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Figure S1. Example of the influence of normal discontinuities at the silhouette in our method.

Figure S2. Left image: Objects used as light probes by our method to generate the results in Table 1.

Figure S3. Measured error (in degrees) for the experiment of one directional light, comparing our method with the previous algorithm by Lopez-Moreno et al. [LMHRG10].

Figure S4. Measured error (in degrees) for the experiment of two directional lights, comparing our method with the previous algorithm by Lopez-Moreno et al. [LMHRG10].

Figure S5. Measured error (in degrees) for the experiment of three directional lights, comparing our method with the previous algorithm by Lopez-Moreno et al. [LMHRG10].

Figure S6. Input images for the error analysis of Table 7.

Figure S7. We have tested our algorithm with a set of images and light probes used by Lopez-Moreno et al. [LMHRG10] captured under controlled (known) light configurations.

Figure S8. Top row: Large area light. Bottom row: small area light.

Figure S9. A result of compositing images through relighting by using the information from our light detector.

Figure S10. The composited objects in the figure 9: the soldier and one of the elephants.

Table S1. Error measures of the same scene with shape (E1–E4) and reflectance properties (E5–E8) different from the object used as light probe, corresponding to the images depicted in Figure 2 in top and bottom rows, respectively.

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