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Early biocompatibility of poly (ethylene glycol) hydrogel barrier materials for guided bone regeneration. An in vitro study using human gingival fibroblasts (HGF-1)

Authors

  • Christer Dahlin,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biomaterials, Institutie for Surgical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden
    2. Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, NÄL Medical Centre Hospital, Trollhättan, Sweden
    • Corresponding author:

      Dr Christer Dahlin DDS, PhD, Dr Odont

      Department of Biomaterials

      Institutie for Surgical Sciences

      Sahlgrenska Academy

      PO Box 412, University of Gothenburg, SE 405 30 Göteborg

      Sweden

      Tel.: +46 31 786 2950

      Fax: +46 31 786 2941

      e-mails: christer.dahlin@biomaterials.gu.se; dahlinchrister@hotmail.com

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  • Anna Johansson,

    1. Department of Biomaterials, Institutie for Surgical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden
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  • Maria Hoffman,

    1. Department of Biomaterials, Institutie for Surgical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden
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  • Aart Molenberg

    1. Research Department, Institut Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland
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Abstract

Objectives

To evaluate the early cellular attachment and viability to modified polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels with the influence of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) in an in vitro model system.

Material and methods

Human gingival fibroblasts (HGF-1) were cultured on 6 different modalities of PEG hydrogel in hydrophobic polystyrene wells. A total of 7500 cells/well (10000 cells/cm2) were dispersed over the PEG filled wells and incubated in triplicates for 24 h, 7 and 13 days. Cell numbers were calculated by means of a NucleoCounter. Cell viability was determined by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). For statistical analysis, nonparametric Kruska–Wallis test followed by Dunetts T3 test were used.

Results

All PEG modifications showed good biocompatibility, as demonstrated by low LDH values per cell at the earlier two time points. After 13 days, all PEG modifications showed significantly lower number of cells compared with the controls, and the MX60 configurations demonstrated significantly higher LDH/cell values compared with the other hydrogels.

Conclusions

Modifications of the physio-chemical properties of PEG hydrogels and the addition of RGD and spacers influenced the initial cellular response of cultured HGF-1 cells. With the exception of MX60 after 13 days, all PEG formulations performed similarly well. Early cellular response should be considered when developing PEG-based material for clinical purposes.

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