practitioners in skin cancer care: an assessment of 268 general practitioners (pages 1366–1368)

      M.C.J. van Rijsingen, B. van Bon, G.J. van der Wilt, A.L.M. Lagro-Janssen and M.J.P. Gerritsen

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12935

      What's already known about this topic?

      • From previous studies it is known that general practitioners have difficulty diagnosing skin cancer, and additional skin cancer training is recommended.
      • General practitioners' vision on their role in skin cancer has not been assessed.

      What does this study add?

      • General practitioners could contribute to treatment of actinic keratoses and low-risk basal cell carcinomas, and skin cancer prevention.
      • Many general practitioners are willing to extend their role in skin cancer care; however, additional training has been requested.
  8. Case report

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Cutaneous biology
    8. Original articles
    9. Case report
    10. Correspondence
    11. Corrigendum
    12. Errata
    13. News and Notices
    14. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    15. Abstracts
    16. Plain language summaries
    1. Access and surgical approach to the isolated intranasal basal cell carcinoma (pages 1369–1372)

      D.C. Ponsky, A.R. Schmitt, D.W. Stepnick and J.S. Bordeaux

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12775

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      What's already known about this topic?

      • The primary intranasal basal cell carcinoma is a rare tumour that presents a unique therapeutic challenge.
      • The alarotomy technique may be utilized to gain access to intranasal lesions, but has not yet been discussed in the dermatological literature.

      What does this study add?

      • This study presents the alarotomy technique as a viable option for surgical treatment of primary intranasal tumours.
      • The two cases discussed here illustrate that the alarotomy results in excellent cosmetic and functional outcome.
  9. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Cutaneous biology
    8. Original articles
    9. Case report
    10. Correspondence
    11. Corrigendum
    12. Errata
    13. News and Notices
    14. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    15. Abstracts
    16. Plain language summaries
    1. Our experience of glycopyrrolate 2% cream for axillary hyperhidrosis (page 1373)

      D.R. Hale, A.I. MacKenzie and G.M. Kavanagh

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12857

    2. Acute iododerma secondary to iodinated contrast media (pages 1377–1379)

      A.L. Young and M.E. Grossman

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12852

      • image
      • image
    3. Vitamin D status in hidradenitis suppurativa (pages 1379–1380)

      G. Kelly, C.M. Sweeney, R. Fitzgerald, M.P. O'Keane, M. Kilbane, A. Lally, A.M. Tobin, M.J. McKenna and B. Kirby

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12900

    4. Individuals with complete filaggrin deficiency may have an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma (pages 1380–1381)

      J. Kaae, P.B. Szecsi, M. Meldgaard, M.L.M. Espersen, S. Stender, J.D. Johansen, J. Bandier, J.P. Thyssen, T. Menné, S.L. Nielsen, E. Høgdall, E. Balslev and L. Skov

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.12911

  10. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Cutaneous biology
    8. Original articles
    9. Case report
    10. Correspondence
    11. Corrigendum
    12. Errata
    13. News and Notices
    14. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    15. Abstracts
    16. Plain language summaries
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum (page 1382)

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.13032

      This article corrects:

      Concerns regarding BRAF testing algorithm

      Vol. 169, Issue 5, 1167–1168, Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2013

  11. Errata

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Cutaneous biology
    8. Original articles
    9. Case report
    10. Correspondence
    11. Corrigendum
    12. Errata
    13. News and Notices
    14. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    15. Abstracts
    16. Plain language summaries
    1. You have free access to this content
      Errata (page 1382)

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.13140

      This article corrects:

      Satisfaction of treatment with biologics is high in psoriasis: results from the Bio-CAPTURE network3

      Vol. 170, Issue 5, 1158–1165, Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014

    2. You have free access to this content
      Errata (page 1382)

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.13179

      This article corrects:

      What's in a disease name?

      Vol. 170, Issue 5, 1005–1007, Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014

    3. You have free access to this content
  12. News and Notices

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Cutaneous biology
    8. Original articles
    9. Case report
    10. Correspondence
    11. Corrigendum
    12. Errata
    13. News and Notices
    14. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    15. Abstracts
    16. Plain language summaries
    1. News and Notices (page 1383)

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.13127

  13. Reviewer Acknowledgement

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Cutaneous biology
    8. Original articles
    9. Case report
    10. Correspondence
    11. Corrigendum
    12. Errata
    13. News and Notices
    14. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    15. Abstracts
    16. Plain language summaries
    1. BJD Reviewers 2013 (pages 1384–1391)

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.13082

  14. Abstracts

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Cutaneous biology
    8. Original articles
    9. Case report
    10. Correspondence
    11. Corrigendum
    12. Errata
    13. News and Notices
    14. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    15. Abstracts
    16. Plain language summaries
  15. Plain language summaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Editor's Choice
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentaries
    5. Review articles
    6. Systematic review
    7. Cutaneous biology
    8. Original articles
    9. Case report
    10. Correspondence
    11. Corrigendum
    12. Errata
    13. News and Notices
    14. Reviewer Acknowledgement
    15. Abstracts
    16. Plain language summaries
    1. You have free access to this content
      Plain Language Summaries (pages e56–e61)

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/bjd.13086

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION