Biology of the Cell

Cover image for Vol. 104 Issue 1

January 2012

Volume 104, Issue 1

Pages 1–47

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/boc.201190001

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Research Articles
    1. Masthead

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/boc.201190002

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Contents: Biology of the Cell. 1/2012 (pages 1–2)

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/boc.201190003

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      MicroRNAs: critical regulators of epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT) and mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) in cancer progression (pages 3–12)

      Marc D. Bullock, Abdulkadir E. Sayan, Graham K. Packham and Alex H. Mirnezami

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/boc.201100115

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Small highly conserved non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate the expression of a wide range of genes involved in tumourogenesis and metastasis. Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and the reverse process Mesenchymal to Epithelial Transition (MET) are key events in the metastatic cascade suggesting that plasticity is a prerequisite for cancer cells capable of completing the metastatic journey. Here we demonstrate that miRNAs are crucial regulators of EMT and that their pleotropic actions during EMT and MET have important consequences for cancer progression.

  5. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Research Articles
    1. Intracellular trafficking of RNASET2, a novel component of P-bodies (pages 13–21)

      Laura Vidalino, Laura Monti, Albrecht Haase, Albertomaria Moro, Francesco Acquati, Roberto Taramelli and Paolo Macchi

      Article first published online: 1 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/boc.201100092

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this study we analysed the intracellular trafficking of RNASET2, a novel member of the RNase family. RNASET2 localizes to the Golgi apparatus, transported to the plasma membrane via COPI and II-associated vesicles and then secreted in the extracellular environment. Under stress conditions, RNASET2 is also targeted to P-bodies but it remains excluded from stress granules. Cells lacking RNASET2 show a significant reduction in the number of P-bodies, suggesting possible involvement of RNASET2 in their formation in mammalian cells.

    2. The oncogenic TBC domain protein USP6/TRE17 regulates cell migration and cytokinesis (pages 22–33)

      Christine Rueckert and Volker Haucke

      Article first published online: 1 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/boc.201100108

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The TBC domain protein USP6 is genetically linked to human cancer. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to USP6-mediated cellular transformation. It is shown that manipulation of USP6 expression levels has an impact on cell migration as well as on cell proliferation and cytokinesis, processes that play a key role in cancer cell invasion. These effects involve the Arf6/ ACAP1 pathway. The combined data suggest a model according to which USP6 may act as a molecular linker between cell migration and cytokinesis.

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      Construction of a Plasmodium falciparum Rab-interactome identifies CK1 and PKA as Rab-effector kinases in malaria parasites (pages 34–47)

      Fathia Ben Rached, Carinne Ndjembo-Ezougou, Syama Chandran, Hana Talabani, Hélène Yera, Vrushali Dandavate, Pierre Bourdoncle, Markus Meissner, Utpal Tatu and Gordon Langsley

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/boc.201100081

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rabs are important regulators of vesicular traffic via their recruitment of specific effectors. To identify Rab effectors for the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum we made a yeast Ypt-interactome and exploited this to build a parasite Rab-interactome. The kinase PfCK1 was shown to be a specific PfRab5B effector, whereas the catalytic subunit of PfPKA-C an effector of both PfRab5A and PfRab7. The recruitment of PfPKA to PfRab5A+ and PfRab7+ vesicles suggests that the cAMP-dependent kinase potentially plays a role in early and late endosome function in malaria parasites.

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