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Factors related to peri-implantitis – a retrospective study

Authors

  • Stefan Renvert,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Oral Sciences, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden
    2. School of Dental Sciences, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland
    3. Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden
    • Corresponding author:

      Stefan Renvert

      Department of Oral Sciences

      Kristianstad University

      SE-29188 Kristianstad, Sweden

      Tel.: +46 44 204090

      Fax: +46 44 128590

      e-mail: stefan.renvert@hkr.se

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  • Ahmad Aghazadeh,

    1. Uppsala Käkkirurgiska Centrum, Uppsala, Sweden
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  • Hadar Hallström,

    1. Department of Periodontology, Maxillofacial Unit, Hospital of Halland, Halmstad, Sweden
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  • Gösta Rutger Persson

    1. Department of Oral Sciences, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden
    2. Departments of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
    3. Department of Periodontology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
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Abstract

Objectives

Retrospectively, we assessed the likelihood that peri-implantitis was associated with a history of systemic disease, periodontitis, and smoking habits.

Methods

Data on probing pocket depth (PPD), bleeding on probing (BOP), and radiographic bone levels were obtained from individuals with dental implants. Peri-implantitis was defined as described by Sanz & Chapple 2012. Control individuals had healthy conditions or peri-implant mucositis. Information on past history of periodontitis, systemic diseases, and on smoking habits was obtained.

Results

One hundred and seventy-two individuals had peri-implantitis (mean age: 68.2 years, SD ± 8.7), and 98 individuals (mean age: 44.7 years, SD ± 15.9) had implant health/peri-implant mucositis. The mean difference in bone level at implants between groups was 3.5 mm (SE mean ± 0.4, 95% CI: 2.8, 4.3, P < 0.001). A history of cardiovascular disease was found in 27.3% of individuals with peri-implantitis and in 3.0% of individuals in the implant health/peri-implant mucositis group. When adjusting for age, smoking, and gender, odds ratio (OR) of having peri-implantitis and a history of cardiovascular disease was 8.7 (95% CI: 1.9, 40.3 P < 0.006), and odds ratio of having a history of periodontitis was 4.5 (95% CI 2.1, 9.7, P < 0.001). Smoking or gender did not significantly contribute to the outcome.

Conclusions

In relation to a diagnosis of peri-implantitis, a high likelihood of comorbidity was expressed by a history of periodontitis and a history of cardiovascular disease.

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