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Clinical & Experimental Allergy

Cytokine responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to allergen do not identify asthma or asthma phenotypes

Authors

  • E. Simms,

    1. Divisions of Clinical Immunology & Allergy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
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  • M. Kjarsgaard,

    1. Respirology, Department of Medicine, McMaster University & St Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, ON, Canada
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  • S. Denis,

    1. Respirology, Department of Medicine, McMaster University & St Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, ON, Canada
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    • F. E. Hargreave—Deceased.

  • F. E. Hargreave,

    1. Respirology, Department of Medicine, McMaster University & St Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, ON, Canada
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    • F. E. Hargreave—Deceased.

  • P. Nair,

    1. Respirology, Department of Medicine, McMaster University & St Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, ON, Canada
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    • Drs Nair and Larché contributed equally to this study.

  • M. Larché

    Corresponding author
    1. Divisions of Clinical Immunology & Allergy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
    2. Respirology, Department of Medicine, McMaster University & St Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, ON, Canada
    • Correspondence:

      Dr M. Larché, Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health, St Joseph's Healthcare, 50 Charlton Avenue East, Hamilton, ON L8N 4A6, Canada.

      E-mail: larche@mcmaster.ca

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    • Drs Nair and Larché contributed equally to this study.


Summary

Background

Asthmatic patients are often differentiated based on their atopic status (atopic or nonatopic) and type of bronchitis (eosinophilic, neutrophilic, both, or neither). There is evidence supporting a central role for the T cell in asthma, but the role of allergen-induced T cell cytokines in driving disease in different asthma phenotypes remains unclear.

Objective

To investigate the hypothesis that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from asthma patients with different phenotypes would react characteristically to a panel of common aeroallergens.

Methods

We incubated PBMCs from 41 asthma patients and 8 healthy controls with allergen and assessed PBMC proliferation by 3H-thymidine incorporation and the production of the cytokines IL-5, IL-17A, IL-23, IL-10, and IFN-γ by ELISA.

Results

No differences in PBMC proliferation or cytokine production were found in patients with asthma, compared with healthy controls, or between patients with different asthma phenotypes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Peripheral blood mononuclear cell cytokine responses to allergen are not able to assist in the discrimination between disease state, atopic status, or type of bronchitis in asthma.

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