Clinical Oral Implants Research

Osteoblastic and cytokine gene expression of implant-adherent cells in humans

Authors

  • Matthew Bryington,

    1. Department of Prosthodontics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    2. Department of Prosthodontics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
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  • Gustavo Mendonça,

    1. Department of Prosthodontics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    2. Bone Biology and Implant Therapy Laboratory, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
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  • Salvador Nares,

    1. Department of Periodontology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
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  • Lyndon F. Cooper

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Prosthodontics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    2. Bone Biology and Implant Therapy Laboratory, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    • Corresponding author:

      Lyndon F. Cooper, DDS, PhD

      Department of Prosthodontics

      University of North Carolina

      330 Brauer Hall CB #7450

      Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA

      Tel.: +919 966 2712

      Fax: +919 966 3821

      e-mail: Lyndon_Cooper@dentistry.unc.edu

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Abstract

Objectives

Implant surface topography is a key determinant affecting osteoblastic differentiation and cell–cell signaling of implant-adherent cells.

Materials and methods

To assess the early osteoinductive and cell–cell signaling events in adherent cells, commercially pure titanium implants (2.2 × 5 mm) with nanotopography (HF-treated TiO2 grit-blasted) were compared with micron-scale topography TiO2 grit-blasted (micron-scale, control) implants in vivo. Six implants (n = 3/surface) were placed in 10 systemically healthy subjects and removed by reverse threading at 1, 3, and 7 days. Gene expression profiles of adherent cells were interrogated using low-density RT-PCR arrays.

Results

Osteoinduction was not observed at day 1 on either surface. At 3 days, elevated levels of BMP6, osteopontin, and osterix (OSX) were observed in RNA of cells adherent to both micron-scale and nanotopography surfaces. Both surfaces supported osteoinductive gene expression at 7 days; however, modest elevations of most mRNAs and significantly higher OSX mRNA levels were measured for cells adhered to nanotopography implants. Further, chemokine and cytokine profiles including CXCL10, CXCL14, IL-9, IL-22, and TOLLIP were upregulated on nanotopographic surfaces as compared with microtopographic surfaces.

Conclusions

Implants with superimposed nanoscale topography generate a greater induction of genes linked to osteogenesis and cell–cell signaling during the early phases of osseointegration.

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