Investigating changes in use of services by high-need families following the Helping Families Programme, an innovative parenting intervention for children with severe and persistent conduct problems

Authors

  • Madeleine Stevens,

    1. Personal Social Services Research Unit, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK
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  • Lucy Harris,

    1. Centre for Parent and Child Support, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service Research Unit, Kings College, Institute of Psychiatry, Michael Rutter Centre, London, UK
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  • Megan Ellis,

    1. Centre for Parent and Child Support, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service Research Unit, Kings College, Institute of Psychiatry, Michael Rutter Centre, London, UK
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  • Crispin Day,

    1. Centre for Parent and Child Support, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service Research Unit, Kings College, Institute of Psychiatry, Michael Rutter Centre, London, UK
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  • Jennifer Beecham

    1. Personal Social Services Research Unit, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK
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Abstract

Background

Interventions aimed at high-need families have difficulty demonstrating short-term impact on child behaviour. Measuring impact on use of services could provide short-term indication of longer term benefits.

Method

During a feasibility pilot study we collected data on service use and attitudes to services from a small sample of parents from high-need families, before and after receiving the Helping Families Programme.

Results

Respondents provided a range of opinions on a variety of social and community services received.

Conclusions

The study demonstrates the potential of short-term changes in enhanced service use data for building hypotheses of longer term change.

Ancillary