Predicting risk severity and response of fetal neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia

Authors

  • Ophira Salomon,

    Corresponding author
    • Amalia Biron Research Institute of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
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  • Nurit Rosenberg

    1. Amalia Biron Research Institute of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
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Correspondence: Professor Ophira Salomon, The Amalia Biron Research Institute of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Sheba Medical Centre, Tel-Hashomer 52621, Israel.

E-mail: ophiras@sheba.health.gov.il

Summary

Fetal neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a devastating bleeding disorder in the fetus or neonate caused by transplacental transport of maternal alloantibodies to paternal-derived antigen on fetal platelets. In Caucasians, up to 80% of FNAIT cases result from maternal immunization to human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a. New methods have developed facilitating detection of common and private antibodies against HPAs triggering FNAIT. Understanding the pathogenesis of FNAIT made it possible to develop a novel strategy to treat this disorder. To date, recombinant monoclonal antibodies directed against the β3 integrin and Fc receptors have been tested in a mouse model of FNAIT, and seem to be promising. Whether those novel treatments will eventually replace the conventional high dose immunoglobulin G in women with FNAIT is yet unknown.

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