Lysophospholipid receptor nomenclature review: IUPHAR Review 8

Authors

  • Yasuyuki Kihara,

    1. Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience Department, Dorris Neuroscience Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA
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  • Michael Maceyka,

    1. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Massey Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA
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  • Sarah Spiegel,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Massey Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA
    • Correspondence

      Sarah Spiegel, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Massey Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, 1101 E. Marshall Street, Richmond, VA 23298, USA. E-mail: sspiegel@vcu.edu; Jerold Chun, Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience Department, Dorris Neuroscience Center, The Scripps Research Institute, DNC-118, 10550 N. Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. E-mail: jchun@scripps.edu

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  • Jerold Chun

    Corresponding author
    1. Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience Department, Dorris Neuroscience Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA
    • Correspondence

      Sarah Spiegel, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Massey Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, 1101 E. Marshall Street, Richmond, VA 23298, USA. E-mail: sspiegel@vcu.edu; Jerold Chun, Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience Department, Dorris Neuroscience Center, The Scripps Research Institute, DNC-118, 10550 N. Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. E-mail: jchun@scripps.edu

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Abstract

Lysophospholipids encompass a diverse range of small, membrane-derived phospholipids that act as extracellular signals. The signalling properties are mediated by 7-transmembrane GPCRs, constituent members of which have continued to be identified after their initial discovery in the mid-1990s. Here we briefly review this class of receptors, with a particular emphasis on their protein and gene nomenclatures that reflect their cognate ligands. There are six lysophospholipid receptors that interact with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA): protein names LPA1 – LPA6 and italicized gene names LPAR1-LPAR6 (human) and Lpar1-Lpar6 (non-human). There are five sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptors: protein names S1P1-S1P5 and italicized gene names S1PR1-S1PR5 (human) and S1pr1-S1pr5 (non-human). Recent additions to the lysophospholipid receptor family have resulted in the proposed names for a lysophosphatidyl inositol (LPI) receptor – protein name LPI1 and gene name LPIR1 (human) and Lpir1 (non-human) – and three lysophosphatidyl serine receptors – protein names LyPS1, LyPS2, LyPS3 and gene names LYPSR1-LYPSR3 (human) and Lypsr1-Lypsr3 (non-human) along with a variant form that does not appear to exist in humans that is provisionally named LyPS2L. This nomenclature incorporates previous recommendations from the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology, the Human Genome Organization, the Gene Nomenclature Committee, and the Mouse Genome Informatix.

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