Improved population level survival in younger Hodgkin lymphoma patients in Germany in the early 21st century

Authors

  • Dianne Pulte,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg, Germany
    2. Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA
    • Correspondence: Dianne Pulte, Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, 1015 Chestnut Street Suite 1321, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.

      E-mail: pultedi@gmail.com

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  • Lina Jansen,

    1. Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg, Germany
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  • Adam Gondos,

    1. Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg, Germany
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  • Katharina Emrich ,

    1. Cancer Registry of Rhineland-Palatinate Institute for Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, University Medical Centre, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany
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  • Bernd Holleczek,

    1. Saarland Cancer Registry, Saarbrücken, Germany
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  • Alexander Katalinic,

    1. Cancer Registry of Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, Germany
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  • Hermann Brenner,

    1. Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg, Germany
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  • the GEKID Cancer Survival Working Group


Summary

Treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is more aggressive in Germany than in the United States (US) and differences in treatment may lead to differences in population level survival. Patients diagnosed with HL in 11 German states in 1997–2006 were included in the analyses and were compared to similar analyses from patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database in the US. Period analysis was used to calculate 5-year relative survival for the time period of 2002–2006 overall and by gender, age and histology. Overall 5-year relative survival for patients with HL in Germany was 84·3%, compared to 80·6% for the US. Survival was highest in patients aged 15–29 years at 97·9% and decreased with age to 57·5% at age 60 +  Survival for men and women, respectively, was 84·7% and 84·1% in Germany and 78·2% and 83·6% in the US. 5-year relative survival for patients diagnosed with HL in Germany was close to 100% for younger patients. Survival of HL patients in the US was lower than in Germany overall, but was comparable in older patients and in women. Population-based studies with longer follow-up are still needed to examine effects of late toxicity on long term survival.

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