Get access
Clinical & Experimental Allergy

Multivalent paediatric allergy vaccines protect against allergic anaphylaxis in mice

Authors

  • Y. Waeckerle-Men,

    1. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author
    • These two authors contributed equally to this work.
  • Y. Liang,

    1. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Dermatology, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China and
    2. Division of Nephrology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author
    • These two authors contributed equally to this work.
  • S. von Moos,

    1. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Dermatology, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China and
    2. Division of Nephrology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • T. M. Kündig,

    1. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • P. Johansen

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    • Correspondence:

      Pål Johansen, Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zurich, Gloriastrasse 31, CH-8091 Zurich, Switzerland.

      E-mail: Pal.Johansen@usz.ch

    Search for more papers by this author

Summary

Background

Almost a quarter of the world population suffers from IgE-mediated allergies. T cells and IgG-producing B cells can produce protection, but treatment for disease is laborious with unsatisfactory patient compliance.

Objective

We sought to identify whether paediatric allergy vaccines affected later allergen sensitization and onset of disease when used prophylactically.

Methods

A murine model of anaphylaxis was applied. Mice were first immunized with monovalent or multivalent allergy vaccines that also contained aluminium hydroxide and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide as adjuvants. Later, the mice were sensitized by multiple low-dose injections of aluminium-adsorbed allergen. After a dormant period, the mice were challenged systemically with high-dose allergen, and the clinical signs of anaphylaxis were recorded. Throughout the immunization and sensitization periods, blood was collected for serological testing.

Results

Immunization with allergy vaccines produced antigen-specific protection against sensitization as measured by systemic anaphylaxis in mice. The long-term effect was observed both after juvenile (5–6 weeks) and neonatal (7 days) vaccination. Monovalent and pentavalent vaccines were protective to a similar level. Protection was associated with increased secretion of IgG2a and production of IFN-γ. Protection could also be transferred to sensitized mice via serum or via CD25-positive CD4 T cells.

Conclusion and clinical relevance

Prophylactic and multivalent allergy vaccines in juvenile and neonatal mice protected against later sensitization and anaphylaxis. Such treatment may provide a rational measure for future management of allergen-related diseases and their strong socio-economic impact on daily life.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary