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Associations Between Child Disabilities and Caregiver Discipline and Violence in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

Authors

  • Charlene Hendricks,

    Corresponding author
    1. National Institutes of Health
    • Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Charlene Hendricks or Marc H. Bornstein, Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Suite 8030 6705, Rockledge Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892-7971. Electronic mail may be sent to marc_h_bornstein@nih.gov.

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  • Jennifer E. Lansford,

    1. Duke University
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  • Kirby Deater-Deckard,

    1. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
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  • Marc H. Bornstein

    Corresponding author
    1. National Institutes of Health
    • Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Charlene Hendricks or Marc H. Bornstein, Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Suite 8030 6705, Rockledge Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892-7971. Electronic mail may be sent to marc_h_bornstein@nih.gov.

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  • This research was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH, NICHD.

Abstract

Using nationally representative samples of 45,964 two- to nine-year-old children and their primary caregivers in 17 developing countries, this study examined the relations between children's cognitive, language, sensory, and motor disabilities and caregivers' use of discipline and violence. Primary caregivers reported on their child's disabilities and whether they or anyone in their household had used nonviolent discipline, psychological aggression, and physical violence toward the target child and believed that using corporal punishment is necessary. Logistic regression analyses supported the hypothesis that children with disabilities are treated more harshly than children without disabilities. The findings suggest that policies and interventions are needed to work toward the United Nations' goals of ensuring that children with disabilities are protected from abuse and violence.

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