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Stimulated human melanocytes express and release interleukin-8, which is inhibited by luteolin: relevance to early vitiligo

Authors

  • A. Miniati,

    1. Molecular Immunopharmacology and Drug Discovery Laboratory, Department of Molecular Physiology and Pharmacology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
    2. First Department of Dermatology, A. Sygros Hospital, Athens University Medical School, Athens, Greece
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  • Z. Weng,

    1. Molecular Immunopharmacology and Drug Discovery Laboratory, Department of Molecular Physiology and Pharmacology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
    2. Graduate Program in Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA
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  • B. Zhang,

    1. Molecular Immunopharmacology and Drug Discovery Laboratory, Department of Molecular Physiology and Pharmacology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
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  • A. Therianou,

    1. Molecular Immunopharmacology and Drug Discovery Laboratory, Department of Molecular Physiology and Pharmacology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
    2. First Department of Dermatology, A. Sygros Hospital, Athens University Medical School, Athens, Greece
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  • M. Vasiadi,

    1. Molecular Immunopharmacology and Drug Discovery Laboratory, Department of Molecular Physiology and Pharmacology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
    2. Graduate Program in Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA
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  • E. Nicolaidou,

    1. First Department of Dermatology, A. Sygros Hospital, Athens University Medical School, Athens, Greece
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  • A. J. Stratigos,

    1. First Department of Dermatology, A. Sygros Hospital, Athens University Medical School, Athens, Greece
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  • C. Antoniou,

    1. First Department of Dermatology, A. Sygros Hospital, Athens University Medical School, Athens, Greece
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  • T. C. Theoharides

    Corresponding author
    1. Molecular Immunopharmacology and Drug Discovery Laboratory, Department of Molecular Physiology and Pharmacology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
    2. Graduate Program in Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA
    3. Departments of Biochemistry , Tufts University School of Medicine and Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA
    4. Department of Internal Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine and Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA
    • Correspondence: Dr Theoharis C. Theoharides, Department of Molecular Physiology and Pharmacology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Suite J-304, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02111, USA

      E-mail: theoharis.theoharides@tufts.edu

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  • Conflict of interest: none declared.

Summary

Vitiligo is a disorder of depigmentation, for which the pathogenesis is as yet unclear. Interleukin (IL)-8 (CXCL8) is a key inflammatory chemokine. We investigated the regulation of IL-8 production in human melanocytes, and the IL-8 serum levels and skin gene expression in patients with vitiligo and in controls. Cultured melanocytes were stimulated for 24 h with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) 100 ng/mL and IL-1β 10 ng/mL, with or without pretreatment with luteolin 50 μmol/L for 30 min, and IL-8 release was measured by ELISA. Serum cytokines were measured by a microbead array. Skin biopsies were taken from healthy subjects (n = 14) as well as from marginal lesional and nonlesional skin from patients with vitiligo (n = 15). IL-8 gene expression was evaluated by quantitative real time PCR. Both TNF and IL-1β stimulated significant IL-8 release (< 0.01) from melanocytes, whereas pretreatment with luteolin significantly inhibited this effect (< 0.01). IL-8 gene expression was significantly increased in vitiligo compared with control skin (< 0.05). IL-8 may be involved in vitiligo inflammation. Inhibition by luteolin of IL-8 release could be useful for vitiligo therapy.

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