Invertebrates, ecosystem services and climate change

Authors

  • Chelse M. Prather,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA
    2. Luquillo LTER, Río Grande, Puerto Rico, PR, USA
    • Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, USA
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  • Shannon L. Pelini,

    1. Harvard Forest (HF LTER), Harvard University, Petersham, MA, USA
    2. Department of Biological Sciences, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH, USA
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    • Authors contributed equally.

  • Angela Laws,

    1. Division of Biology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA
    2. Konza Prairie LTER, Manhattan, KS, USA
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    • Authors contributed equally.

  • Emily Rivest,

    1. Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, USA
    2. Moorea Coral Reef LTER, Marine Science Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, USA
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  • Megan Woltz,

    1. Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
    2. W. K. Kellogg Biological Station LTER, Hickory Corners, MI, USA
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  • Christopher P. Bloch,

    1. Luquillo LTER, Río Grande, Puerto Rico, PR, USA
    2. Department of Biological Sciences, Bridgewater State University, Bridgewater, MA, USA
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  • Israel Del Toro,

    1. Harvard Forest (HF LTER), Harvard University, Petersham, MA, USA
    2. Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA
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  • Chuan-Kai Ho,

    1. Institute of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, National Taiwan University, Taiwan
    2. Georgia Coastal Ecosystems LTER, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA
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  • John Kominoski,

    1. Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, FL, USA
    2. Odum School of Ecology & Coweeta LTER, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA
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  • T. A. Scott Newbold,

    1. Department of Life Sciences, Sheridan College, Sheridan, WY, USA
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  • Sheena Parsons,

    1. Division of Biology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA
    2. Konza Prairie LTER, Manhattan, KS, USA
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  • A. Joern

    1. Division of Biology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA
    2. Konza Prairie LTER, Manhattan, KS, USA
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Address for correspondence (Tel: (859) 466–4044; Fax: (713) 743–2636; E-mail: chelse.prather@gmail.com).

ABSTRACT

The sustainability of ecosystem services depends on a firm understanding of both how organisms provide these services to humans and how these organisms will be altered with a changing climate. Unquestionably a dominant feature of most ecosystems, invertebrates affect many ecosystem services and are also highly responsive to climate change. However, there is still a basic lack of understanding of the direct and indirect paths by which invertebrates influence ecosystem services, as well as how climate change will affect those ecosystem services by altering invertebrate populations. This indicates a lack of communication and collaboration among scientists researching ecosystem services and climate change effects on invertebrates, and land managers and researchers from other disciplines, which becomes obvious when systematically reviewing the literature relevant to invertebrates, ecosystem services, and climate change. To address this issue, we review how invertebrates respond to climate change. We then review how invertebrates both positively and negatively influence ecosystem services. Lastly, we provide some critical future directions for research needs, and suggest ways in which managers, scientists and other researchers may collaborate to tackle the complex issue of sustaining invertebrate-mediated services under a changing climate.

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