Biology of the Cell

Cover image for Vol. 104 Issue 5

May 2012

Volume 104, Issue 5

Pages 257–305

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Research Articles
    6. Scientiae forum
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      Cover Picture

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/boc.201290014

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Research Articles
    6. Scientiae forum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Contents: Biology of the Cell. 5/2012 (pages 257–258)

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/boc.201290015

  3. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Research Articles
    6. Scientiae forum
    1. You have free access to this content
      The unfolded protein response at the crossroads of cellular life and death during endoplasmic reticulum stress (pages 259–270)

      Richard Jäger, Mathieu J.M. Bertrand, Adrienne M. Gorman, Peter Vandenabeele and Afshin Samali

      Article first published online: 29 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/boc.201100055

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Accumulating unfolded proteins inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) trigger the unfolded protein response (UPR) by activating three ER transmembrane proteins: PERK, ATF6, IRE1. Intriguingly, these ER stress receptors have dual functions: they can initiate adaptive responses (blue arrows) aimed at maintaining cell viability. However, the same receptors can also activate pathways leading to cell death (red arrows). This review describes the components of the two responses and summarises our current understanding of how cells switch between them.

  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Research Articles
    6. Scientiae forum
    1. A role for microtubules in endothelial cell protrusion in three-dimensional matrices (pages 271–286)

      Gabriel G. Martins and John Kolega

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/boc.201100088

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      MT depolymerisation prevents cell spreading in 3D collagen matrices in a Rho-dependent manner. This is particularly disruptive when cells protrude and migrate in pliable 3D matrices (and less on 2D rigid substrata), suggesting a role for MTs and the Rho pathway in the fine-tuning of contractile and adhesive forces necessary to sustain cell motility in vivo.

    2. The transcriptional activity of co-activator AIB1 is regulated by the SUMO E3 Ligase PIAS1 (pages 287–296)

      Shujing Li, Chunhua Yang, Yongde Hong, Hailian Bi, Feng Zhao, Ying Liu, Xiang Ao, Pengsha Pang, Xinrong Xing, Alan K. Chang, Liyun Xiao, Yuanyuan Zhang and Huijian Wu

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/boc.201100116

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Regulation of AIB1 transcriptional activity. (A) In the presence of estrogen (E2), estrogen receptor (ER) binds to the promoter of its downstream target genes, followed by the recruitment of AIB1 as well as other transcriptional co-activators (CoA) to promote the transcription of these genes. (B) PIAS1 functions as the SUMO (S) E3 ligase that increases the SUMOylation of AIB1 and attenuates its interaction with ER, resulting in the repression of ER transactivation activity.

  5. Scientiae forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Research Articles
    6. Scientiae forum
    1. The dynamic cytoskeleton of the developing male germ cell (pages 297–305)

      Ann O. Sperry

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/boc.201100102

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mammalian spermatogenesis entails a truly dramatic reorganisation of the germ cell cytoskeleton in order to successfully transform a precursor cell into a highly polarised spermatozoon. During this developmental pathway, the microtubule cytoskeleton rearranges to form the mitotic and meiotic spindles followed by formation of the manchette and flagellum. This review highlights the role and regulation of microtubule and actin-based structures during male germ cell development.

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