Monoclonal antibodies in treatment of multiple sclerosis

Authors

  • P. S. Rommer,

    Corresponding author
    1. Clinic and Policlinic of Neurology, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany
    2. Department of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
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  • A. Dudesek,

    1. Clinic and Policlinic of Neurology, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany
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  • O. Stüve,

    1. Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany
    2. Department of Neurology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA
    3. Neurology Section, VA North Texas Health Care System, Dallas VA Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA
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  • U.K. Zettl

    1. Clinic and Policlinic of Neurology, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany
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Summary

Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are used as therapeutics in a number of disciplines in medicine, such as oncology, rheumatology, gastroenterology, dermatology and transplant rejection prevention. Since the introduction and reintroduction of the anti-alpha4-integrin mAb natalizumab in 2004 and 2006, mAbs have gained relevance in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). At present, numerous mAbs have been tested in clinical trials in relapsing–remitting MS, and in progressive forms of MS. One of the agents that might soon be approved for very active forms of relapsing–remitting MS is alemtuzumab, a humanized mAb against CD52. This review provides insights into clinical studies with the mAbs natalizumab, alemtuzumab, daclizumab, rituximab, ocrelizumab and ofatumumab.

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