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Brain and Behavior

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 1

September 2011

Volume 1, Issue 1

Pages 0–61, i–i

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Original Research
    5. Reviews
    6. Commentaries
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Issue Information (page 0)

      Article first published online: 29 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.18

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Original Research
    5. Reviews
    6. Commentaries
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Publishing in an open access age: preserving the scribbles, getting heard, and assuring the quality of information (page i)

      Andrei V. Alexandrov

      Article first published online: 22 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.5

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      With the launch of this open access, multidisciplinary journal, we offer a broad scientific community a forum for rapid publication of original contributions, covering all aspects of neurology, neuroscience, psychology, and psychiatry. By offering quality assurance through stringent peer review and delivering content quickly, broadly, and effectively, we aim for Brain and Behavior to become both your regular source for neurology, neuroscience, psychology and psychiatry research, as well as a platform by which you will offer your best science to the broadest community possible.

  3. Original Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Original Research
    5. Reviews
    6. Commentaries
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Neural bases of gaze and emotion processing in children with autism spectrum disorders (pages 1–11)

      Mari S. Davies, Mirella Dapretto, Marian Sigman, Leigh Sepeta and Susan Y. Bookheimer

      Article first published online: 8 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.6

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      Abnormal eye contact is a core symptom of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), though little is understood of the neural bases of gaze processing in ASD. Competing hypotheses suggest that individuals with ASD avoid eye contact due to the anxiety-provoking nature of direct eye gaze or that eye-gaze cues hold less interest or significance to children with ASD. The current study examined the effects of gaze direction on neural processing of emotional faces in typically developing (TD) children and those with ASD.

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      Comparison of weight changes following unilateral and staged bilateral STN DBS for advanced PD (pages 12–18)

      Eric M. Lee, Ashish Kurundkar, Gary R. Cutter, He Huang, Barton L. Guthrie, Ray L. Watts and Harrison C. Walker

      Article first published online: 20 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.9

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      Unilateral and bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) result in weight gain in the initial postoperative months, but little is known about the changes in weight following unilateral and staged bilateral STN DBS over longer time intervals. A case–control comparison evaluated weight changes over 2 years in 43 consecutive unilateral STN DBS patients, among whom 25 elected to undergo staged bilateral STN DBS, and 21 age-matched and disease severity matched PD controls without DBS. Regression analyses incorporating age, gender, and baseline weight in case or control were conducted to assess weight changes 2 years after the initial unilateral surgery.

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      Gaze and viewing angle influence visual stabilization of upright posture (pages 19–25)

      K.I. Ustinova and J. Perkins

      Article first published online: 5 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.10

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      Focusing gaze on a target helps stabilize upright posture. We investigated how this visual stabilization can be affected by observing a target presented under different gaze and viewing angles. In a series of 10-second trials, participants (N= 20, 29.3 ± 9 years of age) stood on a force plate and fixed their gaze on a figure presented on a screen at a distance of 1 m. Results suggest that both the gaze angle and viewing perspective may be essential variables of the visuomotor system modulating postural responses.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A cytokine mixture of GM-CSF and IL-3 that induces a neuroprotective phenotype of microglia leading to amelioration of (6-OHDA)-induced Parkinsonism of rats (pages 26–43)

      Mohammed Emamussalehin Choudhury, Kana Sugimoto, Madoka Kubo, Masahiro Nagai, Masahiro Nomoto, Hisaaki Takahashi, Hajime Yano and Junya Tanaka

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.11

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      Dopamine (DA) agonists are widely used as primary treatments for Parkinson's disease. However, they do not prevent progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, the central pathology of the disease. In this study, we found that subcutaneous injection of a cytokine mixture containing granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-3 (IL-3) markedly suppressed dopaminergic neurodegeneration in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats, an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

  4. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Original Research
    5. Reviews
    6. Commentaries
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Epidemic of illicit drug use, mechanisms of action/addiction and stroke as a health hazard (pages 44–54)

      Katherine Esse, Marco Fossati-Bellani, Angela Traylor and Sheryl Martin-Schild

      Article first published online: 8 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.7

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      Many illicit drugs have been linked to major cardiovascular events and other comorbidities, including cocaine, amphetamines, ecstasy, heroin, phencyclidine, lysergic acid diethylamide, and marijuana. This review focuses on available epidemiological data, mechanisms of action, particularly those leading to cerebrovascular events, and it is based on papers published in English in PubMed during 1950 through February 2011.

  5. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Original Research
    5. Reviews
    6. Commentaries
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Eye-of-the-Tiger sign is not Pathognomonic of Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration in Adult Cases (pages 55–56)

      Chaw-Liang Chang and Chih-Ming Lin

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.8

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      An eye-of-the-tiger sign is previously known to have one-to-one correlation with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). Reviewing the literature on this subject, the correlation between eye-of-the-tiger sign and PKAN seems to show an interesting hypothesis that differs from conventional conclusion. We analyze the published papers in an attempt to reflect this trend and illustrate our points with findings in a 39-year-old man.

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      Challenges in diagnosis of isolated central nervous system vasculitis (pages 57–61)

      Amy W. Amara, Khurram Bashir, Cheryl A. Palmer and Harrison C. Walker

      Article first published online: 25 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.12

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      Isolated central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis is a rare and complicated disorder. Imaging, serologic, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) evaluation, and even angiography can fail to establish the diagnosis. Often, brain biopsy is required. In order to illustrate these challenges, we report the case of a patient who presented with subacute cognitive decline and was ultimately diagnosed with isolated CNS eosinophilic vasculitis.

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